Gov. J.B. Pritzker to sign measure allowing Illinois college athletes to hire agents and be paid for endorsements

cigaretteman

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Iowa will need to compete with this in recruiting:

Gov. J.B. Pritzker is poised to sign a measure into law Tuesday that would allow college athletes to sign endorsement deals, making Illinois the latest of nearly two dozen states to enact policies allowing student-athletes to profit off the use of their names and likenesses.

The signing comes a day before an NCAA vote on a proposal that would institute similar rules for schools nationwide. It also comes less than two weeks after a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down a NCAA rule prohibiting schools from offering athletes education-related benefits.

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There’s been a growing push for high-level college athletes to be able to earn some share of the profit from a multibillion-dollar industry, including an unsuccessful attempt by Northwestern University football players to unionize in 2014. The NCAA and others have fought such attempts, contending they undermine the spirit of amateur sports.

The measure that Pritzker is scheduled to sign Tuesday afternoon at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was sponsored by two former Division I football players: state Rep. Kam Buckner, a Chicago Democrat who played at Illinois, and state Sen. Napoleon Harris a Democrat from south suburban Harvey who played linebacker at Northwestern and for seven seasons in the NFL.



“For myself, as a former student-athlete, you see coaches making money, you see the administration is making money and the student-athletes are the ones that are filling the stands, but they’re not able to go and make any substantial monetary gains of their own likeness and image,” Harris said in May when the General Assembly was considering the proposal.

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“I think the colleges are now seeing the light of day and understanding the difference between student athletes being able to use their own name and image versus being employees. They’re not considered employees, and I think that’s the difference,” he said.



Under the Illinois law, which would take effect Thursday upon Pritzker’s signature, student-athletes at both public and private universities would be allowed to hire an agents to represent them in endorsement deals, and schools would be able to set “reasonable limitations” on when athletes can participate in the newly allowed activities and whether the school’s logos, uniforms or name can be used.

Athletes also would be required to report their endorsement deals and other activities to their respective schools. Boosters or other third parties would be prohibited from using the promise of endorsement deals to recruit athletes to a school.

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California passed the first such law in 2019, with the policy set to take effect in 2023. Since then, 18 others states have enacted similar policies, with laws taking effect Thursday in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico and Texas. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine issued an executive order Monday with similar provisions.

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Wednesday’s vote by the boards all three NCAA divisions is based on a recommendation from a panel composed of athletic directors and other officials to suspend rules prohibiting athletes from receiving compensation.

The proposal would suspend the current rules prohibiting athletes from being paid for the use of their name, image or likeness until the NCAA adopts a permanent policy or Congress approves a federal law.

If approved, the proposal would permit activities similar to those covered in the new Illinois law for athletes nationwide, regardless of whether their state has approved a similar policy. Athletes in the States that have passed laws would be governed by those rules.

 
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Huey Grey

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If Reynolds was smart she would follow suit. Iowa has no competition from professional teams. College athletes might flock here from the exposure they could get.
 
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LuteHawk

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Nov 30, 2011
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The University of Illinois football team will not have to
worry about paid individual endorsements. They have
not had any good athletes on their football team for
a long time. They have had no All-Americans play there
in the last decade. Look up their won/lost record, it
is a joke.
 

BioHawk

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Sep 21, 2005
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All schools will have to do that. And it won't just be for college athletes either. This will filter down to high schools as well. College sports are going to be very different animals from here on out. It could end them completely. I have no idea how this is going to shake out. I'm not sure if I will even be interested in the final product. However, as much as this might ruin my personal entertainment, it was something that needed to happen.

I should say, it is also possible that not much changes on the competitive side of things. It's just now the 5 star recruit won't have to claim that his brand new, fully loaded F150 lightning was a gift from his uncle he never knew or has met.
 

win1forthe

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Mar 12, 2004
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Already starting to see basketball players go to the G League instead of college. You are correct that college athletics will be different, it’s just a matter of how different. In football, this really will solidify the power 5 schools and I’ll really be interested to see the impact in basketball.
I was flipping through the channels the other day and caught most of a documentary by Jeremy Bloom on Vice TV about how horrible the NCAA is…worth a watch if you stumble on it.
 

Huey Grey

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Jan 15, 2013
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Cats out of the bag on this one. SCOTUS ruled college athletes can make money off their images. And you had better believe they will. How this will change college sports is anyone's guess. But I'm willing to bet that the schools who embrace athletes having this control will have a recruiting edge over schools that don't.
 
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Old_wrestling_fan

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Iowa City
All schools will have to do that. And it won't just be for college athletes either. This will filter down to high schools as well. College sports are going to be very different animals from here on out. It could end them completely. I have no idea how this is going to shake out. I'm not sure if I will even be interested in the final product. However, as much as this might ruin my personal entertainment, it was something that needed to happen.

