Interesting, guess who loves the cannabis the most in America?

CarolinaHawkeye

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$3/gram for high grade weed? It used to cost $25/3.5 grams of low grade weed 25 years ago.

If they really want to sandbag the CPI, they'd include pot in the rolling basket of goods.
I take it they don't have nickel and dime bags anymore.
 

DianaPowell

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Oklahoma is a good representation of a state that has been positively influenced by legalizing marijuana. I live in Canada, and legalizing changed this country. First of all, new businesses like mine appear to be based on producing marijuana that are paying taxes. It is improving the economy of the country. Also, there appeared some work for IT developers. For example, I am using the software from parsi.co, which help to run my business. It is made especially for marijuana businesses to improve the quality of products.
 
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soybean

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Shortly after I got out of the Army I met a young lass in Iowa City that was from Oklahoma. She turned m on to several things that made my first summer home pleasurable including her older brother's friends in Mason Profit and his homegrown hybrid from grand daddy's farm near Enid.
 
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FSUTribe76

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Sounds like I need to place a chain of my extraction business in Oklahoma. Wax and Shatter sell for far more and local mom and pops can’t afford a million or more for equipment to make it. That’s why we’re flush with money in the Caribbean. Not too many of the big growers and those that are there are too busy shipping to Canada and the EU to bother with the local Caribbean or US market.
 

Bedivir

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In the U.S., the use of marijuana for non-medical purposes is legal in only four states (including the District of Columbia). Still, in fact, it is widespread throughout the country. Geographically, the greatest interest in the plant is in the West and Northeast. As for places where cannabis is not favored, they are mostly agricultural and southern states. Utah, for example, breaks out of the general trend for western states, and Wisconsin, despite its proximity to smoky Michigan, is one of the last places in the ranking. We have a local Brampton dispensary where people can safely come in and purchase a certain amount. Most people buy them for therapeutic and procedural referrals.
 
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tumorboy

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I live in Oklahoma (unfortunately) and it’s a weird place to live. Since I’ve moved here, they’ve legalized casino gambling, tattoo parlors and weed stores. The weed stores are everywhere. It’s a regular Redneck heaven.

Had dinner recently with an old friend who is now a traveling evangelist. One of the smartest guys I’ve ever met. Dude was the biggest pot smokin musician in the 90’s before turning to religion. He shocked me by telling me how terrible this is for the state. Pot was legalized for medicinal purposes only but only a small fraction are smoking for that. People just wanna get high. That’s it. He brought up some good points on the negative impacts this will have on the culture overall.
People just want to get high. Weird same thing with beer.
 
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Rifler

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Shortly after I got out of the Army I met a young lass in Iowa City that was from Oklahoma. She turned m on to several things that made my first summer home pleasurable including her older brother's friends in Mason Profit and his homegrown hybrid from grand daddy's farm near Enid.

Back in the day Mason Profit was one of my favorite bands,.. Saw the Talbot bothers live numerous times.
 
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soybean

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Back in the day Mason Profit was one of my favorite bands,.. Saw the Talbot bothers live numerous times.
Saw them the first time at Coe College and I too was hooked. Eugene Pratt spoke to me.
 

Rifler

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Saw them the first time at Coe College and I too was hooked. Eugene Pratt spoke to me.

Good tune,.. Saw them first time at Loras College in Dubuque, IA,... I recall that Terry had a great voice, while his brother John was an amazing musician,.. The bass player, I think his name was Tim, while quite good never seemed to confident enough to play facing the audience.
 

bostavan

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I started using CBD oil last year after I broke my leg at a ski resort. The fracture area hurt greatly, especially in bad weather, so I started looking for a pain reliever. A friend recommended CBD oil; at first, it worked great, but over time the effect seemed to dull. I decided to see if there was anything better. In short, it's all about the raw material, and if you use gummies, the effect is better. They contain more cannabinoids and terpenes than processed oils or flowers. I usually buy at https://www.tillmanstranquils.com/product/cbd-gummies-1500mg-melatonin/.
 
