New studies show Vitamin D and Zinc are Covid treatments

Finance85

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This theory has been posted before, and dismissed by a group of posters who always challenge studies that don't agree with them or their politics.
 

shank hawk

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R. Edgar Hope-Simpson was a pioneer in the study of respiratory disease re: seasonality, Vit D, etc. Brilliant man and way ahead of his time.
 

JWolf74

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So no link to any actual study to review. Just reporting on what 1 random guy said. What a useless article.
 
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nolesincebirth

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Every article I’ve seen says Vitamin D is the number one factor in determining whether someone gets ravaged or a mild case of COVID.

The zinc also helps but if you get the Xi sickness, you’ll want to take a zinc ionophore such as quercetin.
 

DFSNOLE

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So no link to any actual study to review. Just reporting on what 1 random guy said. What a useless article.
I don't know if these qualify.

 

Titus Andronicus

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The pills come in units of 1000 International Units and I confess to taking irregular and random doses ... not really scheduled, of 2-3 pills every two or three days. One of my wife's doctors monitors her vitamin D levels and has her on an actual schedule of two pills a day, sometimes three, sometimes one. His intention is to keep her kidneys functioning at a steady age-appropriate level and he has been successful at this to this point. In some manner, Vitamin D plays into that program.

However, since I weigh 190, should I be prepared to start taking 190 pills at a time? Should I be stocking our medicine cabinet with ten or fifteen bottles of this stuff?

That article is calling for massive doses, making it sound as if this is a case of "More is always better."

A bottle a day keeps the Doctor away?

........................

Zinc has another name when you buy it in vitamin form. I had better get us onto that ... whatever it is called.
 
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billanole

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This thread reminds me of a conversation with wifey recently.
I wish that, by now, we had some simple guidelines to both aid in avoidance as well as aid in recovery.
For instance, somewhere I read/heard that 0 blood types are less likely to have bad Covid results. Is this correct?
Are certain dietary regimes better or worse vs Covid?
A simple guide that can be referenced could surely be put together at this point, since there should by now be ample available data. Or, has data not been collected and sussed out by now?
 

billanole

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The pills come in units of 1000 International Units and I confess to taking irregular and random doses ... not really scheduled, of 2-3 pills every two or three days. One of my wife's doctors monitors her vitamin D levels and has her on an actual schedule of two pills a day, sometimes three, sometimes one. His intention is to keep her kidneys functioning at a steady age-appropriate level and he has been successful at this to this point. In some manner, Vitamin plays into that program.

However, since I weigh 190, should I be prepared to start taking 190 pills at a time? Should I be stocking our medicine cabinet with ten or fifteen bottles of this stuff?

That article is calling for massive doses, making it sound as if this is a case of "More is always better."

A bottle a day keeps the Doctor away?

........................

Zinc has another name when you buy it in vitamin form. I had better get us onto that ... whatever it is called.
I think it was only 1K per pound for a short period, then back to a much lesser amount.
 
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pablow

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For what it's worth according to the Mayo clinic -

For most adults, vitamin D deficiency is not a concern. However, some groups — particularly people who are obese, who have dark skin and who are older than age 65 — may have lower levels of vitamin D due to their diets, little sun exposure or other factors. What are the risks of vitamin D deficiency?
 
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unsubstantiated

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Oct 21, 2004
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I'm in the sun all summer, but I really notice it in the fall. I have to take vit D all winter.

I take a zinc lozenge at the first sign of a cough, sniffle, sore throat, or even a dry throat. I've had about 3 colds in the last 15 years.
 

Titus Andronicus

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Had events played differently and been orchestrated by different folks, I can see a scenario where the mantra would have become:

"Take Vitamin D, Take Zinc!" ... rather than "Wear your mask!"

It just sounds more sensible, and would have been a better call-to-arms in the Covid War.

.....................

This mask mantra belies a simple-minded approach to a very complex problem. I am sure masks do some good, but we are spending way too much of a very scarce resource (our Time!!) on this solution that is the lowest of the common denominators.

I bet getting everyone on huge vitamin does (any vitamin; not necessarily D) would have us on the downside of the curve by now.
 
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pablow

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I'm in the sun all summer, but I really notice it in the fall. I have to take vit D all winter.

I take a zinc lozenge at the first sign of a cough, sniffle, sore throat, or even a dry throat. I've had about 3 colds in the last 15 years.

Apparently, zinc works for the common cold if you take it early. Zinc for the common cold—not if, but when

WHAT’s NEW: Evidence of zinc’s cold relief properties is conclusive
This Cochrane review provides convincing evidence from 13 randomized placebo-controlled trials that taking zinc soon after the onset of symptoms of the common cold significantly reduces both the duration and severity of symptoms.

J Fam Pract. 2011 Nov; 60(11): 669–671.
MCID: PMC3273967
PMID: 22049349
Zinc for the common cold—not if, but when
Goutham Rao, MD and Kate Rowland, MD
 
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billanole

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Had events played differently and been orchestrated by different folks, I can see a scenario where the mantra would have become:

"Take Vitamin D, Take Zinc!" ... rather than "Wear your mask!"

It just sounds more sensible, and would have been a better call-to-arms in the Covid War.

.....................

This mask mantra belies a simple-minded approach to a very complex problem. I am sure masks do some good, but we are spending way too much of a very scarce resource (our Time!!) on this solution which is the lowest of the common denominators.

I bet getting everyone on huge vitamin does (any vitamin; not necessarily D) would have us on the downside of the curve by now.
Methinks that a combination of the strategies would have been wise.
 

hawkeye54545

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I have 4 people in mind who are furiously trying to find articles to dispute this thread. Curious as to which one is first.
 
