Fourth Pfizer Dose Slashed Risk of Catching Omicron in Study

Kenneth Griffin

HR Legend
Jan 13, 2012
11,625
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Hospital workers who got a fourth dose of Pfizer Inc.’s messenger RNA vaccine were far less likely to get Covid than triple-vaccinated peers in a study.
The findings published Tuesday in the American Medical Association’s open access journal are the latest to confirm the benefits of a second booster against breakthrough infections caused by omicron. The study’s authors pointed to an extra dose as a tool to prevent medical staff shortages and spare health systems in times of strain.

The research was conducted in Israel, where a speedy vaccine roll-out has provided scientists with real-world data on vaccine efficacy. The country started offering a second booster to the elderly, health workers and those with weakened immune systems in January.
The US is now considering whether to expand eligibility for second booster shots amid the spread of the BA.5 omicron variant.
Read More: US Considering Expanding Second Boosters to All Adults

Doctors, nurses and other health-care workers who got a fourth mRNA shot in January showed a 7% rate of breakthrough infections. Those with three doses -- the third having been administered by the end of September -- saw an infection rate of 20%.

Many health workers in Israel opted not to get a fourth dose in January, the scientists said, assuming it wouldn’t make much of a difference.
“The common assumption was that the combination of reduced virulence of the omicron variant and the protection given by the first three vaccine doses created no added value for the fourth vaccine,” they wrote. But for medical staff, they argued such a difference matters because “quarantine and isolation of a large number of health-care workers may impair the ability of the health system to function.”

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Finance85

HR Legend
Oct 22, 2003
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Joes Place

HR King
Aug 28, 2003
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Fauci and Biden must have gotten placebos.

Effectiveness drops dramatically after 6 - 8 weeks.

Then there's this - https://www.healthline.com/health-news/why-a-4th-covid-19-shot-likely-wont-provide-more-protection

And this https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...shots-risk-overloading-immune-system-ema-says

It should be a decision between each person and their doctor, based on age, health, and other factors.
Your references are older

JAMA reference just came out this week.
 

globalhawk

HR Heisman
Dec 16, 2003
5,253
5,705
113
Fauci and Biden must have gotten placebos.

Effectiveness drops dramatically after 6 - 8 weeks.

Then there's this - https://www.healthline.com/health-news/why-a-4th-covid-19-shot-likely-wont-provide-more-protection

And this https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...shots-risk-overloading-immune-system-ema-says

It should be a decision between each person and their doctor, based on age, health, and other factors.
Yep. Many decisions should be between each person and their doctor.
 

Funky Bunch

HR Legend
Mar 30, 2011
25,482
40,535
113
Fauci and Biden must have gotten placebos.

Effectiveness drops dramatically after 6 - 8 weeks.

Then there's this - https://www.healthline.com/health-news/why-a-4th-covid-19-shot-likely-wont-provide-more-protection

And this https://www.bloomberg.com/news/arti...shots-risk-overloading-immune-system-ema-says

It should be a decision between each person and their doctor, based on age, health, and other factors.
Why waste a copay when we have you in every thread telling us it isn't effective?
 

DogBoyRy

HR Legend
Jul 28, 2006
10,357
7,034
113
Hospital workers who got a fourth dose of Pfizer Inc.’s messenger RNA vaccine were far less likely to get Covid than triple-vaccinated peers in a study.
The findings published Tuesday in the American Medical Association’s open access journal are the latest to confirm the benefits of a second booster against breakthrough infections caused by omicron. The study’s authors pointed to an extra dose as a tool to prevent medical staff shortages and spare health systems in times of strain.

The research was conducted in Israel, where a speedy vaccine roll-out has provided scientists with real-world data on vaccine efficacy. The country started offering a second booster to the elderly, health workers and those with weakened immune systems in January.
The US is now considering whether to expand eligibility for second booster shots amid the spread of the BA.5 omicron variant.
Read More: US Considering Expanding Second Boosters to All Adults

Doctors, nurses and other health-care workers who got a fourth mRNA shot in January showed a 7% rate of breakthrough infections. Those with three doses -- the third having been administered by the end of September -- saw an infection rate of 20%.

Many health workers in Israel opted not to get a fourth dose in January, the scientists said, assuming it wouldn’t make much of a difference.
“The common assumption was that the combination of reduced virulence of the omicron variant and the protection given by the first three vaccine doses created no added value for the fourth vaccine,” they wrote. But for medical staff, they argued such a difference matters because “quarantine and isolation of a large number of health-care workers may impair the ability of the health system to function.”

The latest in health, medicine and science — and what it means for you.The latest in health, medicine and science — and what it means for you.The latest in health, medicine and science — and what it means for you.
Get the latest from Bloomberg’s global team of health reporters with the Prognosis newsletter.Get the latest from Bloomberg’s global team of health reporters with the Prognosis newsletter.Get the latest from Bloomberg’s global team of health reporters with the Prognosis newsletter.
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Fricking gold.
Thanks
 
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LBoogie28

HR All-American
Feb 5, 2007
2,879
3,202
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Duke Medical School just announced their trial, which has been going on for awhile. I guess they could have saved some money and just asked Joes Place what the result will be.

