Kevin Warren meets with Players regarding Revenue Sharing & improved Medical Care

bumpstock

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I did a quick google search on Title IX. Any lawyers out there please chime in.

What I found: Title IX does not require equal expenditure of funds on male and female athletes. The only dollar for dollar expenditure requirement is in the athletic financial assistance area, where schools are required to spend dollars proportional to participation rates.

So, it appears that football players & men's basketball players could be paid above and beyond "financial assistance" via revenue sharing, medical insurance coverage after the player leaves the program, and other benefits they obtain in negotiations.
"No figures were available on what percentage of that Big Ten pot the CFBPA would demand. One source speculated that the Big Ten could avoid Title IX laws by distributing the money through the conference office instead of the schools. In that sense the conference office wouldn't be an educational entity receiving federal funds necessarily subject to Title IX."

 
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walleye hunter16

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"...fired at any time." ~ I would think that the players' union would insist you show "just cause" when the case goes to court, otherwise, you'd owe the player some $$$.
Lol, dies the NFL or NBA need to show just cause for getting rid of a player. "Contracts " will be one yr and if you don't produce see ya later.
Pretty simple. You want to profit like the big boys then you play by big boy rules.
Net results will be tons of college kids paying their own way and even more separation for those with the $ to buy players.
You know just like pro sports.
 

bumpstock

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Lol, dies the NFL or NBA need to show just cause for getting rid of a player. "Contracts " will be one yr and if you don't produce see ya later.
Pretty simple. You want to profit like the big boys then you play by big boy rules.
Net results will be tons of college kids paying their own way and even more separation for those with the $ to buy players.
You know just like pro sports.
LOL, when the NFL/NBA breaks the contract, they still pay the terms of the contract unless there's an "out." Many players have 1, 2, 3, or 4 year contracts, and you know that.
"...tons of kids..." ~ Stop.
I do know, just like the pro sports
 
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Hwk-I-St8

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Players may find they're getting a piece of a smaller pie than they expected. Many college football fans are fans because it's not the NFL. I'm one and I'm not alone. They may be killing their golden goose.

I'm on the verge of bowing out and spending my time and money elsewhere. There's opportunity cost to having season tickets...I could take a European vacation for what I spend annually. The travel is starting to look more and more like a better option.
 

bumpstock

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Players may find they're getting a piece of a smaller pie than they expected. Many college football fans are fans because it's not the NFL. I'm one and I'm not alone. They may be killing their golden goose.

I'm on the verge of bowing out and spending my time and money elsewhere. There's opportunity cost to having season tickets...I could take a European vacation for what I spend annually. The travel is starting to look more and more like a better option.
They're big on football over there!

You'll love it in Europe...check out Javentus if you're in Turin, and Real is a must if you're in Madrid.
 
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Franisdaman

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This is the ultimate game changer. Truly separates the haves and the have nots (B10/SEC vs everyone else). Really a matter of when not if.

Agreed. People were wondering how teams like Iowa will spend all the extra TV money. Well, the football players (and men's basketball players) have some ideas ;)

Talk about a benefits package: free medical care (for how long after they graduate?), revenue sharing, free tuition, free unlimited food, free housing, free personal training, free top notch coaching (NFL opportunities galore), up to $6,000 for good grades, NIL opportunities.... did I miss anything?

And you are right; this is going to be a huge recruiting advantage. Will Iowa beat out the top teams in the B1G and SEC for recruits? Nope. But Iowa will have a much better chance at top recruits when competing against lower tier B1G & SEC schools & schools not in the B1G and SEC.
 
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Franisdaman

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More evidence that revenue sharing is coming.




FaiFj1oXoAM06Nv



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kwik44

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Just back off the scholarship money, let them use it on shoes & pizza. It will all even out that way & save some of the amateurism.
 

nick614

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The conference can say what it thinks but these are state schools who are entities of the state and the conference needs state permission to do any of this.
 

Franisdaman

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Story from yesterday:

College athletes advocating for revenue sharing, new model​


  • i

    Dan Murphy
  • ESPN Staff Writer
  • Nov 16, 2022

A pair of veteran college basketball players plan to use Wednesday night's game between Pittsburgh and No. 20 Michigan to start publicly campaigning for the NCAA and its schools to share revenue with athletes.

Michigan's Hunter Dickinson and Pitt's Jamarius Burton are among a group of athletes who will be writing the letter S on their hands during games this season to draw attention to their attempt to advocate for a new business model in college sports. The S, according to the players, stands for share.

They are hoping to amplify calls for the NCAA to change its rules in a way that allows the association and its school to distribute more of its resources to athletes.

Their efforts are the latest addition to widespread efforts among athletes, advocates and politicians to expand the benefits college athletes receive -- a list that includes expanded education-related benefits and the relatively new ability to make money by selling the rights to their name, image or likeness.

