Miss. lawmaker says 12-year-old incest victims should carry pregnancies to term

cigaretteman

HR King
May 29, 2001
71,528
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On the day that Roe v. Wade was struck down, Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn (R) was asked whether the state’s restrictive law banning almost all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy would apply to 12-year-old girls who are victims of incest.

The Republican leader said Friday that while he was unaware “what the legislature’s appetite” would be for allowing young victims of rape and incest to get an abortion, the law “does not include an exception for incest.” He then emphasized that he did not think the Mississippi government should revisit the matter.
“I believe life begins at conception,” he said at a news conference. “Every life is valuable. And those are my personal beliefs.”

After a journalist asked Gunn again whether a “12-year-old child molested by her family members should carry that pregnancy to term,” the speaker confirmed that’s what he believed was right.

“That is my personal belief,” Gunn answered. “I believe life begins at conception.”

Gunn’s remarks echo similar sentiments expressed by Republicans such as South Dakota Gov. Kristi L. Noem in the days since the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. The comments, which have met with blowback from liberals and women’s rights advocates, circulated widely Wednesday, with a video of the exchange posted to Twitter being viewed more than 500,000 times.

A spokesperson for Gunn did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday.
The Mississippi Free Press first reported Gunn’s comments.
The fallout from last week’s historic ruling continued Thursday with President Biden calling for altering Senate filibuster rules to codify into law abortion rights and privacy protections in what is the most aggressive position he has staked out on reproductive rights. Biden, who previously has been reluctant to support changing the decades-old Senate filibuster rules, took a more combative approach in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision last week to overturn Roe.










“I believe we have to codify Roe v. Wade in the law, and the way to do that is to make sure the Congress votes to do that,” the president said during a news conference in Madrid. “And if the filibuster gets in the way, it’s like voting rights; it should be — we provide an exception for this.”
Biden calls for suspending filibuster rules to guarantee abortion rights
Although 13 states have “trigger bans” designed to take effect once Roe was struck down, prohibiting abortions within 30 days of the ruling, some judges have temporarily blocked the laws from being implemented. In Texas, Harris County Judge Christine Weems (D) granted a temporary restraining order to allow clinics to offer abortions for at least two weeks without criminal prosecution, saying that enforcing a pre-Roe ban would “inevitably and irreparably chill the provision of abortions in the vital last weeks in which safer abortion care remains available and lawful in Texas.” A Florida judge on Thursday blocked a new law to ban abortions in the state after 15 weeks of pregnancy, saying the measure violates the privacy provision of the state’s constitution.
Florida judge blocks new law that would ban abortions after 15 weeks
Republicans have celebrated the end of Roe in the past week, with former vice president Mike Pence going so far as to call for a national abortion ban. Some GOP leaders, including Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, have appeared to express support for Justice Clarence Thomas’s concurring opinion that the Supreme Court could review other precedents that may be deemed “demonstrably erroneous.” But other Republicans in midterm races have often avoided questions or been at pains to shift the topic, and Democrats have leaned heavily into elevating the concerns over the court ruling and the new limits that will be imposed on abortions.









Gunn is not the only Republican to support no exceptions to legal abortions. Noem, the South Dakota governor, echoed the sentiment, telling CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday that she did not support legal abortion in cases of rape. The governor, considered a potential GOP presidential contender in 2024, cited the importance of building “stronger families.”
“I’ve never believed that having a tragedy or a tragic situation happen to someone is a reason to have another tragedy to occur,” said Noem, who has called for a special legislative session to bolster the state’s trigger law that immediately banned abortion. “I would prefer that we continue to go forward and that we’re putting resources in front of these women and walking alongside them.”

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) also was asked on NBC’s “Meet the Press” about whether he was comfortable knowing a 13-year-old who was raped by a family member could not get an abortion in the state.



