FBI Director On 60 Minutes Says China is Biggest Threat to US

West Dundee Hawkeye

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China Threat

60 Minutes segment from last Sunday, FBI Director Wray says:
1. China is biggest threat to the US
2. China targeting innovation, trade secrets and intellectual property
3. China has stole more personal and corporate data from US than every other nation combined
4. FBI starts a new China investigation every 12 hours
 

noleclone2

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Yep. Especially after Russia just showed the World they are a complete paper tiger, on the brink of losing a war with Ukraine they where they have now committed 1/2 military to win (and lost 25% of fighting capacity).

China needs to be figured out soon. We have given over too much of our supply chain to them, as we are again going to find out soon with them closing factories once again for Covid.
 

hawkiniowacity

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lets start holding the feet of corporations that prop up china’s economy and sell out our supply chain to them for profit to the fire.

American consumers….are you willing to make the personal sacrifice of not purchasing chinese made goods?
You know the answer. Thatd cause paychecks to not go as far, and your average American is going to choose new toys over the greater good 99% of the time.
 

joelbc1

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you can’t always get what you want!
China has the US by its ( corporate/financial) balls! When you control the balls, the mind will follow! This has always been the #1 danger the US exposed itself to, ever since Nixon and Mao sat down to cocktails all those years ago. US corporations long term strategies consist of the bottom line of the next quarter....China’s long term views are what’s going to happen in 10-20 years from now.
 

binsfeldcyhawk2

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Need to learn from Ukraine and arm Taiwan to the teeth....

Basically following our Ukraine policy pre-war and limiting what we give Taiwan so as not to piss off the Chinese....doesn't work
 
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goldmom

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China has the US by its ( corporate/financial) balls! When you control the balls, the mind will follow! This has always been the #1 danger the US exposed itself to, ever since Nixon and Mao sat down to cocktails all those years ago. US corporations long term strategies consist of the bottom line of the next quarter....China’s long term views are what’s going to happen in 10-20 years from now.

China didn’t have to pull down anyone’s pants. US Corporations were offered $$$ opportunities to make billions in profits and took it. Pulled down their own pants and offered up their (balls) for money. The Chinese set up a 20th Century opium den. Draw in the arrogant Americans who thought they had found the perfect way to create success.
China has always had a long game. I had a Government Professor way back in the day during the height of Mao’s reign. He had been In British intelligence. When asked if China was a bigger “threat” than Russia he said not for at least thirty years, and that certain things would have to change around the world in addition to inside that country that were beneficial to them to make it happen.
Lo and behold it has largely trended in their favor. We have become addicted to their inexpensive (and consistently inferior) products.
So much consumerism in America and we’re all participants.
 

Barnstormers Hoops

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I’ve said for years that to help reduce the flow of illegal immigrants and lessen our dependence on China we should be putting money into Mexico and Central America. I know some factories have opened there which is a nice start but more of that needs to happen. We’d still get inexpensive goods, but they wouldn’t have to be shipped on freighters across the ocean so it would have to save time and money too. Plus these jobs would improve things so not as many would be at the border.
 

seminole97

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I’ve said for years that to help reduce the flow of illegal immigrants and lessen our dependence on China we should be putting money into Mexico and Central America. I know some factories have opened there which is a nice start but more of that needs to happen. We’d still get inexpensive goods, but they wouldn’t have to be shipped on freighters across the ocean so it would have to save time and money too. Plus these jobs would improve things so not as many would be at the border.

This canard about China being a low cost, low skilled producer keeps coming up. As if we could throw money at Central America and create the very labor force we’re lacking.
So I’ll keep posting this comment from Tim Cook (Apple):

“The number one reason why we like to be in China is the people. China has extraordinary skills. And the part that's the most unknown is there's almost two million application developers in China that write apps for the iOS App Store. These are some of the most innovative mobile apps in the world, and the entrepreneurs that run them are some of the most inspiring and entrepreneurial in the world. Those are sold not only here but exported around the world.

China has moved into very advanced manufacturing, so you find in China the intersection of craftsman kind of skill, and sophisticated robotics and the computer science world. That intersection, which is very rare to find anywhere, that kind of skill, is very important to our business because of the precision and quality level that we like. The thing that most people focus on if they're a foreigner coming to China is the size of the market, and obviously it's the biggest market in the world in so many areas. But for us, the number one attraction is the quality of the people.