"NIL opened the floodgates for stuff like this," Dickinson said. "It's easier to see now how the idea of amateurism in sports is misleading. ... Seeing the money athletes are getting goes to show how much is in college sports and how much some are hoarding it."

Dickinson said he and Burton are part of a group of players who connected via conference calls in the past several weeks to discuss the campaign. He said he plans to draw an S on his hand for Wednesday night's game and then determine other steps that he and others might take during what might be his final season in the NCAA.

Their campaign is being organized in part by the National College Players Association, an advocacy group that has tried to change college sports through legislation, legal action and public pressure during the past several tumultuous years for the NCAA.

Along with asking for a share of profits, the players said in a news release they want to find ways to protect the existence of non-revenue sports, enforce Title IX rules, improve safety and medical care, ensure that Congress does not create any federal laws that would walk back the newly established NIL rules, and open the door for scholarship money in the Ivy League.

The Ivy League does not offer athletic scholarships. The group of prestigious universities previously had a Congressional antitrust exemption to allow that to happen, but that expired earlier this year. Now, some players say the policy is violating the law and limiting their options. Dickinson said that issue is important to him because of friends he has playing in the Ivy League.

Brown basketball player Grace Kirk said in a news release that limiting the ways in which athletes can receive financial aid prevents some high-level athletes from exploring the possibility of getting an Ivy League education.

"We work just as hard as any other D-I team," Kirk said. "Doing it without scholarship opportunities adds another element of difficulty to our intense combination of training and studying. Unfortunately, some high-level athletes cannot make the financial sacrifice to play for Ivy League schools without scholarship money."

NCPA leader Ramogi Huma, a former UCLA football player, said that the group plans to engage lawmakers and other enforcement agencies to try to reach these goals. Huma filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board last year in an effort to give college athletes the ability to unionize. That case is pending. He and the NCPA also recently filed a complaint asking the Department of Justice.

Huma said they are proposing that a portion of the revenue from football and basketball programs should be split equally among all players on the team. The NCPA previously helped college basketball players organize a social media protest during the 2021 March Madness tournament among other efforts. Some of Dickinson's former teammates were leaders in that push.

"It was kind of my duty to agree this time because of the guys who stepped up earlier," he said.

Dickinson said he does not expect the changes for which he's advocating to be put in place during his time as a college athlete, but he said he wants future athletes to get a fair share of the value they help create. He said he has no plans to protest in ways other than showing public support for the campaign.

 

IAHUNTER

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No "Maybe..."

All the questions you pose are answered in the respective Contracts between:
(a) the NFL Team & the NFL Player; and
(b) the NFL Teams & the NFL Players' Association.

Let's assume, shall we, that

(a) the new College Football Player's contract; and
(b) the new College Football Players' Association contract will contain the same language.
Would the players be considered state employees? If so, wouldn't that guarantee them some other benefits?
 
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blubberhawk

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I think you already know the answer to that question. As of now the ladies are free to negotiate NIL for themselves, (see C Clark). Now it they wanted to pay say just the mens football and basketball teams a %, then you'll certainly see lawsuits for titleIX formed.
It would be interesting to see with Clark and her sidekick MC returning and the continued influx in talent if they can draw consistently like the men. Down the stretch they were packing Carver, but I know thats not an every week thing. Still I'd bet our women draw better then most D1 womens teams.
I know there are some wrestling fans on here. The support for the grapplers is always solid as well. How to they compare on an average night draw to say mens Bball? Obviously they have fewer matches so that hurts overall revenue.
Iowa leads the nation in wrestling attendance. Sold out again this year. Far more enthusiastic crowd than you get at a mens bb game
 
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bumpstock

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Would the players be considered state employees? If so, wouldn't that guarantee them some other benefits?
Don't think so...I think the players would sign with their Conference which isn't a state entity. That seems to be the image Kevin Warren has hinted at.

They'd be "committed to Iowa, Michigan, whatever," but get their $$$ from the B1G.

Think of working for Gatorade, Tropicana, or Quaker Oats, but getting your check (and benefits) from PepsiCo HQ.
 
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tony0051

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I could see a modest share for FB players after the next media mega deal.

Example - just based the media rights %:

Say the next deal starts at $85M payout per school and escalates by ~$3M per year over 10-15 yrs.

Let's not forget that the B1G currently includes the league office as a "equal share", so it would have the same $85M/yr and ensuing escalation as the schools.

The players share would come from the league office cut and would probably be somewhere in the 25-30% range.

85M x .25 = 21.25M ➗ 16 (schools) = 1,328,125 ➗ 85 scholarship players = $15,625 per player, per yr.

(escalating each year after that as the school payouts increase)

Of course that's the "pre-tax" amount, the player would actually see only ~65% of that.
When looking at the finances of this you have to look at total compensation. Add the 15k with 50k for scholly and other benefits. 65k a year in compensation to play college football and be worshipped on campus seems fair.
 

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