“I would prefer a different outcome than that, but that’s not the debate today in Arkansas,” Hutchinson told program host Chuck Todd on Sunday. “It might be in the future, but for now, the law triggered with only one exception … as you said, in the case of the life of the mother.”
Data cited by the nonprofit Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) shows that 93 percent of the juvenile victims who made sexual abuse complaints to law enforcement knew the alleged perpetrators. More than one-third of juvenile victims who suffer sexual abuse say the act was committed by a family member, according to RAINN.
Speaking on the Mississippi House floor last week, Gunn said the Supreme Court decision was “a profound change in the law in our country.” During his remarks on abortion and the state’s law, Gunn was initially asked by a reporter with the Associated Press, “What about the case of a 12-year-old girl who was molested by her father or uncle?”



“No, [the law] does not include an exception for incest,” Gunn said. “I don’t know if that will be changed.”
At that point, in response to the question about incest, Gunn cited his personal belief that “life begins at conception.”
“These other things that y’all are talking about are certainly things we can talk about moving forward. I do not want those things to detract from the significance of this day,” Gunn said, according to the Free Press. “I’m afraid if we get too far afield from what we’re talking about today, that will overshadow the significance of this day.”
Critics on social media blasted Gunn’s remarks. Among them were Democrats in other states who say the Mississippi lawmaker’s beliefs are similar to those of GOP officials in their own states.

“Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn is not alone,” tweeted Virginia state Sen. Ghazala Hashmi (D). “We have GOP state Senators in Virginia preparing to introduce similar bills, completely banning abortion. Such bans would force traumatized children to give birth.”
Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves (R) joined Gunn on Wednesday in celebrating the overturning of Roe. The governor did so by formally proclaiming June to be “Sanctity of Life Month.”

 

NoleATL

HR Legend
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Jul 11, 2007
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OK ciggy, now what's the difference between what was said in the article and your headline?
Not a thing other than the fact Cig said it in fewer words:

"On the day that Roe v. Wade was struck down, Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn (R) was asked whether the state’s restrictive law banning almost all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy would apply to 12-year-old girls who are victims of incest.

The Republican leader said Friday that while he was unaware “what the legislature’s appetite” would be for allowing young victims of rape and incest to get an abortion, the law “does not include an exception for incest.” He then emphasized that he did not think the Mississippi government should revisit the matter."
 
May 27, 2010
15,289
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26ff83dc246877c5a1acbc8f6812905f_400x400.png


Looks about right.
 

Colonoscopy

HR All-American
Silver Member
Feb 20, 2022
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50
On the day that Roe v. Wade was struck down, Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn (R) was asked whether the state’s restrictive law banning almost all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy would apply to 12-year-old girls who are victims of incest.

The Republican leader said Friday that while he was unaware “what the legislature’s appetite” would be for allowing young victims of rape and incest to get an abortion, the law “does not include an exception for incest.” He then emphasized that he did not think the Mississippi government should revisit the matter.
“I believe life begins at conception,” he said at a news conference. “Every life is valuable. And those are my personal beliefs.”

After a journalist asked Gunn again whether a “12-year-old child molested by her family members should carry that pregnancy to term,” the speaker confirmed that’s what he believed was right.

“That is my personal belief,” Gunn answered. “I believe life begins at conception.”

Gunn’s remarks echo similar sentiments expressed by Republicans such as South Dakota Gov. Kristi L. Noem in the days since the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization. The comments, which have met with blowback from liberals and women’s rights advocates, circulated widely Wednesday, with a video of the exchange posted to Twitter being viewed more than 500,000 times.

A spokesperson for Gunn did not immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday.
The Mississippi Free Press first reported Gunn’s comments.
The fallout from last week’s historic ruling continued Thursday with President Biden calling for altering Senate filibuster rules to codify into law abortion rights and privacy protections in what is the most aggressive position he has staked out on reproductive rights. Biden, who previously has been reluctant to support changing the decades-old Senate filibuster rules, took a more combative approach in the aftermath of the Supreme Court’s decision last week to overturn Roe.










