BF on Purdue game

cidhawkeye

HR Legend
Jun 21, 2009
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Oh yeah. I witnessed said language on a number of occasions myself. If they gave up a score he would meet them right when coming off the field and it tended to be an ass chewing all the way back to the bench.
And rarely anything constructive, just profanity. When Bert was there he had the profanity as well but would coach them up while using it…. Kaz rarely
 

pistachio1999

HR MVP
Nov 29, 2021
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And rarely anything constructive, just profanity. When Bert was there he had the profanity as well but would coach them up while using it…. Kaz rarely
Yeah it was just to tear 'em down. They just took it of course. Klug, Clayborn, Ballard, and I think Bins. Back in the time when they rarely rotated DL out like they do now. So they were tired.
 

Titanhawk2

HR Legend
Jul 14, 2011
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Link???
Sounds like he is blaming the players in total frosty fashion!

Maybe neb will hire him next year.

Sounds quite douchey
What are you supposed to say when it is not executed properly? Should have called something that was easier to do?
 
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DodgerHawki

HR Heisman
Nov 19, 2002
9,696
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What are you supposed to say when it is not executed properly? Should have called something that was easier to do?
Yeah, people get all sensitive and overwrought about these things.

Of course there are plays all the time when a good call is made and a player or players just make mistakes. There are obvious ones, like the QB overthrows a wide open receiver. Or a receiver drops a pass. Or a lineman forgets the snap count and doesn't come off the ball and gets beat. Very rarely, if ever, does KF or staff call out an individual player after the game even if everyone who watched the game know what happened. It is literally a nothing-burger if BF in one of these lengthy interviews (when reviewing film) says that play was a case of poor execution. The failed halfback pass in the Big 10 title game is an example. Formation, area on field, situation all fooled Michigan. Pottebaum is wide open but he falls down going after the pass from Williams. It happens.

I listened to the lengthy podcast with Leistikow and my reaction is meh. Yes, the job of an OC is way more complicated than the fan in the stands or watching at home realizes. But okay, that's the job. His entire tenure as OC, Iowa hasn't been efficient throwing the ball, outside of one year with Hockenson and Fant where Iowa was very efficient in the red zone. Either the concepts being taught are too complicated and/or not effective in today's football, or they aren't being taught very well to the players. But in 5 years it by and large has been the same thing throwing the football. Either get it figured out or get someone in here who can.
 

cidhawkeye

HR Legend
Jun 21, 2009
13,112
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Yeah, people get all sensitive and overwrought about these things.

Of course there are plays all the time when a good call is made and a player or players just make mistakes. There are obvious ones, like the QB overthrows a wide open receiver. Or a receiver drops a pass. Or a lineman forgets the snap count and doesn't come off the ball and gets beat. Very rarely, if ever, does KF or staff call out an individual player after the game even if everyone who watched the game know what happened. It is literally a nothing-burger if BF in one of these lengthy interviews (when reviewing film) says that play was a case of poor execution. The failed halfback pass in the Big 10 title game is an example. Formation, area on field, situation all fooled Michigan. Pottebaum is wide open but he falls down going after the pass from Williams. It happens.

I listened to the lengthy podcast with Leistikow and my reaction is meh. Yes, the job of an OC is way more complicated than the fan in the stands or watching at home realizes. But okay, that's the job. His entire tenure as OC, Iowa hasn't been efficient throwing the ball, outside of one year with Hockenson and Fant where Iowa was very efficient in the red zone. Either the concepts being taught are too complicated and/or not effective in today's football, or they aren't being taught very well to the players. But in 5 years it by and large has been the same thing throwing the football. Either get it figured out or get someone in here who can.
When a coach is 'on' they can teach complicated processes and boil it down to a pretty understandable concept. The fact that the Iowa offense is supposedly very difficult to grasp is a head scratcher. I have dealt with enough coaches/leaders/managers/etc. that felt the need to be the smartest person in the room. It is very annoying to those of us who are. Hopefully they are working on making the concepts easier to grasp so talented players can see the field sooner and be able to react and make plays rather than thinking so much.
 

walleye hunter16

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Sep 25, 2016
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I'll never understand how you or anyone else could have been all in on that hire. Hiring any novice, much less your son, to solve the severe and long standing problem with the Iowa offense was really as stupid or self-serving as it gets. KF even suggesting it should have sent up red flags.
How hard is that really to understand?
The vast majority of people on the planet are going to hire/promote someone who sees things they way they do or will do what they think is the right thing hing to do.
Isn't your son one of the more obvious choices?
 
Feb 13, 2005
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Yeah, people get all sensitive and overwrought about these things.

