Has the Republican Party Become the Party of the Working Man?

Nov 28, 2010
79,028
32,270
113
Maryland
Saw an interview with David Brooks from last fall and he recounted his experience at a conservative convention where a lot of Rs were saying that the GOP was becoming the party of the working man, while the Dems were now the corporate party.

How much truth to that? And if true, is it because the Rs really are on the side of the working man or more a matter that the Dems have abandoned that traditional role?
 

SSG T

HR Legend
Gold Member
Jul 10, 2002
42,207
58,160
113
I want to preface this by saying, I don't want to imply the Dems are the "Working man's party" because they aren't.

To the point, the GOP being the working man's party is laughable. If they were for taxing the s*** out of the rich, national health care, putting limits on profits by energy producers, pushing for higher minimum wage, cutting low/middle class taxes plus more things than I will list or even think of then they might be.

As it stands now, they are about as far from being the working man's party as one can be.
 

FAUlty Gator

HR Legend
Oct 27, 2017
29,084
32,565
113
Saw an interview with David Brooks from last fall and he recounted his experience at a conservative convention where a lot of Rs were saying that the GOP was becoming the party of the working man, while the Dems were now the corporate party.

How much truth to that? And if true, is it because the Rs really are on the side of the working man or more a matter that the Dems have abandoned that traditional role?
If Tim Scott and Ilhan Omar walked into a Philly union bar, who do you think would get the better reception? The one who wants them to keep more of their money or the one that wants them to make the bar’s bathroom situation more inclusive?
 

FAUlty Gator

HR Legend
Oct 27, 2017
29,084
32,565
113
Let's try Fetterman from Pennsylvania vs Mitch McConnell.
Ok. And I think that’s the point of the OP. The answer 10 years ago would have been undoubtedly Fetterman. It would be way closer now. I mean, who do you think those guys are gonna vote for in the upcoming one? It’s not the slam dunk it once would have been. That’s for sure.
 

BelemNole

HR Legend
Mar 29, 2002
31,432
65,034
113
Ok. And I think that’s the point of the OP. The answer 10 years ago would have been undoubtedly Fetterman. It would be way closer now. I mean, who do you think those guys are gonna vote for in the upcoming one? It’s not the slam dunk it once would have been. That’s for sure.
No, the point is that you can pick any two polarizing figures to make your point.

Trump grabbed a lot of "working class" with his cult of personality. The question moving forward is can the GOP retain any of those votes with their platform of "owning the libs" and tax cuts to the wealthy.
 

Colonoscopy

HR MVP
Feb 20, 2022
1,610
1,684
113
50
Saw an interview with David Brooks from last fall and he recounted his experience at a conservative convention where a lot of Rs were saying that the GOP was becoming the party of the working man, while the Dems were now the corporate party.

How much truth to that? And if true, is it because the Rs really are on the side of the working man or more a matter that the Dems have abandoned that traditional role?
Culturally, yeah. Economically, not really. (granted, dems aren't much better)

But everything is cultural now.
 

FAUlty Gator

HR Legend
Oct 27, 2017
29,084
32,565
113
No, the point is that you can pick any two polarizing figures to make your point.

Trump grabbed a lot of "working class" with his cult of personality. The question moving forward is can the GOP retain any of those votes with their platform of "owning the libs" and tax cuts to the wealthy.
As opposed to the Dem platform of ignoring inflation and the border and fearmongering about the end of democracy in states with record voter turnout. Close call.
 

BelemNole

HR Legend
Mar 29, 2002
31,432
65,034
113
As opposed to the Dem platform of ignoring inflation and the border and fearmongering about the end of democracy in states with record voter turnout. Close call.
Fearmongering? LOL that's rich. And you said it in the same post you mentioned the border. It's like you're not self-aware at all.
But then, anyone paying any attention to your posts knew that already.
BEWARE, the MEXICAN rapists are coming for you right after the TRANS athletes steal your daughter's medals and the GAYS infiltrate your school and the LIBS confiscate your guns!!!!!
 

