Mike Leach concept of NIL

dbrocket

HR MVP
Jan 5, 2010
2,234
1,534
113
Leach,head coach at Miss.St, voiced his approach to NIL ECT yesterday at SEC media days.
His plan:
Players declare before entering college that they want to be either:
1. College student-athlete with the guaranteed scholly, stipends, and normal perks they get today. They cannot transfer without sitting a year.
Or
2. Declare as a pro athlete and get NIL money and ability to be a free agent like now.
But they can be cut and they have restricted movement at year end. No guaranteed scholly or stipend.
His point is that right now the pendulum has swung too far allowing these players all the perks of pros without any of the negatives.
As he said it is 365 day free agency right now which the NFL would never allow.
It is a bit radical but he thinks many players would still opt for the security of the old system with education as the main carrot.
Leach is off the wall but he is not dumb.
This is just more crybaby sh*t by a coach who got off on having total control of 100+ young men. This is a billion dollar industry. If they won't cut the workers who make that money for them in directly, it's only fair they get to cash in indirectly.
 

littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,428
6,174
113
and Kirby Smart just a $112 million dollar extension. Do you go to watch Kirby or Kirk coach or do you go to watch the players play? I get it, a full ride scholarship is worth a helluva lot of money. About 120K at Iowa for 4 years? More obviously if you're from out of state. However, if money is so tight where does GA get 112 million for a head coach? 112 million. Think about that. Why do we think it's ok for the old men to get all the money but the product on the field should just be happy w/what they get?
 
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squeezebox

HR MVP
Mar 6, 2018
2,366
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and Kirby Smart just a $112 million dollar extension. Do you go to watch Kirby or Kirk coach or do you go to watch the players play? I get it, a full ride scholarship is worth a helluva lot of money. About 120K at Iowa for 4 years? More obviously if you're from out of state. However, if money is so tight where does GA get 112 million for a head coach? 112 million. Think about that. Why do we think it's ok for the old men to get all the money but the product on the field should just be happy w/what they get?
fully agree with ya, but you pretty much just explained the American business model.
 

pistachio1999

HR MVP
Nov 29, 2021
2,175
2,648
113
and Kirby Smart just a $112 million dollar extension. Do you go to watch Kirby or Kirk coach or do you go to watch the players play? I get it, a full ride scholarship is worth a helluva lot of money. About 120K at Iowa for 4 years? More obviously if you're from out of state. However, if money is so tight where does GA get 112 million for a head coach? 112 million. Think about that. Why do we think it's ok for the old men to get all the money but the product on the field should just be happy w/what they get?
Why do NFL owners make so much?

Why won't Iowa give me a football scholarship?? I can catch a ball and tackle and run!!!!!!!!
 

littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,428
6,174
113
Why do NFL owners make so much?

Why won't Iowa give me a football scholarship?? I can catch a ball and tackle and run!!!!!!!!
Well I’m not even sure what you’re saying but NFL owners actually own the team. But nobody gives 2 shits about Lamar Hunt Jr and being part of the lucky sperm club. Kirby Smart doesn’t own the team. He just coaches it.
 

Bulldogs1974

HR Legend
Oct 16, 2012
10,056
9,558
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Why do 99.5% of college athlete have more value than a plumber nurse practitioner or office manager? Bump a d3 kid up to d2 and d2 to fcs etc you would not see a difference to the fan base. The players have nowhere near the value people think they do.
the money thrown at these college athletes whose body has far less value than the jersey is beyond me.
 

littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,428
6,174
113
Why do 99.5% of college athlete have more value than a plumber nurse practitioner or office manager? Bump a d3 kid up to d2 and d2 to fcs etc you would not see a difference to the fan base. The players have nowhere near the value people think they do.
the money thrown at these college athletes whose body has far less value than the jersey is beyond me.
Of course they do. Would you really be happy with watching the Hawks if they looked like Coe? Some of you say that but you wouldn’t. It’s why Kinnick keeps expanding, TV contracts keep growing. If the product is shit who’s going to watch? And why should Kirby Smart get 112 million dollar extension? He’s a solid coach, but he has incredible players. Why should the coach get all the money and not the players? What’s enough for a coach?
 

Bulldogs1974

HR Legend
Oct 16, 2012
10,056
9,558
113
Of course they do. Would you really be happy with watching the Hawks if they looked like Coe? Some of you say that but you wouldn’t. It’s why Kinnick keeps expanding, TV contracts keep growing. If the product is shit who’s going to watch? And why should Kirby Smart get 112 million dollar extension? He’s a solid coach, but he has incredible players. Why should the coach get all the money and not the players? What’s enough for a coach?
Having been a coach for almost 25 years and having played college football I can assure you the line between is not big.
if a g league started for football and the top 10% of players left to join it, you would not notice much of a difference and you would still love Iowa all the same.
 

littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,428
6,174
113
Having been a coach for almost 25 years and having played college football I can assure you the line between is not big.
if a g league started for football and the top 10% of players left to join it, you would not notice much of a difference and you would still love Iowa all the same.
So are you ok with Kirby Smarts 112 million dollar extension? Answer me that.
 

