NIL isn't the problem . . .

FWIW4922463

HR All-State
Apr 1, 2021
874
2,543
93
With all the money in college sports, NIL is only fair and reasonable, and it should have come along much sooner. So the problem isn't NIL, it's that it has come without any regulation. There needs to be a national set of rules defining what is acceptable and what isn't. It's anarchy now, and that obviously isn't fair or reasonable. I know the NCAA has washed its hands of NIL, but somebody has to establish rules and have the ability to enforce them. And because NIL applies to all college students, not just athletes, perhaps college presidents should get together and establish the rules and be responsible for enforcement.

With media companies and advertisers and others making millions and billions off college sports, it's only fair that the athletes who make all that possible share in the revenue. But the NIL process now is severely flawed. The sooner that is rectified, the better.
 

LaQuintaHawkeye

HR All-American
Dec 16, 2017
4,474
6,399
113
IMO, the first change that needs to be put in place is that for every dollar some donor(s) or organization puts up for a highly rated recruit/player, an equal/matching dollar amount needs to also be put up by said donor/organization for a “general player fund” to be used on non-revenue sports. This could be allocated at the discretion of the school AD.
 

Lumas Etima

HR All-State
Apr 1, 2003
938
1,292
93
There are salary caps in pro sports, but those don’t apply to endorsement deals, right? With NIL, it’s all basically “endorsement” money, which I think is harder to regulate than basic salaries.

That said, I agree with the OP in that the lack of regulation is a huge problem. At some point, you’ve got to put some rules in place to protect the concept of fair play.
 

Hawk_4shur

HR Legend
Jan 2, 2009
15,131
19,991
113
With all the money in college sports, NIL is only fair and reasonable, and it should have come along much sooner. So the problem isn't NIL, it's that it has come without any regulation. There needs to be a national set of rules defining what is acceptable and what isn't. It's anarchy now, and that obviously isn't fair or reasonable. I know the NCAA has washed its hands of NIL, but somebody has to establish rules and have the ability to enforce them. And because NIL applies to all college students, not just athletes, perhaps college presidents should get together and establish the rules and be responsible for enforcement.

With media companies and advertisers and others making millions and billions off college sports, it's only fair that the athletes who make all that possible share in the revenue. But the NIL process now is severely flawed. The sooner that is rectified, the better.
Got any ideas how to regulate it? Can a kid make $25,000, but not $26,000? The reason NIL was successful in court was the whole free enterprise issue. Get what you can get - get what you are worth - get your share of the pie.

The notion of NIL was that somehow it was fair. Pay a kid $10,000 for autographs, t-shirts, appearances, etc. Paying a kid millions for NIL? There is no business sense to it - there is no return on investment to the payor. It's just people with too much money that want their team to win.
 

DodgerHawki

HR Heisman
Nov 19, 2002
9,459
11,070
113
Got any ideas how to regulate it? Can a kid make $25,000, but not $26,000? The reason NIL was successful in court was the whole free enterprise issue. Get what you can get - get what you are worth - get your share of the pie.

The notion of NIL was that somehow it was fair. Pay a kid $10,000 for autographs, t-shirts, appearances, etc. Paying a kid millions for NIL? There is no business sense to it - there is no return on investment to the payor. It's just people with too much money that want their team to win.
Correct. There are folks who run businesses or just generally have a lot of $ and like spending it to see their favorite school win. There is no business sense to the large amounts of money being given to recruits just to go to a school.

As you pointed out, I'm not sure how it gets regulated at all now that it's happening. Are businesses required to give back money if a new product exceeds sales forecasts? If I have a photography business and someone is willing to pay me $100,000 for photos of their wedding, no one would give it a second thought (other than saying that's ridiculous to spend that amount of money).

I don't know where all of this ends up. The market will stabilize to an extent I would think. But I do think it's possible that the lower-level schools will be hugely hit. With the free transfer and NIL money, every player that is good at a MAC school is going to explore what they are worth at a Big 10 or SEC school.
 
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DavidHawk324

HR MVP
Jul 4, 2002
1,692
973
113
IMO, the first change that needs to be put in place is that for every dollar some donor(s) or organization puts up for a highly rated recruit/player, an equal/matching dollar amount needs to also be put up by said donor/organization for a “general player fund” to be used on non-revenue sports. This could be allocated at the discretion of the school AD.
Why? You could argue that the non-revenue athletes are already getting an excessively nice deal by getting a full scholarship for playing a sport that costs the athletic department money. Why should they get even more money compared to a normal student if they aren’t bringing any money into the university?
 