Old_wrestling_fan

HR Legend
Mar 2, 2009
10,716
10,393
113
Iowa City
The working man says, “Gas is expensive.”

The Dem energy chief says, “Go buy an expensive electric car.”

Gee…can’t figure out why the Dems are losing them.
For some, it's just this simple. ^^

I know many "working men", a number of whom work for me and once upon a time I would estimate that 80%+ of them voted Dem. (Not really sure, because no one talked too much about politics openly back in the day. But based on bumper stickers, some open comments made, etc, I would be comfortable guessing at that 80% range, or above, for the Dems.)

Now...easily flip flopped, fairly confident that 80%+ vote for R's. Things referenced by the men that would influence this...

1. Student debt forgiveness. The Dem's keep edging this way and I can't think of a worse strategy for them to take. They are not going to gain a lot of votes by doing this that they weren't otherwise going to get, IMO. But they are losing votes over this policy alone. Net, net...I think they are guilty of self-injurious behavior here. But, whatever.

2. Inflation, even prior to the past 6 months of hyper inflation.

3. Really anything economic, to include government sponsored entitlement and spending in general, or income tax related. Basically, they are going to work, paying taxes and to the extent that others aren't, and are receiving whatever stipend, etc, from the govt...that's not cool.

4. Open borders - in some cases, jobs/positions have been "lost" to illegal aliens and that creates hard feelings.

5. Wokeness, in various forms.

In short, in the infamous words of James Carville, "It's the economy, stupid!". Still applies from what I can gather.
 

ThorneStockton

HR Legend
Oct 2, 2009
24,493
34,616
113
Depending on how you define working man, you could definitely see some of it play out in party/voting demographics. We heard all about Trump's bloc of non-college educated voters and how college educated people are now predominately Democrats. So if workingman is presumed to be non-college educated, yeah, I guess.

Culturally for sure. The anger, resentment, bitterness, always fulfilled with someone to blame: globalists, deep state, illegals, libs, etc.

Tack on the rural v urban divide.

Tack on the decline of unions.
 

FAUlty Gator

HR Legend
Oct 27, 2017
29,084
32,565
113
I bet you felt accomplished typing that out
Nah. I already am accomplished. I was just correct in typing that out.

Do you and the rest really need it spelled out to you that the reason the working class is leaving the Dems is 100% due to their “all politics are identity politics” platform? You think a Union welder sees 100,000 illegals crossing the border and says to himself, “Awwww…I hope they aren’t keeping them in cages!?!?”

I’m also sure he loves being called a bigot because he thinks men have penises.

Do you think that guy is pumping $160 of gas into his truck thinking, “Man, I’m so happy that 18 months later we are going to have hearings on the Capitol riots. Boy, my party really focuses on the things I care about!”

The answer to the OP isn’t some sort of mystery. It’s just that Dems refuse to accept the answer due to their refusal to leave their identity politics behind.

If you’re not gonna do anything to make the working class’s life better, you probably shouldn’t insult them the entire time and still expect them to vote your way. How often do you think straight, white Christians can hear that “straight white Christians” are to blame for everything bad in America, before they start to take it personally?

Why? What reason do you think they’re leaving the Dems? Let me guess…FoxNews.
 

NCHawk5

HR Heisman
Gold Member
Aug 7, 2019
7,581
5,476
113
I want to preface this by saying, I don't want to imply the Dems are the "Working man's party" because they aren't.

To the point, the GOP being the working man's party is laughable. If they were for taxing the s*** out of the rich, national health care, putting limits on profits by energy producers, pushing for higher minimum wage, cutting low/middle class taxes plus more things than I will list or even think of then they might be.

As it stands now, they are about as far from being the working man's party as one can be.
Lol higher minimum wage? That ones been debunked for all to see over the last couple of years.

They have cut low/middle taxes. Generally unemployment rates drop when Rs run the show and incomes across the board rise.

