Renters face charging dilemma in the race to make every car an EV....

TheCainer

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This was a known issue and it's part of the reason there is a big investment in the infrastructure bill to increase charging stations around the country. There are definitely going to be some growing pains with this though.
Exactly. The same kind of pains were going on when gas powered vehicles were introduced early last century. There weren't gas stations on every corner back then either.

This kind of problem presents opportunities for the aggressive visionaries to become wealthy through innovative thinking and actions, something the OP will probably never understand.
 
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TJ8869

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Exactly. The same kind of pains were going on when gas powered vehicles were introduced early last century. There weren't gas stations on every corner back then either.
True, but we also didn’t ban the sale of horses when gas powered vehicles were introduced.
 

HawkRCID

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Sounds like someone should have a business opportunity to open up a place to charge vehicles for a fee.
I was thinking the same thing, but my head went to a service in urban areas dropping off big batteries to charge it overnight then picking up and replacing in morning (or whatever frequency is picked by user)

logistics would have to work out, but like a PowerWall sized battery is not out of the question, and I would think that would do it.

Power delivery service. Either way, this article just screamed massive business opportunity to me though for someone near one of these massive urban areas.
 

onlyTheObvious

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Sounds like someone should have a business opportunity to open up a place to charge vehicles for a fee.
True but the problem areas likely are urban where land is super expensive.

the future is wireless charging with big magnets that spin a charging motor already in car.

5da08aab045a31025e442057
 

The Tradition

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Huh?? Define acceptable. 60k will put you in some very nice sedans and SUVs. Even among the luxury brands.

Acceptable = Leather seats and trim. The upgraded infotainment/navigation system with the up-sized touchscreen and upgraded audio/speakers. The large wheels. All wheel drive. Moon roof. Roof racks. Floor mats and spill container mat for the cargo area. The latest safety intelligence software. No empty slots on the dash or grill where "upgraded" buttons or lights would be if you bought the top-of-line model.

Me: "What's this blank space on the dash?"

Salesperson: "Oh, that's where the button would be if you had the fog lights upgrade."

I absolutely hate that. If I'm going to buy a car, I want everything that can possibly come with it (except turbo).
 

TJ8869

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Are you saying that gas powered vehicles are now banned??????
In about 12 years, auto makers will be banned from selling new gas-powered vehicles in numerous states. Obviously you’ll still be able to buy used ones, but after a few years that will no longer be a viable option either.
 

mjtommy

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Acceptable = Leather seats and trim. The upgraded infotainment/navigation system with the up-sized touchscreen and upgraded audio/speakers. The large wheels. All wheel drive. Moon roof. Roof racks. Floor mats and spill container mat for the cargo area. The latest safety intelligence software. No empty slots on the dash or grill where "upgraded" buttons or lights would be if you bought the top-of-line model.

Me: "What's this blank space on the dash?"

Salesperson: "Oh, that's where the button would be if you had the fog lights upgrade."

I absolutely hate that. If I'm going to buy a car, I want everything that can possibly come with it (except turbo).
Dodge Challenger GT with everything is $48,885. Took me less than 5 minutes to build it on Dodge.com you can do the same with many others.
 

TJ8869

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Dodge Challenger GT with everything is $48,885. Took me less than 5 minutes to build it on Dodge.com you can do the same with many others.
While I agree there are plenty of perfectly good new gas-powered vehicles under $60K, the Challenger might not be the best one to use as an example. Dodge has already announced they are discontinuing the Challenger and Charger next year and will be transitioning to EVs.
 

TJ8869

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Worst purchase decision ever….you take a massive loss the second you drive out of the dealership. Although Trucks do seem to hold value.
Blanket statements like this make me shake my head. It depends on a number of factors. In some cases it’s a terrible decision. In some cases it makes perfect sense.
 

West Duval Nole

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90% of people have no business buying new cars.
Will not buy a new car until I am a millionaire which should be in about 6 years or so. And will pay for it in cash up front. No more car payments ever. Even when I hit millionaire status , I will probably still buy a used in good condition with decent mileage. My mindset has changed as I have gotten older. I prefer no debt and less money (less than 50% of my annual income) put in all depreciating assets combined. If I would have followed that ratio and mindset starting when I was 25, I would have been a millionaire about 7-10 years ago.
 