GoEagles23

Scout Team
Sep 12, 2013
131
167
43
NIL is like a tsunami: you know it's coming, yet you cannot do anything to stop the irreparable damage it has and will cause to amateur sports
 
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Madhawk83

Team MVP
Gold Member
Jun 26, 2019
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Why? You could argue that the non-revenue athletes are already getting an excessively nice deal by getting a full scholarship for playing a sport that costs the athletic department money. Why should they get even more money compared to a normal student if they aren’t bringing any money into the university?
Equity. You get paid for other people's value to make sure it's fair. Who cares that you're playing a sport literally nobody watches. You make zero money for either the university of the person that you have an NIL deal with but hey at least it's fair.
 

Madhawk83

Team MVP
Gold Member
Jun 26, 2019
215
229
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Got any ideas how to regulate it? Can a kid make $25,000, but not $26,000? The reason NIL was successful in court was the whole free enterprise issue. Get what you can get - get what you are worth - get your share of the pie.

The notion of NIL was that somehow it was fair. Pay a kid $10,000 for autographs, t-shirts, appearances, etc. Paying a kid millions for NIL? There is no business sense to it - there is no return on investment to the payor. It's just people with too much money that want their team to win.
No,such thing as "too much money" In regards to the business sense you're right it doesn't make business sense but we went down this NIL road and now it needs to be seen to it's logical conclusion. I can't think of any private sector jobs that has a body that limits outside contracts. The NBA can't say LeBron makes too much money from Nike.
 
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Hawk_4shur

HR Legend
Jan 2, 2009
15,131
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No,such thing as "too much money" In regards to the business sense you're right it doesn't make business sense but we went down this NIL road and now it needs to be seen to it's logical conclusion. I can't think of any private sector jobs that has a body that limits outside contracts. The NBA can't say LeBron makes too much money from Nike.
I think you are right - you can't really cap NIL. But, there is this ....


82402933.jpg
 

Madhawk83

Team MVP
Gold Member
Jun 26, 2019
215
229
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I think you are right - you can't really cap NIL. But, there is this ....


82402933.jpg
Well unless they are doing something truly illegal people should be allowed to be foolish with their money. That's the cool thing about something being yours.
 
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Hawk_4shur

HR Legend
Jan 2, 2009
15,131
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Well unless they are doing something truly illegal people should be allowed be foolish with their money. That's the cool thing about something being yours.
It is. It's also one of the things that doesn't come with instructions. Having children is another one.

It's America - you are free to be as dumb as you want!
 

LaQuintaHawkeye

HR All-American
Dec 16, 2017
4,474
6,399
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Why? You could argue that the non-revenue athletes are already getting an excessively nice deal by getting a full scholarship for playing a sport that costs the athletic department money. Why should they get even more money compared to a normal student if they aren’t bringing any money into the university?
First off, many of those non-revenue athletes aren’t getting full scholarships.

Second, it’s a way to keep NIL (ie free agency) in check and balance it out a little bit for the non-revenue sports athletes. It’s not going to equal out, nor should it, but it’s still something for the baseball, wrestling, women’s sports, etc. The matching funds could also go to lesser rated fball/mbb players.

Third, as it appears to be trending right now, NIL isn’t going to be about which players bring in the most money for the school, it’s going to be about which player/recruit has the best press clippings/PR to get the attention of donors and local organizations marketing teams. Many of these kids may not even pan out on the field/court.
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,418
6,192
113
IMO, the first change that needs to be put in place is that for every dollar some donor(s) or organization puts up for a highly rated recruit/player, an equal/matching dollar amount needs to also be put up by said donor/organization for a “general player fund” to be used on non-revenue sports. This could be allocated at the discretion of the school AD.
Fok that...
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,418
6,192
113
Got any ideas how to regulate it? Can a kid make $25,000, but not $26,000? The reason NIL was successful in court was the whole free enterprise issue. Get what you can get - get what you are worth - get your share of the pie.