“I believe we have to codify Roe v. Wade in the law, and the way to do that is to make sure the Congress votes to do that,” the president said during a news conference in Madrid. “And if the filibuster gets in the way, it’s like voting rights; it should be — we provide an exception for this.”
Biden calls for suspending filibuster rules to guarantee abortion rights
Although 13 states have “trigger bans” designed to take effect once Roe was struck down, prohibiting abortions within 30 days of the ruling, some judges have temporarily blocked the laws from being implemented. In Texas, Harris County Judge Christine Weems (D) granted a temporary restraining order to allow clinics to offer abortions for at least two weeks without criminal prosecution, saying that enforcing a pre-Roe ban would “inevitably and irreparably chill the provision of abortions in the vital last weeks in which safer abortion care remains available and lawful in Texas.” A Florida judge on Thursday blocked a new law to ban abortions in the state after 15 weeks of pregnancy, saying the measure violates the privacy provision of the state’s constitution.
Florida judge blocks new law that would ban abortions after 15 weeks
Republicans have celebrated the end of Roe in the past week, with former vice president Mike Pence going so far as to call for a national abortion ban. Some GOP leaders, including Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, have appeared to express support for Justice Clarence Thomas’s concurring opinion that the Supreme Court could review other precedents that may be deemed “demonstrably erroneous.” But other Republicans in midterm races have often avoided questions or been at pains to shift the topic, and Democrats have leaned heavily into elevating the concerns over the court ruling and the new limits that will be imposed on abortions.









Gunn is not the only Republican to support no exceptions to legal abortions. Noem, the South Dakota governor, echoed the sentiment, telling CBS’s “Face the Nation” on Sunday that she did not support legal abortion in cases of rape. The governor, considered a potential GOP presidential contender in 2024, cited the importance of building “stronger families.”
“I’ve never believed that having a tragedy or a tragic situation happen to someone is a reason to have another tragedy to occur,” said Noem, who has called for a special legislative session to bolster the state’s trigger law that immediately banned abortion. “I would prefer that we continue to go forward and that we’re putting resources in front of these women and walking alongside them.”

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) also was asked on NBC’s “Meet the Press” about whether he was comfortable knowing a 13-year-old who was raped by a family member could not get an abortion in the state.



“I would prefer a different outcome than that, but that’s not the debate today in Arkansas,” Hutchinson told program host Chuck Todd on Sunday. “It might be in the future, but for now, the law triggered with only one exception … as you said, in the case of the life of the mother.”
Data cited by the nonprofit Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN) shows that 93 percent of the juvenile victims who made sexual abuse complaints to law enforcement knew the alleged perpetrators. More than one-third of juvenile victims who suffer sexual abuse say the act was committed by a family member, according to RAINN.
Speaking on the Mississippi House floor last week, Gunn said the Supreme Court decision was “a profound change in the law in our country.” During his remarks on abortion and the state’s law, Gunn was initially asked by a reporter with the Associated Press, “What about the case of a 12-year-old girl who was molested by her father or uncle?”



“No, [the law] does not include an exception for incest,” Gunn said. “I don’t know if that will be changed.”
At that point, in response to the question about incest, Gunn cited his personal belief that “life begins at conception.”
“These other things that y’all are talking about are certainly things we can talk about moving forward. I do not want those things to detract from the significance of this day,” Gunn said, according to the Free Press. “I’m afraid if we get too far afield from what we’re talking about today, that will overshadow the significance of this day.”
Critics on social media blasted Gunn’s remarks. Among them were Democrats in other states who say the Mississippi lawmaker’s beliefs are similar to those of GOP officials in their own states.

“Mississippi House Speaker Philip Gunn is not alone,” tweeted Virginia state Sen. Ghazala Hashmi (D). “We have GOP state Senators in Virginia preparing to introduce similar bills, completely banning abortion. Such bans would force traumatized children to give birth.”
Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves (R) joined Gunn on Wednesday in celebrating the overturning of Roe. The governor did so by formally proclaiming June to be “Sanctity of Life Month.”


"If all incest babies were aborted, I wouldn't be here talking to you today, nor would most of Mississippi's population exist."
 

Jerome Silberman

HR Legend
Oct 30, 2009
12,141
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“I believe life begins at conception.”

They're coming for in vitro next.

The UIOWA IV clinic is already holding staff meeting to game plan for the inevitable law changes to come. There is already an uptick in worried patients with concerns about their treatment schedules.

