So, what did Bill Murray do?

fredjr82

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I remember @FAUlty Gator starting a thread, about comedy not being the same as it used to be. Not like the old days.

"You know what I always thought was funny as a little kid isn't necessarily the same as what's funny now. Things change and the times change, so it's important for me to figure it out," Murray said.

I think Murray does a good job of addressing Faulty and other's concerns about today's comedy. Some things just don't appeal to everyone in present day as they may have in the past. Doesn't make it "wrong" as they try to frame it, just a different time
 

tarheelbybirth

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I remember @FAUlty Gator starting a thread, about comedy not being the same as it used to be. Not like the old days.

"You know what I always thought was funny as a little kid isn't necessarily the same as what's funny now. Things change and the times change, so it's important for me to figure it out," Murray said.

I think Murray does a good job of addressing Faulty and other's concerns about today's comedy. Some things just don't appeal to everyone in present day as they may have in the past. Doesn't make it "wrong" as they try to frame it, just a different time
People are just less likely to turn a blind eye when someone makes fun of them or their "group" these days. They never thought it was particularly funny, they just kept their mouths shut in the past.
 
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IA_HAWKI

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People are just less likely to turn a blind eye when someone makes fun of them or their "group" these days. They never thought it was particularly funny, they just kept their mouths shut in the past.
People also laugh when other groups are the target, but are the quickest to complain when the “making fun” hits too close to home.
 

fredjr82

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They never thought it was particularly funny, they just kept their mouths shut in the past.

I disagree. I'm going to say a lot of folks found those jokes (racist, sexist, in poor taste) funny and probably openly laughed out loud. Today, they probably still do just don't laugh as openly about it. Some don't find it funny anymore as outlooks change.
 
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tarheelbybirth

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I disagree. I'm going to say a lot of folks found those jokes (racist, sexist, in poor taste) funny and probably openly laughed out loud. Today, they probably still do just don't laugh as openly about it. Some don't find it funny anymore as outlooks change.
As was posted above, they were laughing at racist, sexist, in poor taste jokes that didn't target them. The folks being targeted weren't laughing...then or now. The difference now is they push back.
 
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alaskanseminole

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People are just less likely to turn a blind eye when someone makes fun of them or their "group" these days. They never thought it was particularly funny, they just kept their mouths shut in the past.
That's true to some extent, but people aren't as adept at laughing at themselves as they once were either. Things that were once just stereotypes are now called racism. White men can't jump, black people can dance, homosexual [men] know how to dress, etc.
 

tarheelbybirth

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That's true to some extent, but people aren't as adept at laughing at themselves as they once were either. Things that were once just stereotypes are now called racism. White men can't jump, black people can dance, homosexual [men] know how to dress, etc.
You really think minorities found demeaning racial stereotypes - especially when delivered by white comedians - funny? When a white comedian uses a racist or sexist stereotype that targets others, they aren't laughing at themselves.

The Amos and Andy tv show - written, directed, and produced by white men - was very successful. People were watching and laughing - even though the NAACP called it "a gross libel of the Negro and distortion of the truth". A black newspaper reported “Millions of white Americans see this ‘Amos ‘n’ Andy’ picture of Negroes and think the entire race is the same.” The black community wasn't laughing at themselves.
 
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"You know what I always thought was funny as a little kid isn't necessarily the same as what's funny now. Things change and the times change, so it's important for me to figure it out," Murray said.

PC culture requires complete and total assimilation.
 

alaskanseminole

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You really think minorities found demeaning racial stereotypes - especially when delivered by white comedians - funny? When a white comedian uses a racist or sexist stereotype that targets others, they aren't laughing at themselves.

The Amos and Andy tv show - written, directed, and produced by white men - was very successful. People were watching and laughing - even though the NAACP called it "a gross libel of the Negro and distortion of the truth". A black newspaper reported “Millions of white Americans see this ‘Amos ‘n’ Andy’ picture of Negroes and think the entire race is the same.” The black community wasn't laughing at themselves.
That's not a black and white answer (no pun intended) and depends on setting and context. I have close friendships with people of all races and have watched stereo-typical comments been made in front of me, to me, and around me with jeers, jabs and laughter because friends know its not coming from a place of hate. Additionally, I've also watched white comedians make these comments with minorities falling out of their chairs in laughter.

