Republican Congresswoman provides the definition of a woman. (It's worse than you think)

tarheelbybirth

HR King
Apr 17, 2003
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Not surprised. Old white man from the south antagonizing someone who isn’t pure enough for him. Keep it up Adolf.
And here you are again. When you say you're done...you're not done. And when you say you're "black"....

Figure out where that goes. But don't hurt yourself.
 
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NCHawk5

HR Heisman
Gold Member
Aug 7, 2019
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And here you are again. When you say you're done...you're not done. And when you say you're "black"....

Figure out where that goes. But don't hurt yourself.
Why don’t you just come out and call me an Uncle Tom? It would be easier than these subtle remarks about my character you bigot birdbrain
 
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Hoosierhawkeye

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Sep 16, 2008
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I just think it's silly that you think your professors knew your classmates gender just by looking at them. You have no idea if any of your classmates spoke to the professor in advance about their preferences. Your assumption is that in your eyes the students referred to by female pronouns were born female and those they referred to by male pronouns were born male. You could be correct, but you could also be completely off the mark.

Well the professors pro-nouns also matched my own assumptions which where oddly enough 100% correct. And no one ever told me their preferred pro-nouns.

In 2000 to 2004 no one really knew what "preferred pronouns" were. And I never mis-pronouned someone either.

You are trying to convince me that the world does not and never did operate in the way that I know it does and did operate.
 
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sober_teacher

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Mar 26, 2007
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Well the professors pro-nouns also matched my own assumptions which where oddly enough 100% correct. And no one ever told me their preferred pro-nouns.

In 2000 to 2004 no one really knew what "preferred pronouns" were. And I never mis-pronouned someone either.

You are trying to convince me that the world does not and never did operate in the way that I know it does and did operate.

I think we’re discovering that we’ve been operating for a long time under false assumptions because people didn’t speak up very often. I have a hard time believing you never mispronounced someone’s name for example, and more likely that they never corrected you.

There’s a lot of stuff that I know my mom just swallows and doesn’t bring up to my dad about his friends/families because she thinks it’s not worth the trouble. Younger generations don’t think that way anymore.

And I’ll admit the stuff about correct pronouns makes no sense to me but I try to respect peoples wishes if they tell me about it.
 
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gohawks50

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Dec 28, 2010
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Well the professors pro-nouns also matched my own assumptions which where oddly enough 100% correct. And no one ever told me their preferred pro-nouns.

In 2000 to 2004 no one really knew what "preferred pronouns" were. And I never mis-pronouned someone either.

You are trying to convince me that the world does not and never did operate in the way that I know it does and did operate.
I am saying that just because someone looks and dresses like a man or woman, does not mean that they were born that gender. You and your professor are assigning pronouns based on outward appearance. That is fine and probably what the individuals you are addressing prefer, it doesn't mean that their genitalia matches their appearance.
 

Hoosierhawkeye

HR Legend
Sep 16, 2008
46,331
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I think we’re discovering that we’ve been operating for a long time under false assumptions because people didn’t speak up very often. I have a hard time believing you never mispronounced someone’s name for example, and more likely that they never corrected you.

There’s a lot of stuff that I know my mom just swallows and doesn’t bring up to my dad about his friends/families because she thinks it’s not worth the trouble. Younger generations don’t think that way anymore.

And I’ll admit the stuff about correct pronouns makes no sense to me but I try to respect peoples wishes if they tell me about it.

I didn't say I never mis-pronounced someones name. I am saying I never mis-pronouned someone. As in I never applied the wrong pro-nouns to someone.
 

RileyHawk

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Aug 21, 2002
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I didn't say I never mis-pronounced someones name. I am saying I never mis-pronouned someone. As in I never applied the wrong pro-nouns to someone.
Your confidence that you have never misidentified someone simply because you have never been called out on it is misguided.
 
Nov 28, 2010
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Maryland
Sex Redefined: The Idea of 2 Sexes Is Overly Simplistic

Biologists now think there is a larger spectrum than just binary female and male

By Claire Ainsworth, Nature magazine on October 22, 2018

Sex can be much more complicated than it at first seems. According to the simple scenario, the presence or absence of a Y chromosome is what counts: with it, you are male, and without it, you are female. But doctors have long known that some people straddle the boundary—their sex chromosomes say one thing, but their gonads (ovaries or testes) or sexual anatomy say another. Parents of children with these kinds of conditions—known as intersex conditions, or differences or disorders of sex development (DSDs)—often face difficult decisions about whether to bring up their child as a boy or a girl. Some researchers now say that as many as 1 person in 100 has some form of DSD.

When genetics is taken into consideration, the boundary between the sexes becomes even blurrier. Scientists have identified many of the genes involved in the main forms of DSD, and have uncovered variations in these genes that have subtle effects on a person's anatomical or physiological sex. What's more, new technologies in DNA sequencing and cell biology are revealing that almost everyone is, to varying degrees, a patchwork of genetically distinct cells, some with a sex that might not match that of the rest of their body. Some studies even suggest that the sex of each cell drives its behaviour, through a complicated network of molecular interactions. “I think there's much greater diversity within male or female, and there is certainly an area of overlap where some people can't easily define themselves within the binary structure,” says John Achermann, who studies sex development and endocrinology at University College London's Institute of Child Health.

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