Iowa TV Rev this Year: $42M (Down $12M). Deficit now $55-65M. Had planned on $75M Loan. July 16 Story: #14 in Total Rev (5th in B1G)

OutbackBowl2017

HR Heisman
Dec 4, 2016
8,279
11,973
113
Why is Nebraska always out front releasing info like this when it should be the Commish of the B1G? Jim Delaney was always the one holding news conferences or releasing info to the media not a member school that seems to think they are the center of the universe and have to be the first with breaking news.
 

H4wkfan4life

HR Legend
Jan 1, 2016
17,685
13,103
113
So are they making more per b1g game or is it just because the miami oh garbage games generate little money?
 

DodgerHawki

HR Heisman
Nov 19, 2002
9,225
10,624
113
I've never understood how Iowa and so many other major athletics programs spend everything that they make.

I could be wrong here, but part of it is requirement and part of it is perception. Athletic departments are technically non-profits. So they can't be hoarding cash. They would receive even more criticism than they do if they were to just slash costs and stockpile cash during the good years. The criticism for not paying coaches more (especially those in non-revenue sports) would be huge. Also, can you imagine if they decided to skimp no football assistant coaches and the assistants fled in droves for other jobs because they got paid more? The backlash from the fan base would be immense. In addition to this, they have to show that they are equally supporting women's sports in addition to the men's sports (this is a good thing). This means they must pay for coaches, facilities, training and equipment, travel to allow those teams to get good competition, etc.

Then there is overall pressure from all the coaches that want to win and have the resources to do so to compete against other teams in the conference and nationally. The practice facility for football isn't/wasn't cheap. As is the Kinnick renovation. As is/was the basketball practice facility. Baseball has been trying to get upgrades to Banks Stadium. Softball needed renovations. Football spends something in the hundreds of thousands of dollars or maybe a million (I don't know) on food and nutrition for the players. Is is "necessary?" I don't know. Does it hurt the program if your competitors are doing it and you're not? Probably.

People are a bit wrong when they say college sports is a business. They are, kind of, in the sense that revenue is generated and there are expenses But if it were run like a business, the only sports that would be offered would be football, men's basketball and how many women's sports would be required from a Title IX standpoint. The Title IX rules are akin to regulations that businesses have to deal with in the real world. But if it were a business, they wouldn't offer 11 women's sports or whatever the number is at Iowa, and they wouldn't have any other men's sports other than football and basketball. The rest are just costs. This includes wrestling, baseball, track, cross country, all of it. Iowa is trying to offer opportunity for as broad a group of students as they can. They offer more sports, for example, than Alabama, which brings in huge amount of dollars for football. But Alabama has non-coaching football staff that dwarfs Iowa's.

Sorry for the long answer, but it's a weird dynamic. College athletic departments aren't permitted to directly pay players, so in lieu of that they provide a bunch of expensive stuff like training facilities, travel, etc. And then when a pandemic hits and takes the revenue way down, they are all in a pickle like they are today.
 

nick21ia

HR MVP
Jan 28, 2003
1,276
314
83
I could be wrong here, but part of it is requirement and part of it is perception. Athletic departments are technically non-profits. So they can't be hoarding cash. They would receive even more criticism than they do if they were to just slash costs and stockpile cash during the good years. The criticism for not paying coaches more (especially those in non-revenue sports) would be huge. Also, can you imagine if they decided to skimp no football assistant coaches and the assistants fled in droves for other jobs because they got paid more? The backlash from the fan base would be immense. In addition to this, they have to show that they are equally supporting women's sports in addition to the men's sports (this is a good thing). This means they must pay for coaches, facilities, training and equipment, travel to allow those teams to get good competition, etc.

Then there is overall pressure from all the coaches that want to win and have the resources to do so to compete against other teams in the conference and nationally. The practice facility for football isn't/wasn't cheap. As is the Kinnick renovation. As is/was the basketball practice facility. Baseball has been trying to get upgrades to Banks Stadium. Softball needed renovations. Football spends something in the hundreds of thousands of dollars or maybe a million (I don't know) on food and nutrition for the players. Is is "necessary?" I don't know. Does it hurt the program if your competitors are doing it and you're not? Probably.

