Texas' abortion laws led to 3-day delay for Houston woman's pregnancy loss treatment, doctor says

Morrison71

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Kristina Cruickshank knew she had lost her unborn baby.

In her 15th week of pregnancy, a large fluid-filled sac surrounded the fetus, most prominently around the head and neck. Massive cysts, some filled with blood, covered her enlarged ovaries in a "spoke wheel pattern," according to her medical records. Additional fluid had filled parts of her abdomen.

The 35-year-old Rosenberg woman was frail, vomiting and in pain when she and her husband, John, arrived at Houston Methodist Sugar Land on Friday, June 3. She needed an abortion. But according to Dr. Lauren Swords, the maternal medical director at the hospital's childbirth center, no one at the hospital was equipped to perform the necessary procedure, known as dilation and evacuation. It also was not clear whether Kristina was exempt from Texas abortion laws, which threaten providers with felonies and lawsuits for performing abortions except to treat a miscarriage or a loosely defined "medical emergency." Her fetus still had a heartbeat, and she did not yet need life-saving care.
 
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Joes Place

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Weeks of delay

Not merely 3 days.

She SHOULD HAVE had preventive care weeks earlier, BEFORE her condition worsened.
 
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lucas80

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Weird, I was told that Dems and non cultist Republicans were being hyperbolic, and there weren't going to be any gray areas. Just happy moms carrying healthy babies to full term, all born into wonderful circumstances and two loving parents.
 
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"no one at the hospital was equipped to perform the necessary procedure, known as dilation and evacuation. It also was not clear whether Kristina was exempt from Texas abortion laws, which threaten providers with felonies and lawsuits for performing abortions except to treat a miscarriage or a loosely defined "medical emergency." Her fetus still had a heartbeat, and she did not yet need life-saving care."




I'm pro abortion for rape victims and terminal pregnancies but if you could quit pissing yourself for 30 seconds you might comprehend this had to do with doctors not the law. Dumbasses.
 

goldmom

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A D&E is also a frequently performed surgical procedure that isn’t associated with an abortion so there’s more to this story.
 

Joes Place

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"no one at the hospital was equipped to perform the necessary procedure, known as dilation and evacuation. It also was not clear whether Kristina was exempt from Texas abortion laws, which threaten providers with felonies and lawsuits for performing abortions except to treat a miscarriage or a loosely defined "medical emergency." Her fetus still had a heartbeat, and she did not yet need life-saving care."




I'm pro abortion for rape victims and terminal pregnancies but if you could quit pissing yourself for 30 seconds you might comprehend this had to do with doctors not the law. Dumbasses.
Nope

Had to do with the laws. Doctor even says so.

"Dumbass"
 

goldmom

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A D&E is NOT incredibly complex. It’s day surgery.
Love how some men know wtf they’re talking about to the extent they can call others a dumbass.
 
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You literally posted it, yourself.

Hospitals are erring on the side of caution to protect their own staff, at the expense of the patients.
Jesus you are dumb. It said they were not sure if it did or if it didn't. It clearly states the delay was no one in the hospital was equipped to do it.
 

Joes Place

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but if you could quit pissing yourself for 30 seconds you might comprehend this had to do with doctors not the law. Dumbasses.


Kristina was diagnosed at 12 weeks with a cystic hygroma - a large fluid-filled sac around the fetus' head and neck. It was so large that she was told the fetus likely would not survive. But because of fetal heartbeat laws, doctors could not offer termination.
 

Joes Place

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Jesus you are dumb. It said they were not sure if it did or if it didn't.

After Kristina was admitted Friday, her medical records show that Texas Children’s initially “declined” a transfer request early Saturday and left subsequent requests “pending” while an ethics committee reviewed the case. Before abortion restrictions tightened last year, a transfer request for similar cases “would not have taken this long,” said Swords, who could not comment on the specific reason why Texas Children’s did not immediately accept the transfer.


Ethics committees HAVE TO review this nonsense now, to ensure their doctors don't get prosecuted under the new laws.

