96.3 mph. Wow. Brody Brecht is a Potential Top 5 Round MLB Draft Pick

GarryO37

HR Heisman
Mar 31, 2013
6,496
4,401
113
Watch the documentary “Fastball”, it’s really good.

I watched this awhile ago. Agreed, it’s really good.

I’m trying to remember. I know Bob Feller was talked about. But I thought they mentioned that Bob Feller didn’t throw anywhere close to 100 mph. I could be wrong, but I thought they figured it was in the 80s somewhere; which still would have been considered amazing back then.
 

hawkifann

HR Legend
Gold Member
Oct 5, 2001
37,742
15,581
113
I watched this awhile ago. Agreed, it’s really good.

I’m trying to remember. I know Bob Feller was talked about. But I thought they mentioned that Bob Feller didn’t throw anywhere close to 100 mph. I could be wrong, but I thought they figured it was in the 80s somewhere; which still would have been considered amazing back then.
I‘d have to go back to the doc for details as it’s been a while, but I think it was actually Walter ”Big Train” Johnson that was maybe only in the 80s. Feller was well up into the 90s, IIRC, if not all the way up with the all-timers. But it was fascinating to see all the changes in how velo has been measured over the years.
 
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LaQuintaHawkeye

HR All-American
Dec 16, 2017
4,473
6,390
113
Baseball $$ > Football $$ ...at least for any non-QB position.

I hope he sticks with FB, but wouldn't begrudge him if he decides to go all-in with baseball.

Risking major injury in FB, where his pro prospects are not as bright, just wouldn't make sense.
 

Kinnick.At.Night

HR Heisman
Jun 27, 2018
9,244
18,287
113
I watched this awhile ago. Agreed, it’s really good.

I’m trying to remember. I know Bob Feller was talked about. But I thought they mentioned that Bob Feller didn’t throw anywhere close to 100 mph. I could be wrong, but I thought they figured it was in the 80s somewhere; which still would have been considered amazing back then.

Feller threw over 100 mph. So did Walter Johnson. The top arms throughout history have all hovered just over 100 mph. The difference today is that many, many more guys are reaching those peak speeds. It used to be a matter of pure talent alone. Today, with advanced training and nutrition, there are pitchers reaching velocities they never would have been able to attain in the past.
 
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Kinnick.At.Night

HR Heisman
Jun 27, 2018
9,244
18,287
113
I‘d have to go back to the doc for details as it’s been a while, but I think it was actually Walter ”Big Train” Johnson that was maybe only in the 80s. Feller was well up into the 90s, IIRC, if not all the way up with the all-timers. But it was fascinating to see all the changes in how velo has been measured over the years.

Walter Johnson's speed was the greatest that many, many people in baseball ever saw. People who were around the game for decades after he stopped pitching. A fastball in the 80s isn't fast. To anyone.
 

hawkifann

HR Legend
Gold Member
Oct 5, 2001
37,742
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Walter Johnson's speed was the greatest that many, many people in baseball ever saw. People who were around the game for decades after he stopped pitching. A fastball in the 80s isn't fast. To anyone.
Well, that was only part of the story. Walter Johnson’s fastball came out lower based on some of the measurement techniques - he was measured at the time as being 88-91 mph, which certainly is not special now, but the nature of the measurement had that speed being measured past where home plate would have been. Here’s a link and brief summary for what “Fastball” presented:

“In 1917, Johnson's fastball was tested in a Bridgeport, Conn., munitions laboratory at 122 feet per second, which converts to 83.2 mph. Feller's fastball was measured on the field in the late 1940s using Army equipment designed to measure artillery shell velocity. He clocked in at 98.6. And Ryan was clocked at 100.9 mph on Aug. 20, 1974, against the Tigers, when ABC's Monday Night Baseball first used a radar gun in a game.

But the speed of Johnson's fastball was measured after it would have crossed home plate. Feller's was measured at home plate. And Ryan's was measured approximately 10 feet in front of home plate. Today's MLB standard, the one by which Chapman was judged, is to use pitch speed measured at 50 feet from home plate.

"Johnson, Feller and Ryan were all timed in a very accurate way by reliable means, but the tests were very different from one another, based on where the ball was clocked," Hock said. "We had the opportunity to take these apples-to-oranges comparisons and make them apples-to-apples with the help of some brilliant physicists from Carnegie Mellon University."

 

Kinnick.At.Night

HR Heisman
Jun 27, 2018
9,244
18,287
113
Well, that was only part of the story. Walter Johnson’s fastball came out lower based on some of the measurement techniques - he was measured at the time as being 88-91 mph, which certainly is not special now, but the nature of the measurement had that speed being measured past where home plate would have been. Here’s a link and brief summary for what “Fastball” presented:

“In 1917, Johnson's fastball was tested in a Bridgeport, Conn., munitions laboratory at 122 feet per second, which converts to 83.2 mph. Feller's fastball was measured on the field in the late 1940s using Army equipment designed to measure artillery shell velocity. He clocked in at 98.6. And Ryan was clocked at 100.9 mph on Aug. 20, 1974, against the Tigers, when ABC's Monday Night Baseball first used a radar gun in a game.

But the speed of Johnson's fastball was measured after it would have crossed home plate. Feller's was measured at home plate. And Ryan's was measured approximately 10 feet in front of home plate. Today's MLB standard, the one by which Chapman was judged, is to use pitch speed measured at 50 feet from home plate.