People are a bit wrong when they say college sports is a business. They are, kind of, in the sense that revenue is generated and there are expenses But if it were run like a business, the only sports that would be offered would be football, men's basketball and how many women's sports would be required from a Title IX standpoint. The Title IX rules are akin to regulations that businesses have to deal with in the real world. But if it were a business, they wouldn't offer 11 women's sports or whatever the number is at Iowa, and they wouldn't have any other men's sports other than football and basketball. The rest are just costs. This includes wrestling, baseball, track, cross country, all of it. Iowa is trying to offer opportunity for as broad a group of students as they can. They offer more sports, for example, than Alabama, which brings in huge amount of dollars for football. But Alabama has non-coaching football staff that dwarfs Iowa's.

Sorry for the long answer, but it's a weird dynamic. College athletic departments aren't permitted to directly pay players, so in lieu of that they provide a bunch of expensive stuff like training facilities, travel, etc. And then when a pandemic hits and takes the revenue way down, they are all in a pickle like they are today.

Well said, I agree with this 100%.
 

UNIowaHawk

HR Legend
Jul 22, 2011
17,944
13,490
113
I could be wrong here, but part of it is requirement and part of it is perception. Athletic departments are technically non-profits. So they can't be hoarding cash. They would receive even more criticism than they do if they were to just slash costs and stockpile cash during the good years. The criticism for not paying coaches more (especially those in non-revenue sports) would be huge. Also, can you imagine if they decided to skimp no football assistant coaches and the assistants fled in droves for other jobs because they got paid more? The backlash from the fan base would be immense. In addition to this, they have to show that they are equally supporting women's sports in addition to the men's sports (this is a good thing). This means they must pay for coaches, facilities, training and equipment, travel to allow those teams to get good competition, etc.

Then there is overall pressure from all the coaches that want to win and have the resources to do so to compete against other teams in the conference and nationally. The practice facility for football isn't/wasn't cheap. As is the Kinnick renovation. As is/was the basketball practice facility. Baseball has been trying to get upgrades to Banks Stadium. Softball needed renovations. Football spends something in the hundreds of thousands of dollars or maybe a million (I don't know) on food and nutrition for the players. Is is "necessary?" I don't know. Does it hurt the program if your competitors are doing it and you're not? Probably.

People are a bit wrong when they say college sports is a business. They are, kind of, in the sense that revenue is generated and there are expenses But if it were run like a business, the only sports that would be offered would be football, men's basketball and how many women's sports would be required from a Title IX standpoint. The Title IX rules are akin to regulations that businesses have to deal with in the real world. But if it were a business, they wouldn't offer 11 women's sports or whatever the number is at Iowa, and they wouldn't have any other men's sports other than football and basketball. The rest are just costs. This includes wrestling, baseball, track, cross country, all of it. Iowa is trying to offer opportunity for as broad a group of students as they can. They offer more sports, for example, than Alabama, which brings in huge amount of dollars for football. But Alabama has non-coaching football staff that dwarfs Iowa's.

Sorry for the long answer, but it's a weird dynamic. College athletic departments aren't permitted to directly pay players, so in lieu of that they provide a bunch of expensive stuff like training facilities, travel, etc. And then when a pandemic hits and takes the revenue way down, they are all in a pickle like they are today.
Excellent post. I would also add that revenue from the Iowa athletic department also gets “moved” to the school’s “general fund”. I believe it’s upwards of $25M.
 
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Kinnick.At.Night

HR Heisman
Jun 27, 2018
8,760
17,279
113
So, pretty much all of the deficit for this year is due to fans not being in the stands at football games, correct?
 

Franisdaman

HR King
Nov 3, 2012
54,294
60,004
113
Heaven, Iowa
So, pretty much all of the deficit for this year is due to fans not being in the stands at football games, correct?

Good question.

The deficit will be between $55 & $65M. $39M of it is 2 line items:

$12M--less TV revenue
$27M--guestimate on lost ticket sales

The rest ($16M-$26M)? Probably in contributions & licensing (people bought less gear?).

I copied this from the original post:

TOTAL 2018-2019 REVENUE & EXPENSES of 227 TEAMS ARE HERE: https://sports.usatoday.com/ncaa/finances/

Click on the team to get a breakdown of the REVENUE Total & EXPENSE Total.