I visited ICT--they manufacture, among other things, the AirPods for us. When you think about AirPods as a user, you might think it couldn't be that hard because it's really small. The AirPods have several hundred components in them, and the level of precision embedded into the audio quality--without getting into really nerdy engineering--it's really hard. And it requires a level of skill that's extremely high.

It's not designed and sent over--that sounds like there's no interaction. The truth is, the process engineering and process development associated with our products require innovation in and of itself. Not only the product but the way that it's made, because we want to make things in the scale of hundreds of millions, and we want the quality level of zero defects. That's always what we strive for, and the way that you get there, particularly when you're pushing the envelope in the type of materials that you have, and the precision that your specifications are forcing, requires a kind of hand-in-glove partnership. You don't do it by throwing it over the chasm. It would never work. I can't imagine how that would be.

There's a confusion about China. The popular conception is that companies come to China because of low labor cost. I'm not sure what part of China they go to, but the truth is China stopped being the low-labor-cost country many years ago. And that is not the reason to come to China from a supply point of view. The reason is because of the skill, and the quantity of skill in one location and the type of skill it is.

The products we do require really advanced tooling, and the precision that you have to have, the tooling and working with the materials that we do are state of the art. And the tooling skill is very deep here. In the U.S., you could have a meeting of tooling engineers and I'm not sure we could fill the room. In China, you could fill multiple football fields.

The vocational expertise is very very deep here, and I give the education system a lot of credit for continuing to push on that even when others were de-emphasizing vocational.
Now I think many countries in the world have woke up and said this is a key thing and we've got to correct that. China called that right from the beginning.”
 

joelbc1

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you can’t always get what you want!
China didn’t have to pull down anyone’s pants. US Corporations were offered $$$ opportunities to make billions in profits and took it. Pulled down their own pants and offered up their (balls) for money. The Chinese set up a 20th Century opium den. Draw in the arrogant Americans who thought they had found the perfect way to create success.
China has always had a long game. I had a Government Professor way back in the day during the height of Mao’s reign. He had been In British intelligence. When asked if China was a bigger “threat” than Russia he said not for at least thirty years, and that certain things would have to change around the world in addition to inside that country that were beneficial to them to make it happen.
Lo and behold it has largely trended in their favor. We have become addicted to their inexpensive (and consistently inferior) products.
So much consumerism in America and we’re all participants.
The “ consumerism” of the US has been used against us effectively. The America’s trait of “saving a buck” has led to our demise economically. WalMart buys their stuff from Red China and profits by taking US dollars and shipping them to Peking/Shanghai. Meanwhile, this “saving a buck” has put fellow citizens out of jobs, resulted in lower of flatter wages for middle America and has finally erupted into all aspećts of American life. China knows retry much what they are doing every step of the way. They will “out wait” America...that is why they are so diabolical.
 

Barnstormers Hoops

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This canard about China being a low cost, low skilled producer keeps coming up. As if we could throw money at Central America and create the very labor force we’re lacking.
So I’ll keep posting this comment from Tim Cook (Apple):

“The number one reason why we like to be in China is the people. China has extraordinary skills. And the part that's the most unknown is there's almost two million application developers in China that write apps for the iOS App Store. These are some of the most innovative mobile apps in the world, and the entrepreneurs that run them are some of the most inspiring and entrepreneurial in the world. Those are sold not only here but exported around the world.

China has moved into very advanced manufacturing, so you find in China the intersection of craftsman kind of skill, and sophisticated robotics and the computer science world. That intersection, which is very rare to find anywhere, that kind of skill, is very important to our business because of the precision and quality level that we like. The thing that most people focus on if they're a foreigner coming to China is the size of the market, and obviously it's the biggest market in the world in so many areas. But for us, the number one attraction is the quality of the people.

I visited ICT--they manufacture, among other things, the AirPods for us. When you think about AirPods as a user, you might think it couldn't be that hard because it's really small. The AirPods have several hundred components in them, and the level of precision embedded into the audio quality--without getting into really nerdy engineering--it's really hard. And it requires a level of skill that's extremely high.