Hawk_4shur

HR Legend
Jan 2, 2009
15,358
20,410
113
Here's a story we can tell our grandchildren.

CF was created for young men that wanted to play football. Colleges brought those players to campus with a promise to provide them with an education and room & board. There was balance in the universe. These young men received a free education and got to display their talents for pro scouts. It was a fair deal.

Fans flocked to the stadiums in droves to cheer on the student-athletes that represented their favored school. Coaches and boosters decided that they would do anything to win, and routinely started getting fired if they didn't. Fans wouldn't give the needed donations to the schools without enough W's. Fans that didn't or couldn't go to the games clamored for TV games.

TV obliged. Night games, late afternoon games, an explosion in bowl games. Then Thursday & Friday games. Three or four games on Saturday on the same network.

Coaches started making millions. Athletic facilities became an arms race, turning the weight room into 4 star hotels. Multi-million dollar stadium renovations, luxury boxes, Bowl reps making $500k per year.

The money was flowing like water from the sky - all was great, except ....

The players still had the same deal they had in 1960. Go to school for free, play football and tryout for the pros.

NOW, the players are starting to enjoy some of the unlimited money flow. But it is unbalanced and unregulated. Players are basically free agents - they can go to the highest bidder. The "have not" fans feel helpless. The schools that hang on to the "old rules" are going to become dinosaurs. The has game changed, but not at the same pace everywhere. The playing field is no longer level. Schools, coaches, players - all now chasing the money.

So, here's the result - college football and basketball are on the precipice of a calamity. It has become stock cars racing against station wagons. Or, thoroughbreds competing against donkeys. If there is no competition, there is no joy in being a fan.

College football and basketball have jumped into an ocean of money without a life preserver. If they don't figure this out, the ocean of money could start to run dry.
 
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littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,428
6,174
113
Here's a story we can tell our grandchildren.

CF was created for young men that wanted to play football. Colleges brought those players to campus with a promise to provide them with an education and room & board. There was balance in the universe. These young men received a free education and got to display their talents for pro scouts. It was a fair deal.

Fans flocked to the stadiums in droves to cheer on the student-athletes that represented their favored school. Coaches and boosters decided that they would do anything to win, and routinely started getting fired if they didn't. Fans wouldn't give the needed donations to the schools without enough W's. Fans that didn't or couldn't go to the games clamored for TV games.

TV obliged. Night games, late afternoon games, an explosion in bowl games. Then Thursday & Friday games. Three or four games on Saturday on the same network.

Coaches started making millions. Athletic facilities became an arms race, turning the weight room into 4 star hotels. Multi-million dollar stadium renovations, luxury boxes, Bowl reps making $500k per year.

The money was flowing like water from the sky - all was great, except ....

The players still had the same deal they had in 1960. Go to school for free, play football and tryout for the pros.

NOW, the players are starting to enjoy some of the unlimited money flow. But it is unbalanced and unregulated. Players are basically free agents - they can go to the highest bidder. The "have not" fans feel helpless. The schools that hang on to the "old rules" are going to become dinosaurs. The has game changed, but not at the same pace everywhere. The playing field is no longer level. Schools, coaches, players - all now chasing the money.

So, here's the result - college football and basketball are on the precipice of a calamity. It has become stock cars racing against station wagons. Or, thoroughbreds competing against donkeys. If there is no competition, there is no joy in being a fan.

College football and basketball have jumped into an ocean of money without a life preserver. If they don't figure this out, the ocean of money could start to run dry.
Exactly what’s happened. And they’ve done it to themselves. I feel sorry for no one.
 
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BonzoFury

HR All-State
Feb 4, 2022
578
1,153
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Leach can be a bit wacky sometimes, he's dead-on balls accurate others. This is one where is right. In short, players want the benefits of being both an amateur and a professional at the same time. He's suggesting they declare one or the other.
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

HR Heisman
Gold Member
May 9, 2018
6,077
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Just reverse the buyout concept. Guessing many good young coaches will find greater job satisfaction if they have to buy their way out of contracts to move before their contract is up.

They cannot tank the seasons or risk exposure as either overrated or a shit person, and neither are preferred coaching characteristics at most schools.

Coaches and players need to understand the importance of the contracts they sign. Their signature is their word.
 

littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,428
6,174
113
Just reverse the buyout concept. Guessing many good young coaches will find greater job satisfaction if they have to buy their way out of contracts to move before their contract is up.