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soybean

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Good tune,.. Saw them first time at Loras College in Dubuque, IA,... I recall that Terry had a great voice, while his brother John was an amazing musician,.. The bass player, I think his name was Tim, while quite good never seemed to confident enough to play facing the audience.
I saw them and Black Oak Arkansas at least a couplethree times a month for a good year or so back then. I also saw a group called Enoch Smokey a good dozens times during that same period.
 
May 27, 2010
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Shortly after I got out of the Army I met a young lass in Iowa City that was from Oklahoma. She turned m on to several things that made my first summer home pleasurable including her older brother's friends in Mason Profit and his homegrown hybrid from grand daddy's farm near Enid.
A friend of mine from grad school at Iowa told me his farmer dad back in Kansas made more each year from his off the books cannabis harvest than all of his wheat and sunflower crops combined. I don’t doubt it either.
 
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Jan 25, 2022
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Blood red Okies. Fascinating read:

FTA: “It smells like weed all the damn time, even right here in our offices,” said Haskell County’s Sheriff Tim Turner, a Republican, pointing toward one of the dozens of licensed marijuana farms in his county, this one across the road from his department. “We’re one of the reddest states around, but we have the country’s most permissive marijuana laws.”

How Oklahoma Became a Marijuana Boom State​

Weed entrepreneurs have poured into Oklahoma from across the United States, propelled by low start-up costs and relaxed rules.

By Simon Romero
  • Dec. 29, 2021
KEOTA, Okla. — Across Oklahoma, a staunchly conservative state with a history of drawing people in search of wealth from the land, a new kind of crop is taking over old chicken coops, trailer parks and fields where cattle used to graze.

Next door to a Pentecostal church in the tiny town of Keota, the smell of marijuana drifts through the air at the G & C Dispensary. Strains with names like OG Kush and Maui Waui go for $3 a gram, about a quarter of the price in other states.

Down the road, an indoor-farming operation is situated in a residential area near mobile homes, one of about 40 in the town of just 500 residents. “It might look strange, but this is where the action is,” said Logan Pederson, 32, who moved this year from Seattle to Oklahoma to manage the small farm for a company called Cosmos Cultivation.

Ever since the state legalized medical marijuana three years ago, Oklahoma has become one of the easiest places in the United States to launch a weed business. The state now boasts more retail cannabis stores than Colorado, Oregon and Washington combined. In October, it eclipsed California as the state with the largest number of licensed cannabis farms, which now number more than 9,000, despite a population only a tenth of California’s.

The growth is all the more remarkable given that the state has not legalized recreational use of marijuana. But with fairly lax rules on who can obtain a medical card, about 10 percent of Oklahoma’s nearly four million residents have one, by far the most of any other state.

Fueled by low barriers for entry and a fairly hands-off approach by state officials, weed entrepreneurs have poured into Oklahoma from around the United States. It costs just $2,500 to get started, compared to $100,000 or more across the state line in Arkansas. And Oklahoma, a state that has long had a tough-on-crime stance, has no cap on how many dispensaries can sell marijuana, the number of cannabis farms or even how much each farm can produce.

That unfettered growth has pitted legacy ranchers and farmers against this new breed of growers. Groups representing ranchers, farmers, sheriffs and crop dusters recently joined forces to call for a moratorium on new licenses. They cited climbing prices for land, illicit farms and strains on rural water and electricity supplies as among the reasons. In some parts, new indoor farms are using hundreds of thousands of gallons of water.

A legal cannabis growing operation using old chicken houses in rural Haskell County.


But a moratorium is not likely, said Adria Berry, the director of the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority, which oversees the industry and reported nearly $138 million in revenue from retail, state and local taxes this year, through November, on the sale of cannabis.

Ms. Berry, an early opponent of medical cannabis, says the industry is here to stay and that the state’s marijuana law effectively restrains her agency from limiting the number of new licenses it approves.
On the ground level, that means that the number of Oklahoma cannabis businesses keeps on surging.




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Big multistate marijuana companies have largely chosen to sit out Oklahoma’s boom, Mr. Keating added, opting instead for states where market access is restricted and far more costly. “These mom-and-pop dispensaries are providing a service just like the local liquor store, the local carwash,” he said.

