Some Insurers Dropping Owners Who Install Solar Panels

May 27, 2010
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Looks like an easy way for insurance companies to squeeze more money out of those homeowners with solar while Big Electric finds a way to stifle solar expansion/net metering. Win win for both groups of assholes.
 

The Tradition

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Apr 23, 2002
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Looks like an easy way for insurance companies to squeeze more monetary out of those homeowner with solar while Big Electric finds a way to stifle solar expansion/net metering. Win win from both groups of assholes

I will say that if you put thousands of dollars worth of solar panels on your roof and you expect the insurance company to pay for them if they get damaged in an otherwise-covered situation, then you should expect to pay more in annual premiums.
 
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BioHawk

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Sep 21, 2005
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Solar panels installed to code are bolted through the roof joists. It would be impossible for them to tear off a panel without tearing out that entire section of the roof - joists and all. That would be...something.
A strong enough wind from the right direction could provide enough lift to rip off the entire roof. I know that with tornadoes, it is important to keep the garage door closed so the wind can't get underneath the roof to provide the lift to take the roof off. Obviously solar panels are quite different than garages and I haven't calculated the physics behind it, but I could see a way lift underneath the panel could create an extra level of lift even the hurricane hardened house wasn't designed for. But again, I could be wrong, I don't know the math.
 

The Tradition

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Apr 23, 2002
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A strong enough wind from the right direction could provide enough lift to rip off the entire roof. I know that with tornadoes, it is important to keep the garage door closed so the wind can't get underneath the roof to provide the lift to take the roof off. Obviously solar panels are quite different than garages and I haven't calculated the physics behind it, but I could see a way lift underneath the panel could create an extra level of lift even the hurricane hardened house wasn't designed for. But again, I could be wrong, I don't know the math.

But they're also weighing the roof down, so add that to the calculus....
 

tarheelbybirth

HR King
Apr 17, 2003
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A strong enough wind from the right direction could provide enough lift to rip off the entire roof. I know that with tornadoes, it is important to keep the garage door closed so the wind can't get underneath the roof to provide the lift to take the roof off. Obviously solar panels are quite different than garages and I haven't calculated the physics behind it, but I could see a way lift underneath the panel could create an extra level of lift even the hurricane hardened house wasn't designed for. But again, I could be wrong, I don't know the math.
A wind that powerful would take the roof off regardless. The biggest problem in FL - discovered after Andrew - was how many roofs were literally just sitting on top of homes and weren’t anchored at all. A properly installed roof that’s up to code is going to withstand Cat 3 or 4 winds even with solar panels on it. A Cat 5 doesn’t really care.

All that said, they do make your roof more expensive if a tree falls on it so if you live in FL be careful about what you have close to your house.
 

The Tradition

HR King
Apr 23, 2002
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A wind that powerful would take the roof off regardless. The biggest problem in FL - discovered after Andrew - was how many roofs were literally just sitting on top of homes and weren’t anchored at all. A properly installed roof that’s up to code is going to withstand Cat 3 or 4 winds even with solar panels on it. A Cat 5 doesn’t really care.

All that said, they do make your roof more expensive if a tree falls on it so if you live in FL be careful about what you have close to your house.

What about hail? I can't imagine what that might look like....
 
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tarheelbybirth

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What about hail? I can't imagine what that might look like....
The National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, can attest to the resilience of solar panels against extreme weather. NREL is home to an enormous solar energy system consisting of 3,168 rooftop- and ground-mounted solar panels. In 2017, a severe hail storm hit the greater Denver area and the NREL campus.

Despite hailstones up to 2.75 inches in diameter being reported in the area — and the countless cars and windows that were damaged — only one of the facility’s 3,168 solar panels sustained damage. That’s a major testament to the resilience of solar panel systems.
 

DFSNOLE

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Sep 25, 2002
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Well the homeowners insurance issue in Florida goes beyond this. We currently have one of the highest rates in the country and companies are dropping homeowners left and right so it's fitting that they will find another way to no longer insure Florida homeowners.
I'm so glad our fine governor is focusing on things like the Stop Woke Act and not working to solve the insurance issues! MAGA Light
 

Joes Place

HR King
Aug 28, 2003
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The National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, can attest to the resilience of solar panels against extreme weather. NREL is home to an enormous solar energy system consisting of 3,168 rooftop- and ground-mounted solar panels. In 2017, a severe hail storm hit the greater Denver area and the NREL campus.

Despite hailstones up to 2.75 inches in diameter being reported in the area — and the countless cars and windows that were damaged — only one of the facility’s 3,168 solar panels sustained damage. That’s a major testament to the resilience of solar panel systems.
Yep

I posted this a couple years ago.
 

seminole97

HR Legend
Jun 14, 2005
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I'm so glad our fine governor is focusing on things like the Stop Woke Act and not working to solve the insurance issues! MAGA Light
Like when he called a special session four months ago?
I get that it isn’t as headline grabbing as the Disney stuff, but isn’t ignored.

https://www.gtlaw.com/en/insights/2...egislation-property-insurance-building-safety

On April 26, 2022, Governor Ron DeSantis signed a proclamation calling on the Florida Legislature to convene for a special session in response to Florida’s current property insurance market. The formal call was to consider legislation related to property insurance, reinsurance, changes to the Florida building code to improve affordability of property insurance, the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation, civil remedies, and appropriations. The proclamation called for the special session to convene from May 23 through May 27, but the Legislature was able to complete their work in only three days and adjourned Sine Die on May 25.
 

