Forward Party

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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So I see Yang/Whitman are announcing an attempt to form a centrist third party (Forward). First off, good luck with that, as they'll need a lot of it. Second, I'll be interested to hear what they have to say and who they can pull in. If they were ever able to get someone like Warner, who could probably actually afford to jump and who has lamented the absence of a middle in his public pronouncements, I'd be really really interested. Third, while I have historically been of the view that a proliferation of parties is not necessarily a good thing in the long run, I am open to anything that might break the major parties away from the extremist tribal game they've been playing for the last decade or two
 

ConvenientParking

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Jun 28, 2016
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It doesn't make much sense to me. Seems like a grift. I don't hate the democracy reforms on the platform, but it seems the strategy is to explicitly infiltrate the two major parties to make it easier for 3rd party candidates. It's kinda like needing the CEO to vote yea for the union.
 
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HawkeyeGenius

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Yang has some really good and intriguing ideas. He was never able to gain much traction though. The political power brokers will crush any third party attempt.
 

cigaretteman

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May 29, 2001
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David Jolly is a former Republican congressman from Florida and is executive chairman of the Serve America Movement. Christine Todd Whitman is a former Republican governor of New Jersey and co-founder of the Renew America Movement. Andrew Yang is a former Democratic presidential candidate and is co-chair of the Forward Party.

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Political extremism is ripping our nation apart, and the two major parties have failed to remedy the crisis. Last week, the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack at the Capitol led us to relive one of the darkest days in U.S. history. The chilling culmination of an attempted electoral coup in the United States was the strongest evidence yet that we are facing the potential demise of our democracy.
Polarization is fueling a spike in political intimidation. In the past two years, we’ve seen death threats and assassination plots against members of Congress, governors, Supreme Court justices and even the vice president of the United States.



If nothing is done, the United States will not reach its 300th birthday this century in recognizable form. That’s why we are coming together — Democrats, Republicans and independents — to build a new, unifying political party for the majority of Americans who want to move past divisiveness and reject extremism.
Americans have lost faith in government. Nearly 8 in 10 say the country is headed in the wrong direction, according to a recent survey, and two-thirds of voters think neither the Democrats nor the Republicans have the right priorities.

Shockingly, roughly 30 million Americans believe violence against the current government is justified. The same number want to forcibly return former president Donald Trump to the White House. This is what happens when democracies fail: People feel their voices are not heard and radicalize to take up arms, leading to mainstream talk about “civil war.”



How do you remedy such a crisis? In a system torn apart by two increasingly divided extremes, you must reintroduce choice and competition.
The United States badly needs a new political party — one that reflects the moderate, common-sense majority. Today’s outdated parties have failed by catering to the fringes. As a result, most Americans feel they aren’t represented.
Most third parties in U.S. history failed to take off, either because they were ideologically too narrow or the population was uninterested. But voters are calling for a new party now more than ever.
Perry Bacon Jr.: The U.S. has four political parties stuffed into a two-party system. That’s a big problem.
For the first time in modern history, roughly half of Americans consider themselves “independents,” and two-thirds say a new party is needed (and would vote for it). Surprisingly, a majority of Democrats and Republicans say they want another option, too.







As leaders and former elected officials, we’re tired of just talking about a third way. So this month, we’re merging our three national organizations — which represent the left, right, and center of the political spectrum — to build the launchpad for a new political party called Forward.
The two major parties have hollowed out the sensible center of our political system — even though that’s where most voters want to see them move. A new party must stake out the space in between. On every issue facing this nation — from the controversial to the mundane — we can find a reasonable approach most Americans agree on.
On guns, for instance, most Americans don’t agree with calls from the far left to confiscate all guns and repeal the Second Amendment, but they’re also rightfully worried by the far right’s insistence on eliminating gun laws. On climate change, most Americans don’t agree with calls from the far left to completely upend our economy and way of life, but they also reject the far right’s denial that there is even a problem. On abortion, most Americans don’t agree with the far left’s extreme views on late-term abortions, but they also are alarmed by the far right’s quest to make a woman’s choice a criminal offense.