It's not designed and sent over--that sounds like there's no interaction. The truth is, the process engineering and process development associated with our products require innovation in and of itself. Not only the product but the way that it's made, because we want to make things in the scale of hundreds of millions, and we want the quality level of zero defects. That's always what we strive for, and the way that you get there, particularly when you're pushing the envelope in the type of materials that you have, and the precision that your specifications are forcing, requires a kind of hand-in-glove partnership. You don't do it by throwing it over the chasm. It would never work. I can't imagine how that would be.

There's a confusion about China. The popular conception is that companies come to China because of low labor cost. I'm not sure what part of China they go to, but the truth is China stopped being the low-labor-cost country many years ago. And that is not the reason to come to China from a supply point of view. The reason is because of the skill, and the quantity of skill in one location and the type of skill it is.

The products we do require really advanced tooling, and the precision that you have to have, the tooling and working with the materials that we do are state of the art. And the tooling skill is very deep here. In the U.S., you could have a meeting of tooling engineers and I'm not sure we could fill the room. In China, you could fill multiple football fields.

The vocational expertise is very very deep here, and I give the education system a lot of credit for continuing to push on that even when others were de-emphasizing vocational.
Now I think many countries in the world have woke up and said this is a key thing and we've got to correct that. China called that right from the beginning.”
There is skill and that is beneficial in the tech field, but the toys and other cheap items it’s not a world of difference. China developed that skill over time. So would other locations. Just look at Vietnam. They have quickly demonstrated they are a viable alternative, but they border China and you have to ship through areas China is beefing up with man made islands. Bring these factories to Central America and I bet in a decade they catch up or get real close to it. Maybe leave some stuff in China, but spread things out some so there’s not that dependence on them for all things.
 
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Titanhawk2

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China Threat

60 Minutes segment from last Sunday, FBI Director Wray says:
1. China is biggest threat to the US
2. China targeting innovation, trade secrets and intellectual property
3. China has stole more personal and corporate data from US than every other nation combined
4. FBI starts a new China investigation every 12 hours
Good thing our POTUS is in good with them
 
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seminole97

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Bring these factories to Central America and I bet in a decade they catch up or get real close to it. Maybe leave some stuff in China, but spread things out some so there’s not that dependence on them for all things.
Why do you think they haven’t done so?
Just didn’t occur to them?
 

BioHawk

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Sep 21, 2005
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There is skill and that is beneficial in the tech field, but the toys and other cheap items it’s not a world of difference. China developed that skill over time. So would other locations. Just look at Vietnam. They have quickly demonstrated they are a viable alternative, but they border China and you have to ship through areas China is beefing up with man made islands. Bring these factories to Central America and I bet in a decade they catch up or get real close to it. Maybe leave some stuff in China, but spread things out some so there’s not that dependence on them for all things.
The problem with Central America is many of the countries don't have the stability in their government to support these things. And one thing we have proven we can't do very well is provide stability for governments, at least without putting troops on the ground in that country to provide security.

I agree though, beefing up that area would help a number of issues, including illegal immigration as fewer people would be leaving. But they have things that need to be worked out first. Honestly, we just need to bring this manufacturing home. Of course that has been the solution for decades, but businesses and therefore congresspeople don't want it.
 

luvmyhawks

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Mar 22, 2005
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This canard about China being a low cost, low skilled producer keeps coming up. As if we could throw money at Central America and create the very labor force we’re lacking.
So I’ll keep posting this comment from Tim Cook (Apple):

“The number one reason why we like to be in China is the people. China has extraordinary skills. And the part that's the most unknown is there's almost two million application developers in China that write apps for the iOS App Store. These are some of the most innovative mobile apps in the world, and the entrepreneurs that run them are some of the most inspiring and entrepreneurial in the world. Those are sold not only here but exported around the world.

China has moved into very advanced manufacturing, so you find in China the intersection of craftsman kind of skill, and sophisticated robotics and the computer science world. That intersection, which is very rare to find anywhere, that kind of skill, is very important to our business because of the precision and quality level that we like. The thing that most people focus on if they're a foreigner coming to China is the size of the market, and obviously it's the biggest market in the world in so many areas. But for us, the number one attraction is the quality of the people.