And I was told this before Reynolds requested the fetal heartbeat law to be re-reviewed.
 

markfromj

HR Legend
Sep 1, 2004
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As some of you know, I am anti-choice, even in the case of rape and incest, as I believe legally protected life should begin at in-utero conception, even in the case of a forced conception (it’s still a life to me). My one exception is to save the mother (have to choose one life over the other). But…

I think I could support another exception: Pregnancy of a girl under (say) 16 from rape or incest. Below that age (maybe) just too much to ask her to bear.
 
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goldmom

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Mar 29, 2002
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As some of you know, I am anti-choice, even in the case of rape and incest, as I believe legally protected life should begin at in-utero conception, even in the case of a forced conception (it’s still a life to me). My one exception is to save the mother (have to choose one life over the other). But…

I think I could support another exception: Pregnancy of a girl under (say) 16 from rape or incest. Below that age (maybe) just too much to ask her to bear.
But but but life...conception...fetus doesn’t know it’s being hosted by a 12 year old...🙄

All I can say is that if my daughter had been raped by anyone she would have gone wherever we needed to terminate any resulting pregnancy.

If they try this crap in Florida I suddenly feel the need to NOT vote Republican.
 

Hawkeye009

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Mar 2, 2003
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Not necessarily. Some of the pills inhibit ovulation.

They are still coming for that because, as I understand it, some of the medicine could prevent implantation if an egg happened to be released. And whether that's true or not, they think it to be true and don't care about the impact on women.
 
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globalhawk

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Dec 16, 2003
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But but but life...conception...fetus doesn’t know it’s being hosted by a 12 year old...🙄

All I can say is that if my daughter had been raped by anyone she would have gone wherever we needed to terminate any resulting pregnancy.

If they try this crap in Florida I suddenly feel the need to NOT vote Republican.
Is Florida going to 15-weeks?
 

Tom Paris

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Oct 1, 2001
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But but but life...conception...fetus doesn’t know it’s being hosted by a 12 year old...🙄

All I can say is that if my daughter had been raped by anyone she would have gone wherever we needed to terminate any resulting pregnancy.

If they try this crap in Florida I suddenly feel the need to NOT vote Republican.
I mean this as a compliment…I pity the person who would try to hurt one of your family members. They would get what’s coming to them.
 
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NoleATL

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You know, I think Chis is right about this American Christian Taliban stuff. The Republican Party has gone completely batshit crazy. Like way worse than I thought possible.
He is, and one day we'll look back and say "how did we not know"? When state lawmakers look to preventing women from going to another state for an abortion, that is Taliban stuff right there...
 

ft254

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Jun 3, 2003
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But but but life...conception...fetus doesn’t know it’s being hosted by a 12 year old...🙄

All I can say is that if my daughter had been raped by anyone she would have gone wherever we needed to terminate any resulting pregnancy.

If they try this crap in Florida I suddenly feel the need to NOT vote Republican.
The Supreme Court's Roe ruling didn't pop up out of thin air. It was the culmination of review of tragic and savage stories and lost lives. Abortion has been here through history and will always be here.

It will take years, maybe decades before these radical dinosaurs on the SCOTUS die off or are replaced and abortion will be legalized again as a humane and practical matter.
 

goldmom

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Mar 29, 2002
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The Supreme Court's Roe ruling didn't pop up out of thin air. It was the culmination of review of tragic and savage stories and lost lives. Abortion has been here through history and will always be here.

It will take years, maybe decades before these radical dinosaurs on the SCOTUS die off or are replaced and abortion will be legalized again as a humane and practical matter.
If state governments codify it as a legal and private matter there is no need to involve the SCOTUS.
Vote for people who see it that way at the STATE level.
 

goldmom

HR Legend
Mar 29, 2002
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Some may just thin the uterine lining, but I think most do both.

The pills now prescribed are most often lower doses than the first pills on the market in the 60’s and one of the benefits is that they suppress ovulation, which is recognized as beneficial in lowering the incidence of ovarian cancer.

Woe to any cave dwelling legislators who try to deny a health benefit to women voters. 🤯
 

hawkbirch

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Nov 24, 2015
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Man arguing with woman on this topic. Bad decision.
It's not men, it's uneducated people. There are so many examples of scientifically inaccurate things that uneducated people say and believe as they make arguments against abortion. I don't think that it's too much to ask for legislators to understand basic biology before they get to make laws that affect decisions I can make about my body.