Do we credit Biden for the strong dollar?

torbee

HR King
Gold Member
I think it's dumb to blame a president for gas prices (and frankly the vast majority of macroeconomic measures), but apparently we have to.

So is the corollary true? Do we have to credit/thank the president for this positive economic trend?

Undergirding the dollar’s strength is a Federal Reserve that is seen by markets as more determined than other central banks to raise interest rates to snuff out inflation. Economists also point to the U.S. economy, which has better long-term growth prospects than most other nations and has more cushion in the form of strong employment and high savings to withstand a global downturn.

 

torbee

HR King
Gold Member
By all means. This was the plan all along. Sheesh...
I think you missed my point.

Neither gas prices nor currency strength are part of anyone's "plan." And their strength or lack thereof is not dictated by the President of the United States, but rather by myriad global factors that cannot be controlled by POTUS.
 

Bank of Hawk

HR Heisman
Gold Member
Feb 24, 2007
9,650
11,209
113
Well a strong dollar has pros and cons of course. It shows me that the world still runs to the dollar as a reserve currency.

While nothing is perfect, America still has the strongest economy, partly due to smart government policies and regulations.
 
  • Like
Reactions: torbee

Hoosierhawkeye

HR Legend
Sep 16, 2008
46,773
38,704
113
40
Doesn't this also indicate that we are doing better on inflation than other nations since the value of the dollar is increasing relative to theirs?
 
  • Like
Reactions: torbee

hawkland14

HR Heisman
Gold Member
Feb 26, 2013
7,416
7,372
113
Why do people like torbee believe that Biden is the first president to be blamed for high gas prices? His team has been pretty good at blaming in the past. This is party politics at its best.

It is fun watching Team Blue protect Biden like he is an 80 year old dementia patient. Wait...

 
  • Like
Reactions: 23 so far

NoleATL

HR Legend
Gold Member
Jul 11, 2007
29,793
27,742
113
I think it's dumb to blame a president for gas prices (and frankly the vast majority of macroeconomic measures), but apparently we have to.

So is the corollary true? Do we have to credit/thank the president for this positive economic trend?

Undergirding the dollar’s strength is a Federal Reserve that is seen by markets as more determined than other central banks to raise interest rates to snuff out inflation. Economists also point to the U.S. economy, which has better long-term growth prospects than most other nations and has more cushion in the form of strong employment and high savings to withstand a global downturn.

Just in time for our trip to Spain in less than 3 weeks!
 
  • Like
Reactions: torbee

Jan Itor

HR Legend
Jan 31, 2009
28,257
12,231
113
I think it's dumb to blame a president for gas prices (and frankly the vast majority of macroeconomic measures), but apparently we have to.

So is the corollary true? Do we have to credit/thank the president for this positive economic trend?

Undergirding the dollar’s strength is a Federal Reserve that is seen by markets as more determined than other central banks to raise interest rates to snuff out inflation. Economists also point to the U.S. economy, which has better long-term growth prospects than most other nations and has more cushion in the form of strong employment and high savings to withstand a global downturn.

Sure, as long as you blame him for inflation and everything else gone wrong.

Personally, I don't think POTUS should get the blame for inflation, gas prices, recessions, etc.... And they don't get the credit for the strong dollar and jobs numbers.
 

Latest posts