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NoleATL

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This theory has been posted before, and dismissed by a group of posters who always challenge studies that don't agree with them or their politics.
Months ago my partner said zinc (Emergen-C, etc) had anecdotal evidence of benefit.
 

Titus Andronicus

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This thread reminds me of a conversation with wifey recently.
I wish that, by now, we had some simple guidelines to both aid in avoidance as well as aid in recovery.
For instance, somewhere I read/heard that 0 blood types are less likely to have bad Covid results. Is this correct?
Are certain dietary regimes better or worse vs Covid?
A simple guide that can be referenced could surely be put together at this point, since there should by now be ample available data. Or, has data not been collected and sussed out by now?


Good points all!

My point somewhere else in this thread was that we launched our response with a call to "wear your mask."

The collective level of knowledge and general understanding of what can be done beyond this has advanced very little.

I blame the societies' desire for a glorious leader (Dr. Fauchi? Cuomo? Joe Biden?) to lead us through the wilderness. That is ok, as long as whomever is designated as the glorious leader does not evolve into a one-trick-pony; a Wear-your-mask version.
 

JWolf74

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I don't know if these qualify.

Not really. This stuff has been known for years. Good nutrition is key to keeping your body functioning well. Many adults are vitamin d deficient because of lack of sun. So far I haven't seen a prospective study specifically looking at it's benefit in covid.
 

DFSNOLE

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Not really. This stuff has been known for years. Good nutrition is key to keeping your body functioning well. Many adults are vitamin d deficient because of lack of sun. So far I haven't seen a prospective study specifically looking at it's benefit in covid.
Thanks. I wasn't trying to be a wise ass. I just know that a doctor would obviously read an article from a different perspective.
 
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KFSuperStar

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100% of daily recommended Vitamin C, D, and zinc. A good multivitamin is sufficient.

Feel sick, or exposed 500% recommended C,D and Zinc. Double your water intake.

It’s very strange to me governments around the world haven’t been pushing this.
 

srams21

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I posted this in April and the hyper educated hrot police, you know who they are, laughed me off.
Would a basic daily vitamin that includes Vitamin D and Zinc be a good enough start?
 

Finance85

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Oct 22, 2003
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For what it's worth according to the Mayo clinic -

For most adults, vitamin D deficiency is not a concern. However, some groups — particularly people who are obese, who have dark skin and who are older than age 65 — may have lower levels of vitamin D due to their diets, little sun exposure or other factors. What are the risks of vitamin D deficiency?
Amazingly, there's a very tight correlation with those deficiencies and the demographics of those dying .
 

Joes Place

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Aug 28, 2003
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This theory has been posted before, and dismissed by a group of posters who always challenge studies that don't agree with them or their politics.

Challenged? No

I've stated every time it is posted that those meds don't do anything IF your levels are already normal. They are things to take to ensure you are not deficient.

Go search my prior posts on it. Because that's what I've already said on this; it is OLD NEWS.
 

Finance85

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Oct 22, 2003
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Months ago my partner said zinc (Emergen-C, etc) had anecdotal evidence of benefit.
There were studies in 2010 in the lab showing zinc was effective in slowing the replication of the SARS virus. When I posted that, a notable poster unformed me the lab is very different than the human body. While he's right about his statement, it doesn't always have to be different. That's how we've gotten other cures, right?!
 

Finance85

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Oct 22, 2003
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Challenged? No

I've stated every time it is posted that those meds don't do anything IF your levels are already normal. They are things to take to ensure you are not deficient.

Go search my prior posts on it. Because that's what I've already said on this; it is OLD NEWS.
Liar
 

Hawk_4shur

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Jan 2, 2009
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I started taking 2k Vit D about 10 years ago because a Podiatrist told me it was good for my Plantar Fasciitis. I have no earthly idea why, but I have had a lot less arch pain since I started.

Maybe it's kept me COVID free? Big, big, huge bonus.
 

Ozzy4335

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Jul 27, 2020
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Daughter is a nurse and takes care of covid patients. the protocal at the hospital is Vitamin C, Zinc, and Thiamine. One of them Is IV> I think its the thiamine.
 

GOHOX69

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Sep 26, 2009
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Would a basic daily vitamin that includes Vitamin D and Zinc be a good enough start?
Usually no due to the amounts and type. I take zinc picolinate since it's better absorbed 25 mg and 2000 to 5000 iu of cholecalciferol or vitamin d3, the active form of vitamin d. Besides covid, vitamin d has had a good track record in oncology. Good health to you and happy holidays.
 
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Joes Place

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There were studies in 2010 in the lab showing zinc was effective in slowing the replication of the SARS virus.
There were numerous studies showing remdesivir did "in the lab" too.

But it ain't terribly effective in vivo.

Big big difference.
 

Joes Place

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Aug 28, 2003
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This theory has been posted before, and dismissed by a group of posters who always challenge studies that don't agree with them or their politics.

When someone linked a Yahoo story on masks, they actually cited the author, so I was able to find that study and link it in the thread.

I see no links to any of the claimed studies here. Perhaps you can find and link them for us, to see what the authors actually state.
 

ChrisVarick

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Dec 30, 2012
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Every article I’ve seen says Vitamin D is the number one factor in determining whether someone gets ravaged or a mild case of COVID.

The zinc also helps but if you get the Xi sickness, you’ll want to take a zinc ionophore such as quercetin.

This is a tough one. We know that old people are the ones heavily affected. We also know old people have issues processing Vitamin D so they show as deficient.

So these studies that show a bunch of people that are hospitalized or die