I visited ICT--they manufacture, among other things, the AirPods for us. When you think about AirPods as a user, you might think it couldn't be that hard because it's really small. The AirPods have several hundred components in them, and the level of precision embedded into the audio quality--without getting into really nerdy engineering--it's really hard. And it requires a level of skill that's extremely high.

It's not designed and sent over--that sounds like there's no interaction. The truth is, the process engineering and process development associated with our products require innovation in and of itself. Not only the product but the way that it's made, because we want to make things in the scale of hundreds of millions, and we want the quality level of zero defects. That's always what we strive for, and the way that you get there, particularly when you're pushing the envelope in the type of materials that you have, and the precision that your specifications are forcing, requires a kind of hand-in-glove partnership. You don't do it by throwing it over the chasm. It would never work. I can't imagine how that would be.

There's a confusion about China. The popular conception is that companies come to China because of low labor cost. I'm not sure what part of China they go to, but the truth is China stopped being the low-labor-cost country many years ago. And that is not the reason to come to China from a supply point of view. The reason is because of the skill, and the quantity of skill in one location and the type of skill it is.

The products we do require really advanced tooling, and the precision that you have to have, the tooling and working with the materials that we do are state of the art. And the tooling skill is very deep here. In the U.S., you could have a meeting of tooling engineers and I'm not sure we could fill the room. In China, you could fill multiple football fields.

The vocational expertise is very very deep here, and I give the education system a lot of credit for continuing to push on that even when others were de-emphasizing vocational.
Now I think many countries in the world have woke up and said this is a key thing and we've got to correct that. China called that right from the beginning.”

And I’ll post the same thing I have in response to your post before. They are stealing this knowledge from us. Also, Tim Cook sounds like someone that has a vested interest in China. I wonder why. Oh, no I don’t.
 

seminole97

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And I’ll post the same thing I have in response to your post before. They are stealing this knowledge from us. Also, Tim Cook sounds like someone that has a vested interest in China. I wonder why. Oh, no I don’t.
They’re stealing vocational expertise from us?

They’re turning out football stadiums full of tooling engineers and we’re arguing how much racial angst to include in our math lessons.

I don’t think they’re ‘stealing this knowledge from us’, we’ve forsaken it in favor of de-emphasizing white supremacy measures like trying to find the ‘right answer’ in math.
 

luvmyhawks

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Mar 22, 2005
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They’re stealing vocational expertise from us?

They’re turning out football stadiums full of tooling engineers and we’re arguing how much racial angst to include in our math lessons.

I don’t think they’re ‘stealing this knowledge from us’, we’ve forsaken it in favor of de-emphasizing white supremacy measures like trying to find the ‘right answer’ in math.

We have been training and providing them with the resources for decades with apple being one of the biggest culprits. You know, the company Tim Cook is the ceo of. That’s not to take away from chinas priority to education. I agree americas priority in the department is absurd.
 

goldmom

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If you’ve even recently shopped for anything - like an Easter basket or the fake “grass” to put in them or any holiday related theme decor EVERY ONE is made in China.
It just slays me to walk into a WalMart or Big Lots or Target or Five Below to get the little US flags so many of us put out by our mailboxes or flowerbeds for Memorial Day or the Fourth of July and every single dang one is made in a country who wants to take us and the world over.
 
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HR Heisman
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We have been training and providing them with the resources for decades with apple being one of the biggest culprits. You know, the company Tim Cook is the ceo of. That’s not to take away from chinas priority to education. I agree americas priority in the department is absurd.
This is absolutely true. I worked for a fairly large American based corporation that I left about 25 years ago (about 80k employees worldwide) . At the time my boss (primarily a Quality Engineer) and I were making plans to go to China where they were moving a product line. I left the company and never went, but my former boss and a good friend of mine eventually did go to China to train and observe. Then you collaborate from afar, and others eventually go to train and observe as well.

The same thing happened in Mexico with this company at the very same location. They moved a plant right across the border from McCallen TX I believe, brought down experienced Mechanical Engineers to live in McCallen and work down there, brought up Mexicans to train in Iowa as Machinist's, and had some brilliant retired Engineers as consultants to this Mexico location. All people I know personally.