The notion of NIL was that somehow it was fair. Pay a kid $10,000 for autographs, t-shirts, appearances, etc. Paying a kid millions for NIL? There is no business sense to it - there is no return on investment to the payor. It's just people with too much money that want their team to win.
And many if these folks got "too much money" by taking advantage of folks...some players will get added to their list. Hope they all have good lawyers reading their deals!!
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,418
6,192
113
Why? You could argue that the non-revenue athletes are already getting an excessively nice deal by getting a full scholarship for playing a sport that costs the athletic department money. Why should they get even more money compared to a normal student if they aren’t bringing any money into the university?
Because people are nuts these days!!
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,418
6,192
113
No,such thing as "too much money" In regards to the business sense you're right it doesn't make business sense but we went down this NIL road and now it needs to be seen to it's logical conclusion. I can't think of any private sector jobs that has a body that limits outside contracts. The NBA can't say LeBron makes too much money from Nike.
Nike invests in players...the donors are just trying to buy wins.
 

nbanflfactory

HR Heisman
Aug 22, 2021
6,418
6,192
113
Well unless they are doing something truly illegal people should be allowed to be foolish with their money. That's the cool thing about something being yours.
You realize there a bill in Congress to allow companies to decide if we are allowed to sell on their goods...goods we purchased and own!?!?

Ownership, not so fast ;)
 

onlyTheObvious

HR Heisman
Jan 3, 2021
5,903
6,902
113
Why? You could argue that the non-revenue athletes are already getting an excessively nice deal by getting a full scholarship for playing a sport that costs the athletic department money. Why should they get even more money compared to a normal student if they aren’t bringing any money into the university?
Agreed. Look at woman’s crew as the best example. Completely made up sport where the athletes get all the perks.
 

Lumas Etima

HR All-State
Apr 1, 2003
938
1,292
93
How about this for a way to regulate NIL (and bear in mind, I am just throwing this up against the wall for discussion. I really don’t know if it would work and/or be legal):

Colleges should leverage the collectives being formed across the country as the mechanism both for payments and regulation. Every school would be allowed to form a collective, as they are now; but with this proposal, colleges would openly affiliate with their collective. But they could only affiliate with one. Each collective would be able to compensate players as they see fit, but all other forms of compensation would be banned. No outside deals.

Then, we simply put in place a limit as to how big (how much value) collectives can be. If there is a split coming among D-1 schools, it could be along the lines of the size of the collectives. The super-league would have the biggest collectives, but other schools could choose to stay at a lower level by maintaining smaller collectives. But regardless, the idea would be that there is some kind of competitive balance among the schools at each level of collective size. In essence, it’s a form of salary cap.

I also love the idea that NIL money be reserved for second-year players.
 

Mccusk34

Scout Team
Gold Member
Jul 25, 2019
78
122
33
Any regulation would have to come from legislation either state or federal. The NCAA cannot tell private businesses how they can spend their money.
Enacting some NIL rule would be as effective as most recruiting rules, would just serve as window dressing for the schools that choose to violate it and act as a crutch for the schools that follow those rules.
 
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littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
7,315
5,973
113
Given this was a supreme court decision I guess it must be fair to say that the conservative dominated court has now become "Woke". Did anyone tell Ginny Thomas that her husband is woke?
They're rolling Hawkdiver. Let them be. It gives them the chance to say "woke." Gets them very excited.
 

Kurt Warner

HR Heisman
Jan 12, 2010
6,628
8,483
113
Iowa
Freedom to contract is part of the woke movement. 😂

Everything you don’t like = woke

These guys are already getting paid with free school, free board, free food, free tutoring, free medical if they get injured and probably many more freebies. I call NIL part of the woke because it is, it's people feeling sorry for these guys because they are bringing in a lot of money and not getting paid when in all actuality they are (with the above mentioned) And it also takes a lot of money to to cover all expenses. But oh no, some bleeding hearts think these players are not getting enough even though no one is forcing them to do it and it's what they want to do.

Now look what is happening, it's an out of control mess. And it's all because some dips in control felt sorry for these guys thinking the players are being mistreated. So yeah, it realty it is part of the "woke movement"
 
Feb 25, 2008
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This entire problem began with the invention of SOCIAL MEDIA.

It gave this generation too much entitlement and less respect.
This is true. Never allow the general public to believe their opinions are valued higher than they actually are.

Over-valuing your own opinions is the gateway drug........and social media destroyed that dam with a nuke.
 
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Jun 5, 2002
1,461
1,994
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What the NCAA needs is a rule that does not allow NIL contracts to be discussed/negotiated until a player arrives on campus. NIL was not supposed to be free agency for college sports but it is quickly becoming that for some schools, particularly in the SEC. It's sad and it will ruin college sports.
 
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