IMO, it depends on the setting and the intent behind the comment/statement. Have people crossed a line over the decades? Absolutely! And I'm sure we can both provide endless examples, but like I said above it's not black and white and each situation should be judged/handled in its own right...these blanked judgements and over-reactions have created a society of easily triggered and offended people. We've lost the ability to laugh at ourselves as well as recognizing our cultural differences.

It's funny, I have a running hidden joke with one of my best friends from High School (who is black). He'll post some random viral video of a black person doing some funny, crazy, etc. stuff. I always chime in with the same gif. Here are a few recent examples:



giphy.gif
 
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NCHawk5

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As was posted above, they were laughing at racist, sexist, in poor taste jokes that didn't target them. The folks being targeted weren't laughing...then or now. The difference now is they push back.
Comedy is comedy. If you’re cracking racist jokes at the water cooler, that’s different. People are getting too soft.
 

FAUlty Gator

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As was posted above, they were laughing at racist, sexist, in poor taste jokes that didn't target them. The folks being targeted weren't laughing...then or now. The difference now is they push back.
Nonsense. Jews, Polacks, blacks, Irish and many other ethnicities and races always had a great sense of humor towards self-denigration when I was growing up. I could remember my father embarrassing the shit out of me in doctors' waiting rooms as he told jokes to whatever nationality was sitting there, about their nationality and everyone laughing about it, especially the person. Many of these groups still do. But there are always those who take themselves way too seriously and those folks are becoming an unsilent majority. You just have to be way more careful now.
 

FAUlty Gator

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I remember @FAUlty Gator starting a thread, about comedy not being the same as it used to be. Not like the old days.

"You know what I always thought was funny as a little kid isn't necessarily the same as what's funny now. Things change and the times change, so it's important for me to figure it out," Murray said.

I think Murray does a good job of addressing Faulty and other's concerns about today's comedy. Some things just don't appeal to everyone in present day as they may have in the past. Doesn't make it "wrong" as they try to frame it, just a different time
Not to mention the audiences are way different. And not that it's a bad thing. Except what we are seeing is more and more people with no sense of humor attending comedy shows. Why do they do that? It's like taking a Vegan to a steak house.
 

fredjr82

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Or they still find it funny but are scared to laugh or admit it's funny because they fear they will be called racist, homophobic or some other label that they don't want to be tagged with.

You should have read my sentence right before the one you quoted!

Today, they probably still find it funny, just don't laugh as openly about it.
 
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tumorboy

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Bill and Lucy Liu feuded during the Charlie's Angels shooting. He didn't get invited back for the sequel.
 
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tarheelbybirth

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Nonsense. Jews, Polacks, blacks, Irish and many other ethnicities and races always had a great sense of humor towards self-denigration when I was growing up. I could remember my father embarrassing the shit out of me in doctors' waiting rooms as he told jokes to whatever nationality was sitting there, about their nationality and everyone laughing about it, especially the person. Many of these groups still do. But there are always those who take themselves way too seriously and those folks are becoming an unsilent majority. You just have to be way more careful now.
LOL...and then they would go home and talk about what an a-hole that guy in the waiting room was. Your father was embarrassing you but you don't think he was offending them? They laughed because it was expected. Now, they don't pretend. The idea that people have made this seismic shift in just a few years is ridiculous...their expectations have changed. That's it.
 

SoFla-Hawkeye

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Or they still find it funny but are scared to laugh or admit it's funny because they fear they will be called racist, homophobic or some other label that they don't want to be tagged with.
Or they laugh because they are afraid of being labeled a woke liberal snowflake. Or an angry black woman. Or some other label that they don't want to be tagged with. 10 years ago my oldest son (biracial) left SoFla and headed off to college in Indiana. We told him he "wasn't in Kansas anymore". Within 3 weeks of classes starting we got a phone call from him. He said, "they talk about me like I am not even there". We encouraged him to find his voice. And use it. Much like many BIPOC kids are doing today.
 