Taxing the rich doesn’t have shit to do with helping the working class.
 

86Hawkeye

HR Legend
Gold Member
Dec 12, 2001
40,862
14,323
113
For some, it's just this simple. ^^

I know many "working men", a number of whom work for me and once upon a time I would estimate that 80%+ of them voted Dem. (Not really sure, because no one talked too much about politics openly back in the day. But based on bumper stickers, some open comments made, etc, I would be comfortable guessing at that 80% range, or above, for the Dems.)

Now...easily flip flopped, fairly confident that 80%+ vote for R's. Things referenced by the men that would influence this...

1. Student debt forgiveness. The Dem's keep edging this way and I can't think of a worse strategy for them to take. They are not going to gain a lot of votes by doing this that they weren't otherwise going to get, IMO. But they are losing votes over this policy alone. Net, net...I think they are guilty of self-injurious behavior here. But, whatever.

2. Inflation, even prior to the past 6 months of hyper inflation.

3. Really anything economic, to include government sponsored entitlement and spending in general, or income tax related. Basically, they are going to work, paying taxes and to the extent that others aren't, and are receiving whatever stipend, etc, from the govt...that's not cool.

4. Open borders - in some cases, jobs/positions have been "lost" to illegal aliens and that creates hard feelings.

5. Wokeness, in various forms.

In short, in the infamous words of James Carville, "It's the economy, stupid!". Still applies from what I can gather.
I think this list is pretty indicative.
 

tumorboy

HR Legend
Gold Member
Sep 24, 2002
24,676
28,307
113
If Tim Scott and Ilhan Omar walked into a Philly union bar, who do you think would get the better reception? The one who wants them to keep more of their money or the one that wants them to make the bar’s bathroom situation more inclusive?
Well Omar is more attractive. I'm thinking she'd get more action at the bar scene. Than gummy Scott.
 

Menace Sockeyes

HR Legend
Sep 2, 2010
41,325
58,516
113
If Tim Scott and Ilhan Omar walked into a Philly union bar, who do you think would get the better reception? The one who wants them to keep more of their money or the one that wants them to make the bar’s bathroom situation more inclusive?
I went to a blue collar union hall a year and a half ago for a member's wedding reception. Considering they had Trump's face on the urinal cakes, I'd say Omar.

Blue_1024x1024@2x.jpg
 

tumorboy

HR Legend
Gold Member
Sep 24, 2002
24,676
28,307
113
Ted Cruz says it's the Bluejeans and Beer party. Well it's at least the persona when he isn't begging billionaires and millionaires for cash.
 

ThorneStockton

HR Legend
Oct 2, 2009
24,493
34,616
113
FWIW, while union leadership is still rock solid with the Dem's, there are MANY rank and file union members that fit the description that I provided.

I don't doubt it. Most of what you described are things to be angry about. Typically, that angers comes with someone to blame.

The GOP, especially with the rise of Trumpism have been really effective with their messaging in terms of generating things to be angry (victimized) about and identifying the offenders to blame. Trump was able to really tap into that anger and resentment.

You provided a short list but it could be much longer: Rigged elections. Mainstream media. Elites looking down on them. Rural decline. Opioids. Guns. Covid. I suppose wokeness covers a large variety but anything CRT, trans, BLM.
 

FAUlty Gator

HR Legend
Oct 27, 2017
29,084
32,565
113
I went to a blue collar union hall a year and a half ago for a member's wedding reception. Considering they had Trump's face on the urinal cakes, I'd say Omar.

Blue_1024x1024@2x.jpg
The question is why they’re leaving the Dems, not why they love Trump. I’d say that most people in the country dislike Trump and think the Dems are awful.
 

Menace Sockeyes

HR Legend
Sep 2, 2010
41,325
58,516
113
The question is why they’re leaving the Dems, not why they love Trump. I’d say that most people in the country dislike Trump and think the Dems are awful.
I'm just answering your hypothetical. Most union workers understand which party has their back. Omar has won both her primaries and her general elections on the strength of union endorsements. I think the assumption here is that blue collar white guy won't vote for a young Muslim woman of color, but the actual results don't bear that out...