I should say, it is also possible that not much changes on the competitive side of things. It's just now the 5 star recruit won't have to claim that his brand new, fully loaded F150 lightning was a gift from his uncle he never knew or has met.
Bolded section above...I hope you are wrong, but I am fearful that you may be right.
 

jamesvanderwulf

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Nov 27, 2015
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People's Republic of Johnson County
I OWA CITY — Iowa wide receiver Tyrone Tracy Jr.
knows he’s been deprived of his rights as a U.S. citizen. He has nine allies in the U.S. Supreme Court.
'Nowhere else in America can businesses get away with agreeing not to pay their workers a fair market rate on the theory that their product is defined by not paying their workers a fair market rate,' Justice Brett Kavanaugh wrote last week in the Court’s unanimous opinion in antitrust case NCAA v. Alston. 'And under ordinary principles of antitrust law, it is not evident why college sports should be any different.
“The NCAA is not above the law.
“The NCAA’s business model would be flatly illegal in almost any other industry in America.”
Kavanaugh added the current NCAA model is 'suppressing the pay of student athletes who collectively generate billions of dollars in revenues for colleges every year.'
It’s not if, it’s when, and the when is very soon. Rights for college athletes to make money off their names, images and likenesses are coming fast. For some, it’s July 1. It may come as soon as that even in Iowa, despite our state legislature letting an NIL bill die this spring.
Wrong side of history, Iowa politicos.
Tracy is a junior who would do well for himself if he had NIL rights this year. He’s a dynamic player who said in no uncertain terms Tuesday he wanted to be the Big Ten’s top receiver and Iowa’s first 1,000-yard receiver in the last 10 years.
He also knows the chance to
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Iowa wide receiver Tyrone Tracy Jr., laughing with teammates during the 2019 football media day, is looking forward to cashing in on his name, image and likeness. But. he said, the focus is on football. (The Gazette)
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MIKE HLAS | THE GAZETTE


Hlas/ Focus is still on the field
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make some money off his own name may be his before his college career is over.
“The reason I’m on board is I feel in college, a lot of people’s names are bigger than when they’re out of college,” Tracy said. “So I feel like if you can make money right now, you should be able to because your next step when you get out of college, you don’t know what’s going to happen.”
For those who think Iowa could lose allure with recruits if NIL opportunities were a factor in their college choices, you may want to think again.
“In Iowa we’re basically the pro team,” Tracy said. “So if we throw a camp or something, there’s basically going to be a lot of people there. I feel like with them taking that away from us, that is something that’s not good.”
With the ability to get paid for holding a football camp or an autograph session, Tracy said, “it will be a positive impact overall.”
“(If) you can get some type of income from it, that’s why this is so huge. Because for so long there’s been so many good names to come from Iowa, come from Oklahoma or Alabama, everywhere. I feel like every year there are people that lose out on opportunities.
“This is literally a once-ina- lifetime opportunity for a lot of people that don’t come from a lot of money back home. This money can help their families back home. Some people don’t understand that.”
Nobody goes to a play to watch a stage manager, no one goes to a concert to watch people run the lights and sound, no one goes to a game to watch coaches coach and administrators administrate.
The players are the show. This isn’t about them getting paid by the university. This is about being able to cash in on their own, even if it’s sometimes in dribs and drabs. It’s about being able to join the rest of the nation in free enterprise.
Athletics departments and coaching staffs already have begun to accept it and deal with it.
“I think most of us will be learning as we go,” said Iowa Coach Kirk Ferentz. “It also appears most of us are going to be partnering up with experts. Some smart people on the outside have seen this coming and maybe capitalized on an opportunity.
“I know in my case and probably our coaching staff’s case, we’re really leaning on people who do understand the ins and outs of this.”
A company called Opendorse has deals with many universities, including several from the Big Ten, to help college athletes capitalize on their own names, images and likenesses. Every athletics department will be on board, whether happily or not, and Iowa took the plunge Friday.
Oh, here’s something warm to close this on for Hawkeye fans: “Right now we’re just focused on football,” Tracy said. “I don’t want to lose sight of the big picture.”

Hard to argue against this take. I hope Alabama doesn't take advantage ...
 

NoleinATL

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Oct 29, 2006
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Cats out of the bag on this one. SCOTUS ruled college athletes can make money off their images. And you had better believe they will. How this will change college sports is anyone's guess. But I'm willing to bet that the schools who embrace athletes having this control will have a recruiting edge over schools that don't.
Just to clarify, SCOTUS ruled that colleges could not limit payments to students associated with education benefits. The ruling had no bearing on NIL. NIL is about to become law in several states on 07/01/21 including Florida which forced the NCAA and other states hand in providing some kind of program to govern NIL as many states have not yet passed a NIL law and it would have created an unlevel playing field.
The NCAA screwed the pooch on NIL, as they thought a federal law would be passed in time but of course, that didn't happen.

Wording of SCOTUS ruling
Under the decision, the NCAA can provide student athletes unlimited education-related compensation, like compensation for internships or funds for musical instruments. The justices rejected the NCAA’s claim that its amateur league status could not be maintained if athletes could receive pay.
 

sober_teacher

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Mar 26, 2007
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The fun part in all this is when athletes realize they have to pay taxes on this new income.

I think NIL is ultimately a good thing for amateur athletes, but I also don’t think they realize all the consequences of this yet.
 

NoleinATL

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Oct 29, 2006
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The fun part in all this is when athletes realize they have to pay taxes on this new income.

I think NIL is ultimately a good thing for amateur athletes, but I also don’t think they realize all the consequences of this yet.

Most of the Power 5 schools are working hard to create programs to help educate and maximize students income as they know it will help in recruiting.

Florida St was one of the first to announce new initiative tied to NIL which focuses on all aspects including finances. This program is partnered with the Business School --really good article linked below

APEX
 
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