Meanwhile, here's a link to a compilation of various studies - https://c19ivermectin.com/

Because it's been made political, if it does turn out that ivermectin is effective under some circumstances, the left will simply dismiss or ignore the evidence, just as they've done with other things that don't support their narrative.
“Because it's been made political, if it does turn out that ivermectin is effective under some circumstances, the left will simply dismiss or ignore the evidence, just as they've done with other things that don't support their narrative.”

What did the Duke study say? What do you say now your narrative isn’t supported?
 

Joes Place

HR King
Aug 28, 2003
123,480
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“Because it's been made political, if it does turn out that ivermectin is effective under some circumstances, the left will simply dismiss or ignore the evidence, just as they've done with other things that don't support their narrative.”

What did the Duke study say? What do you say now your narrative isn’t supported?
He's gonna up and vanish like a fart in the wind.
 

Bill Doak and 9 others

All-Conference
Jun 6, 2022
497
389
63
Weird how those booster shots work

#PeopleGet4to5PolioShotsAsKids
Always with the polio take.

Polio regiment consists of four shots in FOUR TO SIX YEARS, and theoretically results in, you know.....immunity.

Covid protocol is four shots (so far) in approximately 18 months....with no end in sight....and no immunity. But hey, it might keep you out of the hospital and keep you from dying.
 

RonaldMexico

HR MVP
Aug 11, 2020
1,306
2,240
113
I am confused. Are we still trying to protect the healthcare system? Maybe flatten the curve? What is happening that people should run out and get the shot if they don’t want to?
 

Joes Place

HR King
Aug 28, 2003
123,480
117,883
113
I am confused. Are we still trying to protect the healthcare system? Maybe flatten the curve? What is happening that people should run out and get the shot if they don’t want to?
 

pjhawk

HR Legend
Oct 13, 2001
17,001
8,957
113
Always with the polio take.

Polio regiment consists of four shots in FOUR TO SIX YEARS, and theoretically results in, you know.....immunity.

Covid protocol is four shots (so far) in approximately 18 months....with no end in sight....and no immunity. But hey, it might keep you out of the hospital and keep you from dying.
Who cares? Why is the number of shots you have to get such a big deal? I know it's what you're being told over and over and over in MAGA media but could you people just stop and THINK about it for at least half a second? Who cares?
 
Nov 28, 2010
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Maryland
Doctors, nurses and other health-care workers who got a fourth mRNA shot in January showed a 7% rate of breakthrough infections. Those with three doses -- the third having been administered by the end of September -- saw an infection rate of 20%.
Not clear to me whether the extra protection is due to the number of shots (4 vs 3) or the recency of the last shot (January or the previous September).

Did they tease that out anywhere?
 
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hawkeye54545

HR Legend
Gold Member
Apr 25, 2005
21,174
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I've already spent 4 days in bed from the first 3 shots, no need to find out how long i'd be in bed for if I got a 4th
Pretty much the same.

I had the OG Covid two years ago in October with very mild symptoms. I got the vaccine and booster last August and September and was as down as I've ever been. Caught Covid again a few weeks ago and was just sore and tired.

No more shots for me. I'm fine with whatever everyone else does.
 
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hydro2.0

HR All-American
Jun 25, 2018
3,391
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Pretty much the same.

I had the OG Covid two years ago in October with very mild symptoms. I got the vaccine and booster last August and September and was as down as I've ever been. Caught Covid again a few weeks ago and was just sore and tired.

No more shots for me. I'm fine with whatever everyone else does.

Exactly. I simply do not care anymore
 
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Joes Place

HR King
Aug 28, 2003
123,480
117,883
113
What remains different for now, however, is that SARS-2 is still killing hundreds of Americans each day.

Average daily deaths have rarely dipped below 300 since last summer. More recently, as the latest Omicron subvariant BA.5 fueled another burst of transmission on top of an elevated plateau of cases, deaths have surpassed 400 a day (though the BA.5 wave appears to have crested). Such levels are far higher than those seen with other respiratory viruses, especially in the summer.

“It’s something that, because we’ve been in this pandemic for so long, we can easily get jaded to,” said Jonathan Abraham, an infectious diseases physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

Perhaps more worrisome is the fact that many experts don’t foresee much change anytime soon. While there will be ups and downs, some forecasts project 100,000 annual Covid deaths, if not more, for the next several years. Ignoring seasonal variation, that’s some 275 deaths a day.

“It’s hard for me to see, barring any massive change in the way we’re treating the virus right now or trying to manage it, that anything inherent to the virus is really going to change much,” said Stephen Kissler, an epidemiologist at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “We’re going to continue to see the emergence of variants, we’re going to continue to see spread outside the winter months, we’re probably going to see more spread in winter months in temperate regions — basically any time people are crowding indoors.”

What that means, Kissler said, is that going forward, Covid could generate two to three bad flu seasons’ worth of deaths each year.

That won’t necessarily be the case forever. Many experts see SARS-2 retreating to something more on par with the other human coronaviruses as we keep building up additional layers of immunity. But how long that process takes — three years? five years? 10 years? — remains an open question.