 

NewVicHawkeye

HR All-State
Jul 19, 2021
558
806
93
Both parties fight over stupid stuff that affects very few people. Leave people alone when they’re in the bathroom and move on to fixing problems that affect more people.

Gender crap really needs to end.
 

kc78

HR MVP
Nov 25, 2002
2,280
5,653
113
44
Pensacola, FL
Both parties are useless to the working man. However, when it comes to the R's I think you could definitely say they're the party of the disgruntled, white working man. They've given them people to blame and promises of making it all better once those things are removed. It's all nonsense and meanwhile their policies will continue to make things worse for white working man, but since they see the Dems only sticking up for minorities and the republicans keep blaming those minorities for their situation it makes it easy for them to vote, especially if you wrap it up in the flag and cover it with the Bible.
 

biggreydogs

HR Legend
Oct 2, 2001
14,004
8,548
113
I'm just answering your hypothetical. Most union workers understand which party has their back. Omar has won both her primaries and her general elections on the strength of union endorsements. I think the assumption here is that blue collar white guy won't vote for a young Muslim woman of color, but the actual results don't bear that out...

She has won on one point only, the Somali.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 23 so far
May 17, 2021
1,149
2,479
113
Saw an interview with David Brooks from last fall and he recounted his experience at a conservative convention where a lot of Rs were saying that the GOP was becoming the party of the working man, while the Dems were now the corporate party.

How much truth to that? And if true, is it because the Rs really are on the side of the working man or more a matter that the Dems have abandoned that traditional role?
Never has a party in US history been so captured by corporate interests - and so viciously against working people - than the current GOP.

Corporations hate government and regulation and democracy, so the GOP, which corps have captured and citizens United made permanent, sold out to trumpism and culture war issues to delude and distract working people into thinking the GOP is on their side.

dems are mostly corporate too. Not as bad though. Not pro fascism for sure like the GOP.
 
Last edited:

THE_DEVIL

HR King
Gold Member
Aug 16, 2005
55,617
56,031
113
Hell, Michigan
www.livecoinwatch.com
Here in Ottumwa which at one time was a solid union town-

In Wapello County, IA 37.2% of the people voted Democrat in the last presidential election, 60.9% voted for the Republican Party, and the remaining 1.9% voted Independent.

In the last Presidential election, Wapello county remained overwhelmingly Republican, 60.9% to 37.2%.
Wapello county voted Republican in the two most recent Presidential elections, after voting Democratic in the previous four,

Looking at the stats I would guess the biggest reason
10.5% claim Hispanic Ethnicity which has probably doubled over the time frame listed above
 

Tfxchawk

HR MVP
Jun 22, 2021
2,163
1,970
113
Nah. I already am accomplished. I was just correct in typing that out.

Do you and the rest really need it spelled out to you that the reason the working class is leaving the Dems is 100% due to their “all politics are identity politics” platform? You think a Union welder sees 100,000 illegals crossing the border and says to himself, “Awwww…I hope they aren’t keeping them in cages!?!?”

I’m also sure he loves being called a bigot because he thinks men have penises.

Do you think that guy is pumping $160 of gas into his truck thinking, “Man, I’m so happy that 18 months later we are going to have hearings on the Capitol riots. Boy, my party really focuses on the things I care about!”

The answer to the OP isn’t some sort of mystery. It’s just that Dems refuse to accept the answer due to their refusal to leave their identity politics behind.

If you’re not gonna do anything to make the working class’s life better, you probably shouldn’t insult them the entire time and still expect them to vote your way. How often do you think straight, white Christians can hear that “straight white Christians” are to blame for everything bad in America, before they start to take it personally?

Why? What reason do you think they’re leaving the Dems? Let me guess…FoxNews.
Add in that the democrats call them stupid on a regular basis and they know it....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mike Zierath