Glyphosate Found in 19 of 20 Beers and Wines Tested

cigaretteman

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May 29, 2001
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Glyphosate—the active ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller that some studies have linked to cancer—is also a secret ingredient in nearly 20 popular beers and wines.

That's the finding of a new study from the education group U.S. PIRG, which found glyphosate in 19 of 20 wine and beer brands tested, including organic labels and brews.



The release of the study coincides with the beginning of the first federal trial against Monsanto and its new parent company Bayer over whether Roundup use caused a plaintiff's cancer, USA Today reported Monday.

"With a federal court looking at the connection between Roundup and cancer today, we believe this is the perfect time to shine a spotlight on glyphosate," study author and U.S. PIRG Toxic's Director Kara Cook-Schultz told USA Today. "This chemical could prove a true risk to so many Americans' health, and they should know that it is everywhere – including in many of their favorite drinks."

The drink with the highest glyphosate concentration was Sutter Home Merlot, at 51.4 parts per billion (ppb). Popular beer brands like Coors Light, Miller Lite and Budweiser all had concentrations above 25 ppb. The full results of the study, from highest to lowest glyphosate concentration in ppb, are listed below.

Wines

  1. Sutter Home Merlot: 51.4 ppb
  2. Beringer Founders Estates Moscato: 42.6 ppb
  3. Barefoot Cabernet Sauvignon: 36.3 ppb
  4. Inkarri Malbec, Certified Organic: 5.3 ppb
  5. Frey Organic Natural White: 4.8 ppb
Beers

  1. Tsingtao Beer: 49.7 ppb
  2. Coors Light: 31.1 ppb
  3. Miller Lite: 29.8 ppb
  4. Budweiser: 27.0 ppb
  5. Corona Extra: 25.1 ppb
  6. Heineken: 20.9 ppb
  7. Guinness Draught: 20.3 ppb
  8. Stella Artois: 18.7 ppb
  9. Ace Perry Hard Cider: 14.5 ppb
  10. Sierra Nevada Pale Ale: 11.8 ppb
  11. New Belgium Fat Tire Amber Ale: 11.2 ppb
  12. Sam Adams New England IPA: 11.0 ppb
  13. Stella Artois Cidre: 9.1 ppb
  14. Samuel Smith's Organic Lager: 5.7 ppb
The only beverage tested that contained no glyphosate was Peak Beer Organic IPA.

The amounts found were far below the safety limits for glyphosate set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as Bayer toxicologist William Reeves told CBS News via a spokesperson.

"The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets daily exposure limits at least 100 times below levels shown to have no negative effect in safety studies," Reeves said. "Assuming the greatest value reported, 51.4 ppb, is correct, a 125-pound adult would have to consume 308 gallons of wine per day, every day for life to reach the US Environmental Protection Agency's glyphosate exposure limit for humans. To put 308 gallons into context, that would be more than a bottle of wine every minute, for life, without sleeping."

However, the study noted that chemicals aren't necessarily safe just because regulatory bodies say they are.

"While these levels of glyphosate are below EPA risk tolerances for beverages, it is possible that even low levels of glyphosate can be problematic. For example, in one study, scientists found that 1 part per trillion of glyphosate has the potential to stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells and disrupt the endocrine system," the study said.

The EPA has found that glyphosate is not carcinogenic to humans, but the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer ruled it was a probable human carcinogen in 2015. More recently, a study released February found that those exposed to glyphosate were 41 percent more likely to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

In the first case to go to trial against Monsanto over Roundup last year, a jury ruled that exposure to glyphosate had caused the non-Hodgkin lymphoma of California groundskeeper Dewayne Johnson. Plaintiff Edwin Hardeman is making a similar claim in the first federal glyphosate trial that started Monday.

"Due to glyphosate's many health risks and its ubiquitous nature in our food, water and alcohol, the use of glyphosate in the U.S. should be banned unless and until it can be proven safe," the U.S. PIRG study advised.

https://www.ecowatch.com/glyphosate...agO08M_GYHFCKK-8ziehL_Q3eNBXIAp-IQk0JUPBD5nxY
 

Run&Blade

HR Legend
May 6, 2005
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I hope they invent roundup ready grass before it’s illegal. I would love to just shoot my entire yard with roundup and reap the benefits.

If they could make the grass able to handle the roundup concentrate that would be great. I hate farting around with beakers of water to get the mixture correct.
 

IACub

HR Legend
Sep 25, 2009
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Iowa City, IA
"Assuming the greatest value reported, 51.4 ppb, is correct, a 125-pound adult would have to consume 308 gallons of wine per day, every day for life to reach the US Environmental Protection Agency's glyphosate exposure limit for humans. To put 308 gallons into context, that would be more than a bottle of wine every minute, for life, without sleeping."

Game on, bitches.
 

sadiehawkins

HR All-American
Sep 21, 2008
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I hope they invent roundup ready grass before it’s illegal. I would love to just shoot my entire yard with roundup and reap the benefits.

If they could make the grass able to handle
the roundup concentrate that would be great. I hate farting around with beakers of water to get the mixture correct.
I believe they have that but chose not to go that route because they were worried about it taking over farm fields. if i remember right it was done at first for golf course's and i think the study was done in oregon.
 

Run&Blade

HR Legend
May 6, 2005
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I believe they have that but chose not to go that route because they were worried about it taking over farm fields. if i remember right it was done at first for golf course's and i think the study was done in oregon.
That sucks. My yard would have been easier.
 

soybean

HR King
Sep 30, 2001
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I hope they invent roundup ready grass before it’s illegal. I would love to just shoot my entire yard with roundup and reap the benefits.