To succeed, a new party must break down the barriers that stand between voters and more political choices. Accordingly, we will passionately advocate electoral changes such as ranked-choice voting and open primaries; for the end of gerrymandering; and for the nationwide protection of voting rights and a push to make voting remarkably easy for anyone and incredibly secure for everyone.
Without such systemic changes, Americans will be left with a closed system and fewer options on the ballot. These reforms go hand in hand with a new party.
Some call third parties “spoilers,” but the system is already spoiled. There are more than 500,000 elected positions in the United States, but a recent study found more than 70 percent of races on ballots in 2020 were unopposed or uncontested. A tiny sliver of U.S. congressional seats will have close races this November. The two major parties have shut out competition, and America is suffering as a result.



That’s why we’re proposing the first “open” party. Americans of all stripes — Democrats, Republicans and independents — are invited to be a part of the process, without abandoning their existing political affiliations, by joining us to discuss building an optimistic and inclusive home for the politically homeless majority.
Our merged organizations are just the starting point, the launchpad for this movement. We are planning liftoff at a national convention next summer and will soon seek state-by-state ballot access to run candidates in 2024 and beyond. We are actively recruiting former U.S. representatives, governors, entrepreneurs, top political operatives and community leaders to make it happen.
America’s founders warned about the dangers of a two-party system. Today, we’re living with the dire consequences. Giving Americans more choices is important not just for restoring civility. Our lives, our livelihoods and our way of life depend on it.

 
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Aardvark86

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There’s no way on earth they would have the clout or war chest to compete with the other 2. The exact same problem the other 100 third parties have had.
True in terms of absolute magnitude, but they claim to be quite comfortable with their financial picture. Again, if they end up looking serious, I’d make an exception to my usual rule against party donations and kick in.
 

alaskanseminole

HR Legend
Oct 20, 2002
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Ya, just saw this and almost bought a round of Pepsi for all:

 

alaskanseminole

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Oct 20, 2002
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Normally I gravitate toward third parties, but now is not the time. I'm willing to do anything to prevent Trump or a Trump-tainted candidate from becoming President, which means voting for the Democratic candidate, whomever that may be.

The GOP is all for it, I'm sure.
I'd certainly love it if a third party candidate won the White house leaving the Dems & Reps standing there like this:

giphy.gif
 
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lucas80

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Jan 30, 2008
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True in terms of absolute magnitude, but they claim to be quite comfortable with their financial picture. Again, if they end up looking serious, I’d make an exception to my usual rule against party donations and kick in.
More than anything they seem to have a 50 state plan. Most 3rd party attempts fail to be relevant in all corners of the country.
My guess is if they gain some traction they wind up helping the Trump cult.
 

lucas80

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Jan 30, 2008
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Off the top of my head I cannot recall a time where there was ever more than two effective parties in the US. We seem geared towards it. We don't have a parliamentarian system that would be conducive to 2+ parties at work.
That being said, if you want more effective government in the US do not hold your breath until there is comprehensive campaign finance reform, term limits, the elimination of gerrymandering, and iron clad rules against going directly from elected office to lobbying and think tank grifting. As I have posted many, many times, if I was in charge of DC I'd force every member of Congress to live in dormitories. Oh, they'd be nice, and be kid friendly, but I'd force them to live together. Preferably they'd leave their families back home. But, if they had to share a laundry room and cafeteria they'd get more done, and they'd do it quickly.
 

alaskanseminole

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Oct 20, 2002
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As I have posted many, many times, if I was in charge of DC I'd force every member of Congress to live in dormitories. Oh, they'd be nice, and be kid friendly, but I'd force them to live together. Preferably they'd leave their families back home. But, if they had to share a laundry room and cafeteria they'd get more done, and they'd do it quickly.
That's a lot of typing just to say you'd make them wear this:

(and I agree with you)

c6b.jpg
 

seminole97

HR Legend
Jun 14, 2005
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I'd certainly love it if a third party candidate won the White house leaving the Dems & Reps standing there like this:

giphy.gif
I SOOOO wanted to see Ross Perot walk out of a budget meeting with Gingrinch and lay out exactly what was discussed.

It. Would. Have. Been. Awesome.