And, as already noted for you: she was DENIED care due to the "heartbeat bill" from 1 yr ago, despite the FACT that fetuses DO NOT HAVE HEARTBEATS.
 
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RNHawk

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Weird, I was told that Dems and non cultist Republicans were being hyperbolic, and there weren't going to be any gray areas. Just happy moms carrying healthy babies to full term, all born into wonderful circumstances and two loving parents.
Can you link that?
 

Joes Place

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You truly are to stupid to even have a conversation with. Educate yourself.

Educate yourself.

By definition, a "heartbeat" is the audible sound made by the heart valves.
This is something fetuses have not yet developed.

They may be called "heartbeat bills"; they are referring to the electrical pacing activity of the S-A node which does form early. However, that is neither a "heart", nor a "heartbeat".
 
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Educate yourself.

By definition, a "heartbeat" is the audible sound made by the heart valves.
This is something fetuses have not yet developed.

They may be called "heartbeat bills"; they are referring to the electrical pacing activity of the S-A node which does form early. However, that is neither a "heart", nor a "heartbeat".
You dumb bastard, you can hear a heartbeat on ultrasound at like 6 weeks. I heard my daughters at like 10. Keep going idiot.
 
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Now, Google up how those sounds are generated

#It'sTheUltrasoundUnitThatCreatesThemYouStupidShit
You think an ultrasound machine "creates" the heartbeat and nor amplifies it..... you truly are ****ing dumb Joe. Wrong in a thread twice and you continue to double down.
 

goldmom

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You are mistaken about the heartbeat.
My son was born in 1977 just prior to ultrasound yet my OB could hear a heartbeat by the second month of gestation. It’s not a fully formed organ but it’s there.
 

Joes Place

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You think an ultrasound machine "creates" the heartbeat and nor amplifies it..... you truly are ****ing dumb Joe. Wrong in a thread twice and you continue to double down.

"When I use a stethoscope to listen to an [adult] patient's heart, the sound that I'm hearing is caused by the opening and closing of the cardiac valves," says Dr. Nisha Verma, an OB-GYN who specializes in abortion care and works at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The sound generated by an ultrasound in very early pregnancy is quite different, she says.

"At six weeks of gestation, those valves don't exist," she explains. "The flickering that we're seeing on the ultrasound that early in the development of the pregnancy is actually electrical activity, and the sound that you 'hear' is actually manufactured by the ultrasound machine."

That's why "the term 'fetal heartbeat' is pretty misleading," says Dr. Jennifer Kerns, an OB-GYN and associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

"What we're really detecting is a grouping of cells that are initiating some electrical activity," she explains. "In no way is this detecting a functional cardiovascular system or a functional heart."

 

Joes Place

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Joe, your ability to consistently double down in order to protect your small ego is pure comedy.


A 15 week old has a heartbeat. Technology makes it audible for us.



Sorry you were born with a small peen bro.
You just informed us you "heard it" at 6 wks and 10 wks

Which is simply not possible, because it does not exist.


Heart chambers do not form until 17-20 weeks. That's the earliest you'd get any actual heart valve sounds.
 
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"When I use a stethoscope to listen to an [adult] patient's heart, the sound that I'm hearing is caused by the opening and closing of the cardiac valves," says Dr. Nisha Verma, an OB-GYN who specializes in abortion care and works at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

The sound generated by an ultrasound in very early pregnancy is quite different, she says.

"At six weeks of gestation, those valves don't exist," she explains. "The flickering that we're seeing on the ultrasound that early in the development of the pregnancy is actually electrical activity, and the sound that you 'hear' is actually manufactured by the ultrasound machine."

That's why "the term 'fetal heartbeat' is pretty misleading," says Dr. Jennifer Kerns, an OB-GYN and associate professor at the University of California, San Francisco.


"What we're really detecting is a grouping of cells that are initiating some electrical activity," she explains. "In no way is this detecting a functional cardiovascular system or a functional heart."

That electrical activity..... is a heartbeat.... dumbass.

There is a major difference between a heartbeat and a functioning cardivs6system.