But unlike local businesses, where the customers are typically residents, critics assert that growers in Oklahoma are producing far more marijuana than can possibly be sold in the state and are feeding illicit markets around the country.

Because of lower costs for licensing, labor and land, growers can produce cannabis for as little as $100 a pound, and then turn around and sell that for between $3,500 to $4,000 a pound in California or New York, said Mark Woodward, a spokesman for the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics.

“The profit margin is astronomical if you can move your operation to Oklahoma and get away with it,” Mr. Woodward said of Oklahoma growers serving markets elsewhere in violation of state and federal laws.


merlin_199202106_127924cc-8f2f-423c-bdad-7e39a101c427-articleLarge.jpg


Cannabis prices in Oklahoma have dropped by about 50 percent in the last six months due to the increased supply.Credit...Brett Deering for The New York Times
Eying such violations, the authorities have carried out a series of raids this year, shutting down nearly 80 farms since April in an effort to reduce Oklahoma’s production of black-market marijuana. In Haskell County, a rural eastern patch of the state, authorities in June seized 10,000 marijuana plants, 100 pounds of processed cannabis, plus a bevy of firearms and parcels of cash, from an operation that had moved from Colorado to Oklahoma.

Lawmakers recently allowed revenues from cannabis licensing to create a full-time enforcement unit, and the state narcotics bureau has hired nearly 20 agents. Another measure now allows the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority to hire more than 70 new employees, mainly to work in compliance and enforcement.
While the influx intensifies, growers have groused that the ever-expanding supply has made cannabis prices plunge by about half in the last six months, to as low as $800 a pound for some strains, down from $1,600.

Tara Tischauer, co-owner of Red Dirt Sungrown in Guthrie, a town north of Oklahoma City, said falling prices have reduced her revenue by about one-third this year. Still, her operation, part of a family business that also includes a hemp farm and garden plant greenhouses, employs 25 people and steadily produces about 125 pounds of cannabis a week.
“A few years ago I thought Oklahoma would have been the last state in the country to get cannabis going,” said Ms. Tischauer, 46. “If we can’t succeed, it’s our own fault. That’s how a free market works.”

Despite a saturated market, she said she believes the state’s cannabis industry is still in its infancy. Activists have begun organizing to secure a referendum on the ballot next year that would legalize recreational use of marijuana. Doing so could bolster the state’s growers, who Ms. Tischauser said could look to meet demand from neighboring Texas, where legislators have resisted full legalization of cannabis.

For critics of Oklahoma’s approach to marijuana, that would be a move in the wrong direction.

“It smells like weed all the damn time, even right here in our offices,” said Haskell County’s Sheriff Tim Turner, a Republican, pointing toward one of the dozens of licensed marijuana farms in his county, this one across the road from his department. “We’re one of the reddest states around, but we have the country’s most permissive marijuana laws.”
Honestly, have never heard such info about Oklahoma. Maybe, it's because I'm not that interested in the marijuana theme. Some time ago, I was against legalizing marijuana at all, but after participating in one discussion group at my uni and writing small research, I changed my mind. On this source https://studymoose.com/free-essays/legalizing-marijuana, I read different essay examples on that topic, which helped me to understand everything better.
Now I have mixed feelings about it. On the one hand, I support medical cannabis and have nothing against people who smoke for fun; I mind my own business.
But on the other hand, I have no idea how it's possible to live somewhere where "It smells like weed all the damn time, even right here in our offices,". Once I was at a festival in Europe, and someone smoked in a crowd; it smelled so bad. Yes, it's his choice, but there were other people.
So, I have nothing against it until it disturbs me.
 