The end result? That manufacturer that employed 700 workers at one time in a town of 11,000 people for 50 years is now gone. It was a good place to work, good pay for the locals and always bringing in young Engineer's and their eventual families. The large majority of those young Engineer's never left once they arrived.

That's a big time hit to one community, and that's just one of many corporations who have done this very same thing.
 
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HawkRCID

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Yep I firmly believe the next century is us vs China. Ironically enough Russia actually elevated China completely by showing what a complete joke they are.

It’s fascinating that in the last six months both Romney and Obama appeared to be correct in their assessment of Russia in 2012. First for Romney saying they are the top foe, when it became apparent they would invade Ukraine….then when Obama sort of said it’s not the 80’s anymore when we all realized what a paper tiger russia has become.
 

jasonrann

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China has the US by its ( corporate/financial) balls! When you control the balls, the mind will follow! This has always been the #1 danger the US exposed itself to, ever since Nixon and Mao sat down to cocktails all those years ago. US corporations long term strategies consist of the bottom line of the next quarter....China’s long term views are what’s going to happen in 10-20 years from now.
The last time I was in China for work was 2012. I was there from 2001 to 2012 around 10-12 times. All they did was build build build factories, hotels and commercial buildings. Even if they had a building/factory they knew would be empty for years, they built anyway because labor was cheap and they knew sheep were coming. Even as labor costs have risen, they still have us firmly by the ball sack. There is a reason Xi always has a smug prick look on his face. He knows it.
 

jasonrann

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The biggest threat to America is America. America and their policies are the only reason China is a threat at all.
Being a country of fatties with a horrendous medical system also will not help, IMHO, of course.
 
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Barnstormers Hoops

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The problem with Central America is many of the countries don't have the stability in their government to support these things. And one thing we have proven we can't do very well is provide stability for governments, at least without putting troops on the ground in that country to provide security.

I agree though, beefing up that area would help a number of issues, including illegal immigration as fewer people would be leaving. But they have things that need to be worked out first. Honestly, we just need to bring this manufacturing home. Of course that has been the solution for decades, but businesses and therefore congresspeople don't want it.
It’s never coming home, so we need to try something different than China. And places like Mexico, Costa Rica and Panama are pretty stable. They have issues with the drug trade, but that’s because it’s one of the few industries that make a lot of money. If there was more better paying jobs outside the trade people would take them and it benefits of these jobs would further stabilize the area and create less need to cross the border for work and opportunities.
 

CarolinaHawkeye

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It’s never coming home, so we need to try something different than China. And places like Mexico, Costa Rica and Panama are pretty stable. They have issues with the drug trade, but that’s because it’s one of the few industries that make a lot of money. If there was more better paying jobs outside the trade people would take them and it benefits of these jobs would further stabilize the area and create less need to cross the border for work and opportunities.
FWIW, and it's not worth much in here, but Harris' border policy has been to focus on this. Not that it matters to the right, and to be fair, most of the left.
 

SoDakHawk

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lets start holding the feet of corporations that prop up china’s economy and sell out our supply chain to them for profit to the fire.

American consumers….are you willing to make the personal sacrifice of not purchasing chinese made goods?
I think people would because they are sick of buying crap that breaks and wears out in a couple of years and I think most Americans understand the threat that China poses, at least they should.

Also, decoupling form China doesn't mean bring it all home and stop importing. It means doing business in other areas of the world and not putting all our eggs in the China basket. We can bring some manufacturing home, especially that which is vital to national security and healthcare (like pharmaceuticals), and we can find other partners in India, SE Asia, Central and South America, and Mexico that can handle some manufacturing.
 

joelbc1

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you can’t always get what you want!
It’s never coming home, so we need to try something different than China. And places like Mexico, Costa Rica and Panama are pretty stable. They have issues with the drug trade, but that’s because it’s one of the few industries that make a lot of money. If there was more better paying jobs outside the trade people would take them and it benefits of these jobs would further stabilize the area and create less need to cross the border for work and opportunities.
The trouble is, the rep of the US in Central America is not really sterling! We have treated this region of the world as our own little playground… and a lot of those folks really don’t like us that much. China Dan go into that part of tge witkd and concentrate on doing business there… the US has a whole lot of (colonial) baggage it drags with it.
 