Kinnick.At.Night

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Acceptable = Leather seats and trim. The upgraded infotainment/navigation system with the up-sized touchscreen and upgraded audio/speakers. The large wheels. All wheel drive. Moon roof. Roof racks. Floor mats and spill container mat for the cargo area. The latest safety intelligence software. No empty slots on the dash or grill where "upgraded" buttons or lights would be if you bought the top-of-line model.

Me: "What's this blank space on the dash?"

Salesperson: "Oh, that's where the button would be if you had the fog lights upgrade."

I absolutely hate that. If I'm going to buy a car, I want everything that can possibly come with it (except turbo).
I have all of that and more in my Acura RDX. It cost me 42K in early 2021.
 
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mjtommy

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While I agree there are plenty of perfectly good new gas-powered vehicles under $60K, the Challenger might not be the best one to use as an example. Dodge has already announced they are discontinuing the Challenger and Charger next year and will be transitioning to EVs.
I knew that. My point was it’s easy to find and acceptable car for under 60k. I can build a loaded Honda Accord Hybrid Touring for under 45k. Same thing goes of a Toyota Corolla or if you want some power I can do a V8 Mustang or Camaro.

Trad just wants to keep moving the goalposts and not accept that he’s full of shit with his statement. BAU for him I guess.
 

The Tradition

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I knew that. My point was it’s easy to find and acceptable car for under 60k. I can build a loaded Honda Accord Hybrid Touring for under 45k. Same thing goes of a Toyota Corolla or if you want some power I can do a V8 Mustang or Camaro.

Trad just wants to keep moving the goalposts and not accept that he’s full of shit with his statement. BAU for him I guess.

I won't drive a sedan. It has to be an SUV (or maybe a truck next time).
 

Joes Place

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PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Stephanie Terrell bought a used Nissan Leaf this fall and was excited to join the wave of drivers adopting electric vehicles to save on gas money and reduce her carbon footprint.

But Terrell quickly encountered a bump in the road on her journey to clean driving: As a renter, she doesn’t have a private garage where she can power up overnight, and the public charging stations near her are often in use, with long wait times. On a recent day, the 23-year-old nearly ran out of power on the freeway because a public charging station she was counting on was busy.

“It was really scary and I was really worried I wasn’t going to make it, but luckily I made it here. Now I have to wait a couple hours to even use it because I can’t go any further,” she said while waiting at another station where a half-dozen EV drivers circled the parking lot, waiting their turn. “I feel better about it than buying gas, but there are problems I didn’t really anticipate.”

The great transition to electric vehicles is underway for single-family homeowners who can charge their cars at home, but for millions of renters like Terrell, access to charging remains a significant barrier. People who rent are also more likely to buy used EVs that have a lower range than the latest models, making reliable public charging even more critical for them.

Now, cities from Portland to Los Angeles to New York City are trying to come up with innovative public charging solutions as drivers string power cords across sidewalks, stand up their own private charging stations on city right-of-ways and line up at public facilities.

The Biden administration last month approved plans from all 50 states to roll out a network of high-speed chargers along interstate highways coast-to-coast using $5 billion in federal funding over the next five years. But states must wait to apply for an additional $2.5 billion in local grants to fill in charging gaps, including in low- and moderate-income areas of cities and in neighborhoods with limited private parking.

“We have a really large challenge right now with making it easy for people to charge who live in apartments,” said Jeff Allen, executive director of Forth, a nonprofit that advocates for equity in electric vehicle ownership and charging access.

“There’s a mental shift that cities have to make to understand that promoting electric cars is also part of their sustainable transportation strategy. Once they make that mental shift, there’s a whole bunch of very tangible things they can — and should — be doing.”

The quickest place to charge is a fast charger, also known as DC Fast. Those charge a car in 20 to 45 minutes. But slower chargers which take several hours, known as Level 2, still outnumber DC fast chargers by nearly four to one, although their numbers are growing. Charging an electric vehicle on a standard residential outlet, or Level 1 charger, isn’t practical unless you drive little or can leave the car plugged in overnight, as many homeowners can.