"Johnson, Feller and Ryan were all timed in a very accurate way by reliable means, but the tests were very different from one another, based on where the ball was clocked," Hock said. "We had the opportunity to take these apples-to-oranges comparisons and make them apples-to-apples with the help of some brilliant physicists from Carnegie Mellon University."

I’m aware of all of this. Walter Johnson threw significantly harder than 88-91 mph. That’s not impressive to anyone. At any time. Almost to a man, everyone who saw Johnson throw said he was the fastest ever.
 

LaQuintaHawkeye

HR All-American
Dec 16, 2017
4,473
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Walter Johnson threw significantly harder than 88-91 mph. That’s not impressive to anyone. At any time.
Yep, i’m sure he was more in the mid 90s at least. However, that was very fast back in those days. Especially considering the science of mechanics hadn’t really been developed yet. Not many, if any, could reach 100+ if not for the modern science of mechanics, along with conditioning and nutrition. At least not on a consistent basis.


*Nolan Ryan being the exception and one of the founders in the art of modern throwing mechanics
 

hawkifann

HR Legend
Gold Member
Oct 5, 2001
37,742
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I’m aware of all of this. Walter Johnson threw significantly harder than 88-91 mph. That’s not impressive to anyone. At any time. Almost to a man, everyone who saw Johnson throw said he was the fastest ever.
Well of course he did. My post #323 was faulty from memory. I was remembering the *measurement* of Walter Johnson, not what he actually threw. Nobody really knows for sure where he topped out, but the high 80s measurement came at a distance point farther than 60 feet from the release point, so it’s not apples to apples with how we measure today. The ball was obviously traveling much faster at the point where we measure velo today.

Personally, I think the hardest throwers from every era were fairly comparable. There can be some variance given the composition of the baseball and how that’s changed over time, but I think there are limits to what the human arm is capable of and elite arm talent seems to top out around 100-105 and probably always has. I think we’re inching that number up a very small amount with modern training programs, but the biggest impact today’s training methods have had is to increase the number of guys hitting up against those maximums.
 

hawkifann

HR Legend
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Oct 5, 2001
37,742
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Will warm weather and a big wind make much difference in his speed?
In terms of velo? Probably not. I suppose nasty winds can mess with everything, but a guy who can throw 100 will throw hard regardless of conditions. Things like wind, humidity, temperature, elevation, etc., can impact spin rates and impact overall movement on pitches and overall command but they don’t typically play a big role in impacting velo.
 

Arbor1

All-Conference
Dec 16, 2014
414
828
93
Time to face reality on the BB football scholarship. Everyone has patiently waited to see how this plays out but the experiment is nearing an end. Every scholarship matters.
 
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Frosty7130

HR All-American
Oct 11, 2012
3,721
7,735
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South Dakota
Time to face reality on the BB football scholarship. Everyone has patiently waited to see how this plays out but the experiment is nearing an end. Every scholarship matters.
How many times does it need to be said that

A) Brody himself stated multiple times he wants to play football

B) Since he enrolled in school, he is not draft eligible until 2024.
 
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just_somebody

HR All-American
Gold Member
Mar 1, 2006
4,120
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Time to face reality on the BB football scholarship. Everyone has patiently waited to see how this plays out but the experiment is nearing an end. Every scholarship matters.
britney-britney-spears.gif
 

hawkifann

HR Legend
Gold Member
Oct 5, 2001
37,742
15,581
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Time to face reality on the BB football scholarship. Everyone has patiently waited to see how this plays out but the experiment is nearing an end. Every scholarship matters.
Soooo….cut him in football because he might get drafted after the 2024 baseball season? Seems prudent.
 

Arbor1

All-Conference
Dec 16, 2014
414
828
93
Soooo….cut him in football because he might get drafted after the 2024 baseball season? Seems prudent.
Nearing an end as I said. If he wants to play fb he needs to play fb. The grace period of partial involvement only lasts so long for many reasons. The magical world of dabbling in both does not work at this level as you will see.
 
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AuroraHawk

HR Heisman
Dec 18, 2004
6,173
7,957
113
Nearing an end as I said. If he wants to play fb he needs to play fb. The grace period of partial involvement only lasts so long for many reasons. The magical world of dabbling in both does not work at this level as you will see.

His performance trainer is Jeff Szmardjia’s brother. I don’t envision that Brecht is about to give up dabbling in both football and baseball.

Moreover, if he abandons football, there may be incentives for him to look at other baseball programs.
 

ISUBryceC

Scout Team
Apr 4, 2022
148
100
43
Nearing an end as I said. If he wants to play fb he needs to play fb. The grace period of partial involvement only lasts so long for many reasons. The magical world of dabbling in both does not work at this level as you will see.

I agree, nearing the end. Just 2 more years minimum.

This is just weird anyway. Charlie transferred late giving the staff no time to really go after another WR. This isn't the year at the very least to start thinking about him off the team.

He can be valuable to both programs. He's finally healthy. Great work by him.
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,347
6,122
113
Nearing an end as I said. If he wants to play fb he needs to play fb. The grace period of partial involvement only lasts so long for many reasons. The magical world of dabbling in both does not work at this level as you will see.
Kf wouldn't have given him a scholly if he cared
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,347
6,122
113
I agree, nearing the end. Just 2 more years minimum.

This is just weird anyway. Charlie transferred late giving the staff no time to really go after another WR. This isn't the year at the very least to start thinking about him off the team.

He can be valuable to both programs. He's finally healthy. Great work by him.
Why is it weird?