Of course there are plays all the time when a good call is made and a player or players just make mistakes. There are obvious ones, like the QB overthrows a wide open receiver. Or a receiver drops a pass. Or a lineman forgets the snap count and doesn't come off the ball and gets beat. Very rarely, if ever, does KF or staff call out an individual player after the game even if everyone who watched the game know what happened. It is literally a nothing-burger if BF in one of these lengthy interviews (when reviewing film) says that play was a case of poor execution. The failed halfback pass in the Big 10 title game is an example. Formation, area on field, situation all fooled Michigan. Pottebaum is wide open but he falls down going after the pass from Williams. It happens.

I listened to the lengthy podcast with Leistikow and my reaction is meh. Yes, the job of an OC is way more complicated than the fan in the stands or watching at home realizes. But okay, that's the job. His entire tenure as OC, Iowa hasn't been efficient throwing the ball, outside of one year with Hockenson and Fant where Iowa was very efficient in the red zone. Either the concepts being taught are too complicated and/or not effective in today's football, or they aren't being taught very well to the players. But in 5 years it by and large has been the same thing throwing the football. Either get it figured out or get someone in here who can.

Very well said. Play calling is just one aspect of a coordinator's job. The coordinator also needs to be able to teach proper execution of plays. Blaming execution is not an excuse for an OC, it's an indictment.

I've listened to several of Brian's interviews and coaching clinic speeches, and he is clearly a smart guy that's obsessed with football. The lack of success offensively is not due to Brian not knowing enough about offense. So what is the issue? Not everyone with extensive knowledge is a good teacher. My guess is that Brian tries to over-teach and that many guys on the team feel like they're drinking from a fire hose with the amount of information being thrown at them, and that Brian needs to adapt to find a way to make it simpler so that the players can play more freely. If you're thinking rather than relying on instincts in any sport, you're not going to perform at your best. In Iowa's offense, especially in the passing game, it has seemed like there's a ton of "thinking" going on and a lack of players trusting their instincts/playing free.
 
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DodgerHawki

HR Heisman
Nov 19, 2002
9,696
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Very well said. Play calling is just one aspect of a coordinator's job. The coordinator also needs to be able to teach proper execution of plays. Blaming execution is not an excuse for an OC, it's an indictment.

I've listened several of Brian's interviews and coaching clinic speeches, and he is clearly a smart guy that's obsessed with football. The lack of success offensively is not due to Brian not knowing enough about offense. So what is the issue? Not everyone with extensive knowledge is a good teacher. My guess is that Brian tries to over-teach and that many guys on the team feel like they're drinking from a fire hose with the amount of information being thrown at them, and that Brian needs to adapt to find a way to make it simpler so that the players can play more freely. If you're thinking rather than relying on instincts in any sport, you're not going to perform at your best. In Iowa's offense, especially in the passing game, it has seemed like there's a ton of "thinking" going on and a lack of players trusting their instincts/playing free.
Yeah it's an interesting discussion. I don't know what the answer is, and it's likely that none of us can know 100% as we don't see practice, only games. But other teams with similar talent don't make throwing the football that difficult, so it can be done.

I get that Iowa likes to huddle, and not have the QB looking to the sideline for a check or call once they are at the LOS. They like to huddle as it establishes a rhythm and cadence to the game that Iowa prefers. Cool. And going no huddle and looking to the sideline for the play call doesn't guarantee success. Iowa's defense was very effective against numerous teams that operate this way last year. But figure out a way to be efficient on offense. As you said, it's an indictment on the program if a QB coming in needs 2-3 years in the system before they can be successful. You are not helping your program by doing that. At all.
 

obfuscating

HR Heisman
Jan 8, 2016
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For yelling profanity at the replay ref in the booth. Pretty well known. And if you don't think the coaches on the sidelines don't yell profanity and sometimes at the refs on the field I have some news for you. Does that make them bad people too?
It was a rhetorical question. I have heard BF tirade on the sidelines a few times with daddy following behind playing the good cop.

Those on the sideline werent around donors, etc yelling profanities. Big difference.
 

grayhair81

HR Legend
Sep 3, 2006
10,850
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For yelling profanity at the replay ref in the booth. Pretty well known. And if you don't think the coaches on the sidelines don't yell profanity and sometimes at the refs on the field I have some news for you. Does that make them bad people too?

Big difference between what refs will tolerate from a HC vs an assistant. Also big difference in behavioral expectation between the sideline and the pressbox.
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

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May 9, 2018
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I'm shocked. Profanity at a college football game? Shocking. BF's language wouldn't be a problem if he was putting up 40 a game.

Please don't reply about "the children there". You choose to take your children into a place where thousands of drunks are working themselves into a frenzy you pretty much demonstrated your willingness to expose them to profanity of the most obscene nature.
 

HawkOn15

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Oct 19, 2015
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For yelling profanity at the replay ref in the booth. Pretty well known. And if you don't think the coaches on the sidelines don't yell profanity and sometimes at the refs on the field I have some news for you. Does that make them bad people too?
Not that reason at all.
 

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