Barnstormers Hoops

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The trouble is, the rep of the US in Central America is not really sterling! We have treated this region of the world as our own little playground… and a lot of those folks really don’t like us that much. China Dan go into that part of tge witkd and concentrate on doing business there… the US has a whole lot of (colonial) baggage it drags with it.
True to an extent, but I have been to many of these places and they love Americans for the most part. There is likely some hard feelings from some especially at the government level, but money and jobs can help fix that in a hurry.
 
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sober_teacher

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For the most part, yes. So were the trade wars.
It’s not the trade wars Trump started I didn’t like per se, but rather that he seemingly viewed tariffs as his only weapon in a 1v1 battle.

Whereas if he’d stayed in TPP, he’d have been able to have that that in the war chest to use, plus most of the pacific/Asian nations would have happily signed on to keep China in check.

But Trump just never viewed foreign policy issues that way, everything had to have a winner and a loser.
 

23 so far

HR Heisman
Mar 24, 2016
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China Threat

60 Minutes segment from last Sunday, FBI Director Wray says:
1. China is biggest threat to the US
2. China targeting innovation, trade secrets and intellectual property
3. China has stole more personal and corporate data from US than every other nation combined
4. FBI starts a new China investigation every 12 hours
60 Minutes? They need to change their name to CNN Lite or Whacked Out Lib's Central. Weird the amount of shit they "omit" ( wink, wink) from their "subjective" (wink,wink) reporting.

Aside from that, the greatest threat to America is those crazy hoards of White Supremacists running amok across the U.S.A. LOL!

How do I know this? Because Sleepy Joe said so, and when Sleepy Joe says something you can bet your ass he's spot on. LOL! Makes you wonder if Sleepy is auditioning for SNL for his next gig.
 
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luvmyhawks

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It’s not the trade wars Trump started I didn’t like per se, but rather that he seemingly viewed tariffs as his only weapon in a 1v1 battle.

Whereas if he’d stayed in TPP, he’d have been able to have that that in the war chest to use, plus most of the pacific/Asian nations would have happily signed on to keep China in check.

But Trump just never viewed foreign policy issues that way, everything had to have a winner and a loser.

Oh, I agree 100%. It was not very well thought out at all.
 
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West Dundee Hawkeye

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It’s not the trade wars Trump started I didn’t like per se, but rather that he seemingly viewed tariffs as his only weapon in a 1v1 battle.

Whereas if he’d stayed in TPP, he’d have been able to have that that in the war chest to use, plus most of the pacific/Asian nations would have happily signed on to keep China in check.

But Trump just never viewed foreign policy issues that way, everything had to have a winner and a loser.
Respectfully disagree. There are 3 main trade strategies to protect your domestic workers. They are:

1. China strategy - use cybertheft, currency manipulation, and state owned enterprise subsidies
2. French strategy - high tariffs
3. German strategy - high SAVINGS rate as Germany runs Current Account Surplus at 8% of GDP.

If you believe in the Law of Supply and Demand the economic formula that applies is:

Savings-Investment=Exports-Imports

Free trade (no tariffs) with high consumption, leads to massive trade deficits and crushes a countries working class.

The best way to increase savings is to stop running budget deficits and start paying down the $27 Trillion National Debt. Budget deficits are dis-savings.
 

joelbc1

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you can’t always get what you want!
It’s not the trade wars Trump started I didn’t like per se, but rather that he seemingly viewed tariffs as his only weapon in a 1v1 battle.

Whereas if he’d stayed in TPP, he’d have been able to have that that in the war chest to use, plus most of the pacific/Asian nations would have happily signed on to keep China in check.

But Trump just never viewed foreign policy issues that way, everything had to have a winner and a loser.
But TPP was an Obama deal and we all know the disdain Trump had for all things Obama. But u are correct…TPP would have kept us “in touch” with Red China and closer to our Asian trade partners. Trump’s decision to blow it up just pissed of trade partners and left them wondering what America was going to do in Asia.
 
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