DFSNOLE

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Like when he called a special session four months ago?
I get that it isn’t as headline grabbing as the Disney stuff, but isn’t ignored.

https://www.gtlaw.com/en/insights/2...egislation-property-insurance-building-safety

On April 26, 2022, Governor Ron DeSantis signed a proclamation calling on the Florida Legislature to convene for a special session in response to Florida’s current property insurance market. The formal call was to consider legislation related to property insurance, reinsurance, changes to the Florida building code to improve affordability of property insurance, the Florida Office of Insurance Regulation, civil remedies, and appropriations. The proclamation called for the special session to convene from May 23 through May 27, but the Legislature was able to complete their work in only three days and adjourned Sine Die on May 25.
And a proclamation came from that session. Woo-hoo!
 
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NoleATL

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Jul 11, 2007
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Well the homeowners insurance issue in Florida goes beyond this. We currently have one of the highest rates in the country and companies are dropping homeowners left and right so it's fitting that they will find another way to no longer insure Florida homeowners.
Much of this stems from those in charge of Florida state government not doing their jobs. They focused on book banning, trans and gays (never mind it's the youth pastors etc who are harming children) when they should have been reforming laws that enable the roof scams etc. They even held a "special session" to allegedly address the insurance crisis but did nothing.
 

NoleATL

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So, why just Florida?
I'll just copy/paste my reply from below that included a large part of the problem. But, you know this already.

"Much of this stems from those in charge of Florida state government not doing their jobs. They focused on book banning, trans and gays (never mind it's the youth pastors etc who are harming children) when they should have been reforming laws that enable the roof scams etc. They even held a "special session" to allegedly address the insurance crisis but did nothing."
 

Uniformed_ReRe

Scout Team
Nov 5, 2011
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From 2005 to 2016, I think Florida had around a decade of no hurricanes. During this time, insurers should have been stashing money. Instead, they were overly reliant on annual reinsurance.

When the hurricanes started hitting again, Florida insurance companies had saved little during the good times and basically wasted a decade.
 

Uniformed_ReRe

Scout Team
Nov 5, 2011
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My insurance company was liquidated a few weeks ago. Now I'm on Citizens, the ObamaCare of Florida homeowners insurance.
 
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Uniformed_ReRe

Scout Team
Nov 5, 2011
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Hurricane risk varies considerably throughout Florida. The risk in North Florida and inland Central Florida is lower than much of the US eastern seaboard.
 

Uniformed_ReRe

Scout Team
Nov 5, 2011
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Speaking of solar panels, Florida is currently being swarmed by clipboard-holding guys in polo shirts selling solar panels door-to-door. It’s become so pervasive that even the local home-invading meth-heads have gotten in on it by imitating them.

Now everyone communicates via Ring doorbells.
 

Uniformed_ReRe

Scout Team
Nov 5, 2011
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I don't have the charts in front of me but personal experience tells me that NW Florida seems to have a bullseye on it.

Yes. The panhandle is often overlooked. Hurricane Michael was the first Cat 5 to hit the Lower 48 since 1992. Most people have never heard of it.
 

seminole97

HR Legend
Jun 14, 2005
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And a proclamation came from that session. Woo-hoo!
No, a proclamation is just the act of the governor that calls for the special session.

You’re going to lengths to show you don’t know what’s going on. I’m kind of surprised, I just assumed you’d have a passing interest in this stuff (I have none and I’d heard about it). You don’t even have an excuse since I gave you the link to read more about it (the link was for phenom, he has trouble googling).

From the link I included above (read more at the link).

At the conclusion of the third day, legislators passed CS/SB 2D, relating to Property Insurance, and SB 4D, relating to Building Safety, both by Senator Boyd. Governor DeSantis signed SB 2D and SB 4D into law May 26. Except as otherwise expressly provided in the bills, they became effective upon the signature of the Governor. This GT Alert provides a breakdown of both pieces of legislation.
 

DFSNOLE

HR Legend
Sep 25, 2002
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No, a proclamation is just the act of the governor that calls for the special session.

You’re going to lengths to show you don’t know what’s going on. I’m kind of surprised, I just assumed you’d have a passing interest in this stuff (I have none and I’d heard about it). You don’t even have an excuse since I gave you the link to read more about it (the link was for phenom, he has trouble googling).

From the link I included above (read more at the link).

At the conclusion of the third day, legislators passed CS/SB 2D, relating to Property Insurance, and SB 4D, relating to Building Safety, both by Senator Boyd. Governor DeSantis signed SB 2D and SB 4D into law May 26. Except as otherwise expressly provided in the bills, they became effective upon the signature of the Governor. This GT Alert provides a breakdown of both pieces of legislation.
And the positive results of this action? More insurance companies leaving the state?
 

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