Nationwide, there are about 120,000 public charging ports featuring Level 2 charging or above, and nearly 1.5 million electric vehicles registered in the U.S. — a ratio of just over one charging port per 12 cars nationally, according to the latest U.S. Department of Energy data from December 2021. But those chargers are not spread out evenly: In Arizona, for example, the ratio of electric vehicles to charging ports is 18 to one and in California, which has about 39% of the nation’s EVs, there are 16 zero-emissions vehicles for every charging port.

A briefing prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy last year by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory forecasts a total of just under 19 million electric vehicles on the road by 2030, with a projected need for an extra 9.6 million charging stations to meet that demand.

In Los Angeles, for example, nearly one-quarter of all new vehicles registered in July were plug-in electric vehicles. The city estimates in the next 20 years, it will have to expand its distribution capacity anywhere from 25% to 50%, with roughly two-thirds of the new power demand coming from electric vehicles, said Yamen Nanne, manager of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power’s transportation electrification program.

Continued...

(Sigh)....If only Infrastructure Week had happened sometime between 2016 and 2020 to "build out" what is necessary for those w/o garages to recharge their EVs....
 

West Duval Nole

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I was thinking the same thing, but my head went to a service in urban areas dropping off big batteries to charge it overnight then picking up and replacing in morning (or whatever frequency is picked by user)

logistics would have to work out, but like a PowerWall sized battery is not out of the question, and I would think that would do it.

Power delivery service. Either way, this article just screamed massive business opportunity to me though for someone near one of these massive urban areas.
I have thought about that too. Was thinking when a manufacturer could figure out a way for there too be an easy swap out of batteries and then put up or incent others to put up stations that will allow people to pull in and swap batteries within 10 mins or less.

When I worked in a warehouse over 25 years ago that was how the forklifts, single and double jacks were. When battery got low, you went to maintenance room and had them swap out the battery for a fully charged one. With cars it is probably more complicated than just a simple plug connection, but was wondering if a manufacturer was considering that.

My guess is that they are trying to find better technology for recharging and hoping more widespread charging stations for people to use and it becoming a more standard house and apartment feature than trying to coordinate or work on that.
 
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HawkRCID

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I have thought about that too. Was thinking when a manufacturer could figure out a way for there too be an easy swap out of batteries and then put up or incent others to put up stations that will allow people to pull in and swap batteries within 10 mins or less.

When I worked in a warehouse over 25 years ago that was how the forklifts, single and double jacks were. When battery got low, you went to maintenance room and had them swap out the battery for a fully charged one. With cars it is probably more complicated than just a simple plug connection, but was wondering if a manufacturer was considering that.

My guess is that they are trying to find better technology for recharging and hoping more widespread charging stations for people to use and it becoming a more standard house and apartment feature than trying to coordinate or work on that.
Yeah, I have always thought swappable batteries would be the holy grail….but given we can’t even get cell phone makers to standardize doubt it happens.

that’s why I started to think about just making a deliverable charging service. Sort of like the charged up external battery packs for phones you can get in some tourist locations from a vending machine.
 
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West Duval Nole

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Yeah, I have always thought swappable batteries would be the holy grail….but given we can’t even get cell phone makers to standardize doubt it happens.

that’s why I started to think about just making a deliverable charging service. Sort of like the charged up external battery packs for phones you can get in some tourist locations from a vending machine.
Yeah. That could be a good idea. A portable recharger. Electric vehicles keep that in their car if they run out and use it to recharge vehicle that would allow them to get X # of miles to a charging station or back home.
 

theiacowtipper

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The point of this thread is that Stephanie is hardly an outlier. There are literally millions of people like her that rent and don’t have reliable access to an EV charger. And in just a few short years ICEs are going to be phased out. We need to make sure people have access to EV charging rather than mocking them for being 23 years old and not owning a home yet.
I’m 56 years old. Pretty healthy. Let’s say I live to 86. ICE vehicles will be available after that’s even
 
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theiacowtipper

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In about 12 years, auto makers will be banned from selling new gas-powered vehicles in numerous states. Obviously you’ll still be able to buy used ones, but after a few years that will no longer be a viable option either.
So people will have to drive to another state to buy an internal combustion engine vehicle. Hey, it works for people needing an abortion so it should work for people wanting a gas powered car.