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torbee

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Honestly, have never heard such info about Oklahoma. Maybe, it's because I'm not that interested in the marijuana theme.
I have mixed feelings about cannabis farms, growing, smoking, etc. On one hand, I totally support medical cannabis and have nothing against people, who smoke for fun, I mind my own business.
But on the other hand, I have no idea how it's possible to live somewhere where “It smells like weed all the damn time, even right here in our offices,”. Once I was at a festival in Europe, and someone smoked in a crowd, it smelled so bad. Yes, it's his choice, but there were other people.
So, I can say, I have nothing against until it disturbes me
I think that’s totally fair. It is a very intense and not always pleasant (especially to non users) smell.
 

ConvenientParking

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Honestly, have never heard such info about Oklahoma. Maybe, it's because I'm not that interested in the marijuana theme.
I have mixed feelings about cannabis farms, growing, smoking, etc. On one hand, I totally support medical cannabis and have nothing against people, who smoke for fun, I mind my own business.
But on the other hand, I have no idea how it's possible to live somewhere where “It smells like weed all the damn time, even right here in our offices,”. Once I was at a festival in Europe, and someone smoked in a crowd, it smelled so bad. Yes, it's his choice, but there were other people.
So, I can say, I have nothing against until it disturbes me
 

Flie

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Nov 2, 2001
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btw, OP story is not surprising. The bible belt has the most churches and the most strip clubs.

I've always found this amusing. The interstates in Georgia are filled with billboards for strip clubs and rub and tug massage places.

You can also marry a high school sophomore in most of the bible belt states.
 

nu2u

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Aug 10, 2006
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Dude was the biggest pot smokin musician in the 90’s before turning to religion. He shocked me by telling me how terrible this is for the state.
Much tougher to scratch out a living selling CDs out of a crate and performing before working class drunks on the dive bar circuit than collecting salvation donations and selling miracle trinkets to reformed drunks/drug ddicts (not to mention the more wealthy and anxious seniors) on the guest speaker church circuit.
 

Nole Lou

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Apr 5, 2002
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I have a weird theory, that everyone is going to think I'm batshit because its so counterintuitive.

I think there are signs of a subtle reversal of poles along issues of what have been been sort of traditional "morality" issues and what party wants to police your private life. Traditionally of course the Republicans have wanted to control people do in their bedrooms and watch on TV in the privacy of their own homes, and Democrats have been the party of libertines (obviously, I'm using broad stereotypes).

This is totally hidden under the Roe/Dobbs issue which seems to totally oppose my point, but deep below, I think there is an undercurrent of a shift. I think its about 10 years from breaking into the open, but if you look at the very online and young left, they are becoming increasingly sex-negative, and consider almost any enjoyment in life as a shameful embracing of capitalism. They are adapting very strict rules about what you can and should enjoy.

Meanwhile, the right is continuing to shift their base to the working classes, especially whites but also minorities, and less about 55 year old married white-collar managerial types that need to try to portray their upstanding moral wasp discipline at all times.

Essentially, I think subtly we're at the start of a realignment where "naggy, schoolmarmish, controlling, moralistic killjoys" becomes more synonymous with the left, and "here for a good time, party naked" becomes more synonymous with the right.

I know it sounds crazy, but I can see signs of it breaking through here and there. It's not going to be a straight line, and there are still going to be times and places on the right where the bible holds sway. But I think it's happening, and on the way you're going to see weird contradictions like this Oklahoma/weed thing.

I know that it's trendy to predict that the right is moving toward instituting some kind of fundamentalist Christian theocracy. But I don't think that's really where we're headed, and possibly quite the opposite. I think a lot of voters on both sides are going to adapt or find themselves displaced.
 
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BelemNole

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I have a weird theory, that everyone is going to think I'm batshit because its so counterintuitive.

I think there are signs of a subtle reversal of poles along issues of what have been been sort of traditional "morality" issues and what party wants to police your private life. Traditionally of course the Republicans have wanted to control people do in their bedrooms and watch on TV in the privacy of their own homes, and Democrats have been the party of libertines (obviously, I'm using broad stereotypes).

This is totally hidden under the Roe/Dobbs issue which seems to totally oppose my point, but deep below, I think there is an undercurrent of a shift. I think its about 10 years from breaking into the open, but if you look at the very online and young left, they are becoming increasingly sex-negative, and consider almost any enjoyment in life as a shameful embracing of capitalism. They are adapting very strict rules about what you can and should enjoy.