For IOWA (as you can see):
$27,179,000--Ticket Sales
$38,627,000--Contributions
$71,006,000--Rights/Licencing
$14,514,000--Other
$.....650,000--Student Fees
.......................................................
$151,976,000 TOTAL REVENUE
 
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Franisdaman

HR King
Nov 3, 2012
54,294
60,004
113
Heaven, Iowa
These SEC schools are so desperate to win ... Paying crazy salaries for HC and assistants ... Always looking to make the next great hire ... pouring money left and right (even during the pandemic) ... I'll never feel sorry for college football and any "lost" revenue ... I love me some college football ... but the extreme some programs go to never ceases to amaze me ...

It would be quite interesting to be on the inside to see the finances.

Thought you might be interested in this. Note that you can click on any team or sort by conference, etc


TOTAL 2018-2019 REVENUE & EXPENSES of 227 TEAMS ARE HERE: https://sports.usatoday.com/ncaa/finances/

Click on the team to get a breakdown of the REVENUE Total & EXPENSE Total.


$143,765,903 : Tennessee's Total Revenue
$143,765,903: Tennessee's Total Expenses

For IOWA (as you can see):
$27,179,000--Ticket Sales
$38,627,000--Contributions
$71,006,000--Rights/Licencing
$14,514,000--Other
$.....650,000--Student Fees
.......................................................
$151,976,000 TOTAL REVENUE


Total Revenue Rankings:


#1 Texas, $223,880,000
#2 Texas A&M, $212,748,000

The B1G Teams:
#3 Ohio State, $210,548,000

#4 Michigan, $197,820,000
#6 Penn State, $164,529,000
#11 Wisconsin, $157,660,000
#14 Iowa, $151,976,000
#18 Michigan State, $140,011,000
#21 Nebraska, $136,233,000
#24 Minnesota, $130,456,000
#25 Indiana, $127,833,000
#29 Illinois, $118,565,000
#31 Purdue, $110,845,000
#33 Maryland, $108,796,000
#39 Rutgers, $103,251,000 (@MrsScrew )

OTHERS:
#44 Iowa State, $95,412,000
 
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onlyTheObvious

HR Heisman
Jan 3, 2021
5,125
5,936
113
Get ready for the fear porn people to say we can’t have full stadiums this fall. Even though everybody will have had the opportunity to get vaccine long before fall.
 

Franisdaman

HR King
Nov 3, 2012
54,294
60,004
113
Heaven, Iowa
A cheesy piece of paper with some scribbles it?

lol. Even better “ a picture on your phone of a vaccine card”.


Proof of vaccination might be required for international travel, admittance to concerts, stadiums, arenas, etc.

There was a discussion recently on NBC News that you could get a QR code (unique to each individual) downloaded to your phone. The QR code would be your proof of vaccination. See the end of this post for a reminder of what a QR code looks like.

So, if proof were needed, at the gate, a scan of one QR code on your smart phone seems likely.

A person, again, would get that QR code once they are vaccinated. That QR code is for that person only. Then an app developer could figure out how to combine that QR code with the bar code for the game day ticket. That way, at the gate, when your QR code is scanned, it shows that NOT ONLY is your ticket valid BUT you are ALSO vaccinated.

I think it would all be like pre-pandemic, when you went to a pro sporting event, where tickets were all digital (on your phone) and scanned at the point of entry

Once the QR code on the phone is scanned, if it is scanned a 2nd time by another person, that person is barred from entry, just like what happens right now at pro sporting events; that could also trigger a warning to the QR code owner that a 2nd individual attempted to enter Kinnick on the same QR code

Lots of issues have to be figured out, of course, based on the B1G's covid 19 protocols

tenor.gif
 

ichawk24

HR Heisman
Nov 21, 2005
8,909
8,632
113
Iowa is also going to all electronic tickets this year.

The entry gates could be a cluster****.
 

Franisdaman

HR King
Nov 3, 2012
54,294
60,004
113
Heaven, Iowa
Did Iowa really need to cut sports?

Remember that $75M loan they thought they were going to have to take out?

And then the projected deficit decreased to $55 to $65M.

Now its $10M less than that.

 
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FreddyUI

HR All-State
Gold Member
Sep 16, 2016
515
634
93
Omaha
I've never understood how Iowa and so many other major athletics programs spend everything that they make.
Prior to the shutdown, some of the contributions should have been funneled to an Athletic department endowment. The money would not have shown up on the books as revenue and Iowa could have received the earnings for years.
 

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