They cannot tank the seasons or risk exposure as either overrated or a shit person, and neither are preferred coaching characteristics at most schools.

Coaches and players need to understand the importance of the contracts they sign. Their signature is their word.
Are players actually signing contracts? Not sure what you really mean here. Say Big Bobs Burger World wants to pay the left tackle at Iowa 25K. What’s he signing? If they decide they don’t want to pay him after a year so what? Not sure it’s life or death for a college player.
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

HR Heisman
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May 9, 2018
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Why do NFL owners make so much?
Because they, or their parents or grandparents took a huge risk on something that was almost unknown, the NFL. Professional football? In America? It was crazy. Then, they guys that founded the AFL. Competing with the NFL???? People thought they were crazy. History shows brilliant not crazy. The NFL is an industry where ownership does take 100% of the risk of failure, especially the family owned teams. Of course, it's an industry where financial failure isn't much of a threat.

z said it right, the lucky sperm club. Genius comes in many forms but it always leaves its progeny well set because protecting and securing your family is hard wired human behavior. You think LeBron's kids and grandkids, and probably great grand kids will ever have to actually hold a real job?
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

HR Heisman
Gold Member
May 9, 2018
6,077
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Are players actually signing contracts? Not sure what you really mean here. Say Big Bobs Burger World wants to pay the left tackle at Iowa 25K. What’s he signing? If they decide they don’t want to pay him after a year so what? Not sure it’s life or death for a college player.
Given the amounts of money involved and the labyrinth of rules I'm guessing there are detailed contracts.

Perhaps those contracts are annual or maybe for a longer term. It's like the early days of law itself. Just seeing the beginning of the basics.

I don't know what it's like now, but ATM failure was pretty traumatic on 25 cent draw night at Maxwells.
 
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43DC

All-Conference
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Aug 7, 2018
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Having been a coach for almost 25 years and having played college football I can assure you the line between is not big.
if a g league started for football and the top 10% of players left to join it, you would not notice much of a difference and you would still love Iowa all the same.

Agreed. Most of us can’t tell the difference between a good college player and the future NFL player. Frankly, the NFL professionals miss this quite often. It is a very near gap.

If you love the game of football D3 are often better players (NOT BETTER ATHLETES) …. Better route running, better skills, better understanding of the game…. It is really good football.

Right, wrong or indifferent, what make Big Time College Football a great market are the fans, the stadium’s and the association with a college…. Not so much the players. It just needs to be competitive.
 

scotthawk1964

HR All-American
Sep 12, 2014
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DeLand, Fl
Me personally would rather see them have two choices,

A: They get a traditional full ride scholarship from a school, where all current NCAA rules apply with only one transfer allowed, which they don't have to sit out a year.

B: They can take NIL with no limits, however they receive no scholarship or any assistance from the schools except for medical. They have the option to declare for the NFL draft at anytime, they can transfer once a year if they desire, and once they choose the NIL route, it cannot be reversed. So, they better be damn sure they are getting their big dollars before they take the deal.

Just my opinion. To be honest, if I had my way I would shit can the NIL, shit can the transfer portal and go back to the original rules of college football. I am quite sure many college kids are happy I never get my way. LOL
 
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The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

HR Heisman
Gold Member
May 9, 2018
6,077
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I have been saying this for months. 2 options-traditional, which means you can only play amateur sports against amateur schools. The player gets the security of the traditional package, and I think a stipend to the compensate for the inability to maintain gainful employment and play a major sport to be sure, and I don't know the offseason programs for golf, tennis, swimming, etc... They contractually waive NIL and all other compensation not in what we'll call the "schollie package."

The blue blood schools couldn't really set up a super league because they couldn't afford to pay 120 college players in football alone and they couldn't afford to leave conferences with amateur programs, because the schools that choose "pro" cannot compete in anything with traditional schools. Even in blue blood country I do not think their legislatures would allow their purported high prestige schools to become merely arenas for B or C grade professional sports.

Professional-you can be paid but you cannot compete against amateur schools or play in amateur sports. Once you go professional you can never go back. This might be a boom for the USFL, CFL and the G League.

I'd also give the NBA and the NFL collective bargaining waivers if they required their players to be 21.

A departure from my usual free market economics. Just a unique market to which more communal economics apply. It is also a social turning point. However, it's a solution that also gives the players freedom of action. The recruit is or is about to become what we call adults now. They have their first adult decision to make. It's a big one but it is the player's choice about the player's future. Will they bet on themselves to strike gold or will they play it safe?

The status quo is going to be very destructive to college sports and young people in general. It breeds instability and inequity. There are many creative ways to destroy it. So, let's get on that project.​