Meanwhile, the right is continuing to shift their base to the working classes, especially whites but also minorities, and less about 55 year old married white-collar managerial types that need to try to portray their upstanding moral wasp discipline at all times.

Essentially, I think subtly we're at the start of a realignment where "naggy, schoolmarmish, controlling, moralistic killjoys" becomes more synonymous with the left, and "here for a good time, party naked" becomes more synonymous with the right.

I know it sounds crazy, but I can see signs of it breaking through here and there. It's not going to be a straight line, and there are still going to be times and places on the right where the bible holds sway. But I think it's happening, and on the way you're going to see weird contradictions like this Oklahoma/weed thing.

I know that it's trendy to predict that the right is moving toward instituting some kind of fundamentalist Christian theocracy. But I don't think that's really where we're headed, and possibly quite the opposite. I think a lot of voters on both sides are going to adapt or find themselves displaced.
I think what you're noticing is that the right is, and always has been tremendous hypocrites.
Just like with alcohol and sex before it, same with weed. Fine for me, but not for thee.
 
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Nole Lou

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I think what you're noticing is that the right is, and always has been tremendous hypocrites.
Just like with alcohol and sex before it, same with weed. Fine for me, but not for thee.

No, I considered that, and actually referenced it with "married white-collar managerial types that need to try to portray their upstanding moral wasp discipline at all times."

Hypocrisy has always been there. (And thank god that Democrats aren't hypocrites and never violate their own Covid rules or fly private jets to vacations etc).

Nope, I'm talking about something different.

Not that I'm not expecting you to be able to see or even consider anything nuanced or interesting - when all you've got is a "Democrat Good Republican Bad" hammer, everything looks like a nail. My theory (admittedly seemingly preposterous for now) isn't even a value judgement in the least that this shift is good or bad or somehow makes one side better or worse. It isn't partisan in that sense at all. Just a bold prediction.
 

BelemNole

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No, I considered that, and actually referenced it with "married white-collar managerial types that need to try to portray their upstanding moral wasp discipline at all times."

Hypocrisy has always been there. (And thank god that Democrats aren't hypocrites and never violate their own Covid rules or fly private jets to vacations etc).

Nope, I'm talking about something different.

Not that I'm not expecting you to be able to see or even consider anything nuanced or interesting - when all you've got is a "Democrat Good Republican Bad" hammer, everything looks like a nail. My theory (admittedly seemingly preposterous for now) isn't even a value judgement in the least that this shift is good or bad or somehow makes one side better or worse. It isn't partisan in that sense at all. Just a bold prediction.
I'll grant you that it's bold. But hey, if the white trash rodeo wins out over the christian nationalist over the heart of the republican party I'll be thrilled and give you full credit.
 
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Nole Lou

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I'll grant you that it's bold. But hey, if the white trash rodeo wins out over the christian nationalist over the heart of the republican party I'll be thrilled and give you full credit.

LOL...that's actually a pretty good description on that side of it.
 
Nov 5, 2020
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That’s really spurring. It turns out boomers like to smoke some weed from time to time. And I can understand them because it does help to relieve some kinds of pain, and maybe it makes them a little happier.
Here in Canada it’s also not that difficult to buy weed from shops like Toronto Dispensary near me. and not only weed because you can also find CBD oil, gummies, cookies, and even chocolate – anything you like.
I personally try to be as careful as possible about it. I do smoke weed, but only on rare occasions, and I never buy it myself.
 
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ConvenientParking

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That’s really spurring. It turns out boomers like to smoke some weed from time to time. And I can understand them because it does help to relieve some kinds of pain, and maybe it makes them a little happier.
Okay bot you're getting a little closer to speaking my language. Not sure I like it.
 

millah_22

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Jun 15, 2004
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He’s right about the smell. Grow facilities need to get better at managing odor.
For sure, but that's just the nature of the crop. Had a co-worker that a hydroponics set up in his shed, and the second you walked around his house the smell hit you in the face. He only had 4 plants.