Golfers - question about lessons

Feb 9, 2013
21,127
59,221
113
I need to take some lessons to work on one area of my game, but never have had one.

I also want an instructor who can tweak my swing/provide some tips and not feel the need to break it down and rebuild from scratch, with dozens of lessons. I don’t care that much. I just want a simple, repeatable swing that allows for more consistency. I also don’t want some place that tries to convince me I need new clubs or I won’t improve. I’m a big believer in the saying it’s the archer, not the arrows.

Is that a discussion you have when you book, or do you book and then discuss at the first lesson? I am willing to try a few instructors if necessary.

Thanks for any insight
 

Moral

HR Legend
Sep 29, 2017
25,953
80,544
113
Make sure on the phone that they aren’t one of those instructors that gets behind you, wrap their hands around yours and push into you to help with your swing. Basically done with golf because that kept happening to me.
 
Feb 9, 2013
21,127
59,221
113
Bump for daytime golfers

@Finance85 @NoleinATL @St. Louis Hawk @joelbc1 Any others?

Found one instructor but need to research qualifications
EaHvQXrWAAAMGQz.jpg
 

Rifler

HR Legend
Jan 26, 2011
25,750
20,856
113
I need to take some lessons to work on one area of my game, but never have had one.

I also want an instructor who can tweak my swing/provide some tips and not feel the need to break it down and rebuild from scratch, with dozens of lessons. I don’t care that much. I just want a simple, repeatable swing that allows for more consistency. I also don’t want some place that tries to convince me I need new clubs or I won’t improve. I’m a big believer in the saying it’s the archer, not the arrows.

Is that a discussion you have when you book, or do you book and then discuss at the first lesson? I am willing to try a few instructors if necessary.

Thanks for any insight

An honest instructor is going to tell you that they won't know what you need until they see your swing,.. Select an instructor, show him what you've got and then discuss next steps.
 

thewop

HR Legend
Jun 27, 2002
17,970
15,705
113
If you have a specific ask and need to work on a specific thing, ask for that specific thing.

I'm a 4 index, and was hitting it straight, but my alignment was not good. I couldn't confidently get my feet aligned to target so I was missing greens way too often. I asked him to look at my alignment. He liked my ball flight, but did find some things he would change with my swing. I told him no swing changes because I play 9 holes a week and I don't have time to practice.

Ultimately he told me that there's nothing wrong with being a 4 when you really don't get a chance to play that much, but if I ever could focus more time on it he felt like I could make a few changes that would really help.

It was good, but I know if I'd not been very specific about what I wanted at the beginning, he'd have gone a different direction.

If you're a 20 though...I'd say just let him go to town and take all the lessons you need.
 

NoleinATL

HR Legend
Oct 29, 2006
23,006
7,583
113
Bump for daytime golfers

@Finance85 @NoleinATL @St. Louis Hawk @joelbc1 Any others?

Found one instructor but need to research qualifications
EaHvQXrWAAAMGQz.jpg

Yellow nails, tattoo, and high-top Nikes, she is definitely selling you something, I would keep looking.

In the search for an instructor to fit your criteria, I would approach it the same way I do when looking for any service, be direct and honest right up front.
If you have a hitch while swinging your Nike forged blades and big bertha driver tell the guy or gal what you are looking for, which is to smooth out your swing with your current clubs. Your Muscle memory, money, and desire is not looking to hit 1000 balls a week at the range to completely change my current swing while dropping 1500 on new clubs, just needs a tweak.

Start with your local PGA pro search, the teaching has always been consistent and some have tried to upsell but have not been aggressive about it
 

EasyHawk

HR Heisman
Gold Member
Jun 21, 2015
9,869
14,858
113
I need to take some lessons to work on one area of my game, but never have had one.

I also want an instructor who can tweak my swing/provide some tips and not feel the need to break it down and rebuild from scratch, with dozens of lessons. I don’t care that much. I just want a simple, repeatable swing that allows for more consistency. I also don’t want some place that tries to convince me I need new clubs or I won’t improve. I’m a big believer in the saying it’s the archer, not the arrows.

Is that a discussion you have when you book, or do you book and then discuss at the first lesson? I am willing to try a few instructors if necessary.

Thanks for any insight
I once knew a guy who could have been a great golfer, could have gone pro, all he needed was a little time and practice. Decided to go to college instead. Went for four years, did pretty well. At the end of his four years, his last semester, he was kicked out. You know what for? He was night putting, just putting at night. . .with the fifteen-year-old daughter of the Dean. You know who that guy was, Rocky? Mitch Comstein, my roommate. He was a good guy.
 
Feb 9, 2013
21,127
59,221
113
If you have a specific ask and need to work on a specific thing, ask for that specific thing.

I'm a 4 index, and was hitting it straight, but my alignment was not good. I couldn't confidently get my feet aligned to target so I was missing greens way too often. I asked him to look at my alignment. He liked my ball flight, but did find some things he would change with my swing. I told him no swing changes because I play 9 holes a week and I don't have time to practice.

Ultimately he told me that there's nothing wrong with being a 4 when you really don't get a chance to play that much, but if I ever could focus more time on it he felt like I could make a few changes that would really help.

It was good, but I know if I'd not been very specific about what I wanted at the beginning, he'd have gone a different direction.

If you're a 20 though...I'd say just let him go to town and take all the lessons you need.
Good thoughts.
As to my skill level, let’s just say if I was a 4 I wouldn’t be bothering with lessons.
 
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thewop

HR Legend
Jun 27, 2002
17,970
15,705
113
Good thoughts.
As to my skill level, let’s just say if I was a 4 I wouldn’t be bothering with lessons.
I'd still say if you don't have the time to really practice and work through the shifty phase after the pro changes your swing, then ask for the one specific thing and be up front about it. If you have time to hit the range 3-4 times a week over the next 6 weeks and have a weekly lesson, do that and let him change your swing.

I was very clear I didn't want to make any big swing changes because I knew I wasn't going to be able to practice. For the most part I had to play the swing I had.
 
I was struggling with a persistent slice and poor chipping technique. Took 3 lessons with a young aspiring pro at a local CC last spring —- think it was like $45 a session. Mostly came down to a grip issue on the drive and a stance issue chipping.

Really made a difference. Knocked about 4 strokes off my handicap.
 

St. Louis Hawk

HR Legend
Gold Member
Feb 5, 2003
29,052
54,931
113
I told my new coach to blow it up and start from the beginning.

Took a full year to make consistent contact and ball flight.

IMHO the modern swing is so different from the loopy swing I was taught as a younger player that the change was much harder than I anticipated.

6 months in I was so frustrated that I was thinking about shutting it down but a few things finally clicked.

Good luck!
 

RileyHawk

HR Legend
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2002
37,275
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Most instructors are going to give you one or two things to adjust and get used to doing regularly. It might be your takeaway, ball position, weight transfer, etc. You'll be surprised at how much difference that one change will make. You can go from there on your own or continue to tweak. They will also give you some tips in the short game that will cut strokes.

You don't have to commit to a number of lessons or big changes. Tell them what you're looking for and they will do it. Also, if you have clubs that are more than 7 years old you should think about new. The technology gets better all the time and can be adjusted to fit your particular swing. I just bought a new driver (replaced a 4 year old model) and our pro adjusted it so it flies straighter and I gained 20 yards. I agree that overall it's the archer, but the arrows make a big difference.
 

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