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SeaPA

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Murray was great in Caddyshack & Stripes (well, the first half), and very good in a lot of other roles. I can also see how he might come across as an asshole, his schtick at times in the celebrity golf tournaments gets old.
I'm surprised - but not much - that so many are jumping to his defense when none of us has any remote idea what was done or said. I'm not sure which bothers me more - political correctness, or anti-political correctness.
 
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GOHOX69

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Bill Murray have been accused before. Not his first rodeo. Essentially he's a serial sexual harasser.
 
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People also laugh when other groups are the target, but are the quickest to complain when the “making fun” hits too close to home.
There's a very clear pattern to a certain segment of America that just absolutely cannot wake up every Fing day without looking for something to be "offended" by.

Gotta suck for these morons trying to get their hands on a Therapy Cat. Those things have to be in short supply these days! LOL!
 
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tumorboy

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Bill Murray have been accused before. Not his first rodeo. Essentially he's a serial sexual harasser.
Talented beyond believe. He's near the end of his career so doesn't have the power he once did. Plus, the dynamics have changed in terms of what is apprioate in Hollyweird.
 

IA_HAWKI

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There's a very clear pattern to a certain segment of America that just absolutely cannot wake up every Fing day without looking for something to be "offended" by.

Gotta suck for these morons trying to get their hands on a Therapy Cat. Those things have to be in short supply these days! LOL!
My comment doesn’t have anything to do with what you are implying. You will always have the folks that scour twitter to be outraged about something.

but lets say someone laughs at gay jokes, asian jokes or whatever and says that people just cant take a joke anymore if they get called on it.

Let’s say the person that is laughing has a child with special needs and someone makes a joke about those individuals…do you think the person laughing at those other jokes will be cool with someone making special needs jokes because it is just a joke?

Things hit different when the target hits close to home, but he may be cool with it.
 
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Urohawk

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Will be interesting to see what comes of this. I think Bill Murray, like many artists, is somewhat imbalanced and moody. I think that often adds to one's creativity. He is very thoughtful and intuitive so I take him at his word that he is trying to work it out and make things better.


 
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Madman_1

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Nonsense. Jews, Polacks, blacks, Irish and many other ethnicities and races always had a great sense of humor towards self-denigration when I was growing up. I could remember my father embarrassing the shit out of me in doctors' waiting rooms as he told jokes to whatever nationality was sitting there, about their nationality and everyone laughing about it, especially the person. Many of these groups still do. But there are always those who take themselves way too seriously and those folks are becoming an unsilent majority. You just have to be way more careful now.

My wife's father was Mexican, and owned a mexican restaurant. He had a huge repertoire of ethnic jokes, mostly involving hispanic subjects, that he frequently told to regular patrons of all races.
 

torbee

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I remember @FAUlty Gator starting a thread, about comedy not being the same as it used to be. Not like the old days.

"You know what I always thought was funny as a little kid isn't necessarily the same as what's funny now. Things change and the times change, so it's important for me to figure it out," Murray said.

I think Murray does a good job of addressing Faulty and other's concerns about today's comedy. Some things just don't appeal to everyone in present day as they may have in the past. Doesn't make it "wrong" as they try to frame it, just a different time
I think he handled this situation perfectly. Acknowledged there was a disagreement/incident. Took responsibility for his part in it without resorting to whining about "cancel culture" and instead said he'd evaluate how his actions could have been misperceived/not appreciated. It's notable he didn't apologize or beg forgiveness either, though -- basically said it can be difficult to navigate these kinds of issues these days and that it's right to do so because it's important people feel comfortable.

As usual, Murray is awesome. :)
 

torbee

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That's true to some extent, but people aren't as adept at laughing at themselves as they once were either. Things that were once just stereotypes are now called racism. White men can't jump, black people can dance, homosexual [men] know how to dress, etc.
Those are also just tired, lame cliches and not funny anymore either.

Maybe it was "edgy" to make racist jokes in the 70s and 80s -- I was a collector of those "Truly Tasteless Jokes" books -- but if you look at the jokes in them now, they are hacky and egregious and -- worst of all -- not really clever.
 
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