If they could make the grass able to handle the roundup concentrate that would be great. I hate farting around with beakers of water to get the mixture correct.

5093a9b7-fc78-43a8-a509-677333d78abb
 
Nov 28, 2010
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"The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sets daily exposure limits at least 100 times below levels shown to have no negative effect in safety studies," Reeves said. "Assuming the greatest value reported, 51.4 ppb, is correct, a 125-pound adult would have to consume 308 gallons of wine per day, every day for life to reach the US Environmental Protection Agency's glyphosate exposure limit for humans.
1. All of a sudden we think the EPA has been doing a good job and isn't in the pockets of the industries it regulates?

2. Thanks to the so-called Monsanto Protection Act, levels of glyphosate in foods are now as much as 25 times higher than they used to be. By law, not science. This clever pitch by the Bayer/Monsanto shill assumes you trust limits that you know have been politically.

3. This clever pitch by the Bayer/Monsanto shill not only assumes you trust limits that you know have been politically relaxed, it ALSO assumes that you don't get glyphosate from other sources. But you do. Lots and lots of other sources. The point of articles like the OP is that you are getting them right and left, including from many foods and even sources you wouldn't even think of, like cotton.
 
Nov 28, 2010
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This one is for women only.


Note that the point is NOT that the cotton is GMO. That's probably OK. No, the problem is that this particular genetic modification is apparently to permit the use of Roundup. She doesn't actually say that, but it's a reasonable inference from the data she presents.
 
Nov 28, 2010
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LA County bans Monsanto weed killer citing health concerns

Los Angeles County this week issued a moratorium on the use of Monsanto's Roundup weed killer, citing the need for more research into its active ingredient, an NBC News affiliate reported.

More than 50 U.S. cities and counties have banned the chemical, the most commonly used herbicide in the world.

Across the country, Bayer AG, which bought Monsanto last year, faces more than 11,000 similar lawsuits alleging that glyphosate causes cancer.

The World Health Organization in 2015 classified glyphosate as a "probable human carcinogen.” The Environmental Protection Agency says the weed killer has low toxicity for humans is not likely to cause cancer.

https://thehill.com/policy/energy-e...ns-monsanto-weedkiller-citing-health-concerns
 

ihhawk

HR Legend
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Roundup changed farming forever. Some good ways and some bad ways.

Roundup has allowed for farmers to farm more acres which I personally dont think is a positive. Im more of smaller farm type person.

It has however done wonders for soil conservation which is a good thing.
 
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Run&Blade

HR Legend
May 6, 2005
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Roundup changed farming forever. Some good ways and some bad ways.

Roundup has allowed for farmers to farm more acres which I personally dont think is a positive. Im more of smaller farm type person.

It has however done wonders for soil conservation which is a good thing.
In ended ‘walking beans’ in a hurry.

I am amazed they haven’t bio engineered seed corn so that detasseling would be no longer needed.
 

Run&Blade

HR Legend
May 6, 2005
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Oh hello no. Walking beans is not enjoyable and it is done in July and August
Bla. 3 / 4 hours in morning is all I am thinking.

Not cranking out 12 hours with some high school drop out supervisor on a power trip.
 

Sooner-Be-Dead

HR Heisman
Sep 2, 2003
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My only issue with organic is that it takes way more fuel. Way more. You are also moving iron through the field a large amount.
Is it efficient? No. But the younger generation is willing to pay up for food they deem as better quality, and the actual production cost of food is what, 10-20% of the retail price?
 

ihhawk

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Is it efficient? No. But the younger generation is willing to pay up for food they deem as better quality, and the actual production cost of food is what, 10-20% of the retail price?
I think the conversation needs to be broken down further. Produce sent to the farmers market is a different scenario. That can be done well on a small scale without many changes in overall tillage.

Corn and Soybean production is way different.
 

HIWB

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Feb 13, 2012
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Is it efficient? No. But the younger generation is willing to pay up for food they deem as better quality, and the actual production cost of food is what, 10-20% of the retail price?

That’s the paradox of the thing. Organic “seems” healthier and better quality, when it really isn’t, all the while being potentially worse for the environment.
 

Sooner-Be-Dead

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Sep 2, 2003
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I think the conversation needs to be broken down further. Produce sent to the farmers market is a different scenario. That can be done well on a small scale without many changes in overall tillage.

Corn and Soybean production is way different.
Tough to come up with enough organic N for a large % of current corn production. Tillage wouldn't be too bad for corn. Beans won't be easy to keep the weeds out of, but for $30/bushel more farmers will figure it out.
 

ihhawk

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Feb 4, 2004
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Tough to come up with enough organic N for a large % of current corn production. Tillage wouldn't be too bad for corn. Beans won't be easy to keep the weeds out of, but for $30/bushel more farmers will figure it out.
The farmer I worked for has a 100 acre property that he keeps organic. The rest is all conventional. He rotates corn, alfalfa, and beans. The beans fail every year.

You have to plow in the fall to try to get the weed seeds plowed under. In the spring, you have to disc, usually twice, and then take the soil finisher over it right before planting. Post planting and right when the sprouts come out, you need to take the rotary hoe over the field. We would then cultivate every two weeks until the rows filled in. Usually ended up being 4 to 5 times. Then you have to start walking the beans because of middle of the row water hemp or button weeds.

I swear to god we spent more time on 40 acres of beans than we did his other 800 acres of beans. We would no till those and spray twice.
 
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