Veterans can now teach in Florida with no degree. School leaders say it 'lowers the bar'

Tom Paris

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I have a feeling that a lot of vets who accept this challange won't fully appreciate what they are taking on. I once accepted an offer to teach a paralegal class at a community college and was surprised how much time teaching consumed.

Lecture and assignment preparation, grading, and student interaction/counseling was a much bigger time commitment than I expected .....and that was a class of 18 adults at a private institution. I can only imagine the extra time and effort required to manage young kids in a public school setting where in addition to all of the above, you have to also have to deal with parents as well as school administrators.
It’s comical, and sad, that so many think they can very easily do this job. Even my oh so very simple PE job. Lol.
 

tarheelbybirth

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Apr 17, 2003
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More reasons than that for the shortage…

Pay, shitty kids you can’t discipline…..many reasons.
The NC GOP is waging a war on public education. That is quite simply a fact. On their current pay scale, from year 15 to the end of your career - you get one raise at year 25. That’s it. When they do give an across-the-board raise, it is heavily weighted toward new teachers with veteran getting almost nothing. Case in point, this year’s “average” 4+% raise with new hires getting a 7+% bump and those over 25 years barely getting over 2%. They took away the longevity bonus worth thousands of dollars a year that every single state employee gets…except teachers. The new hires are also locked out of the post-retirement benefits I’ll get so they have zero incentive to stay.

Thei goal is to wreck public education and then use the wreckage they created as an excuse to divert more and more public money into private hands.
 

Tom Paris

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Oct 1, 2001
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The NC GOP is waging a war on public education. That is quite simply a fact. On their current pay scale, from year 15 to the end of your career - you get one raise at year 25. That’s it. When they do give an across-the-board raise, it is heavily weighted toward new teachers with veteran getting almost nothing. Case in point, this year’s “average” 4+% raise with new hires getting a 7+% bump and those over 25 years barely getting over 2%. They took away the longevity bonus worth thousands of dollars a year that every single state employee gets…except teachers. The new hires are also locked out of the post-retirement benefits I’ll get so they have zero incentive to stay.

Thei goal is to wreck public education and then use the wreckage they created as an excuse to divert more and more public money into private hands.
I’d really like to know if that’s precisely the endgame here…to move even more public funds to wealthy white people.
 
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theiacowtipper

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The veterans are not taking jobs away from traditional teachers. The story says no veteran has even applied for the program since the law was passed. But let's act like the sky is falling anyway....
Please feel free to make things up that I haven’t said. I don’t begrudge veterans the jobs. I’d just act that they be as qualified as anyone else who is eligible for that job.
 

nu2u

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It’s comical, and sad, that so many think they can very easily do this job. Even my oh so very simple PE job. Lol.
Based on my experience, the saying "walk a mile in their shoes" is especially applicable to teaching. A large segment of the general public have a superficial understanding of what the job actually entails. Two of my sisters were teachers so I had an informed idea of the responsibilites. But more than anything else, it was the time commitment that really surprised me.
 
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LuteHawk

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Nov 30, 2011
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My daughter graduated from a suburban high school
in Illinois. She had honors classes and was taught by
teachers who had their masters degree and her English
teacher and Biology teacher had a Ph. D.

Her high school teachers had the gift of teaching in
addition to their academic credentials. It is most
important that teachers actually enjoy their career
and make learning for the students a joy as well.
 

Keehawk

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May 24, 2011
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I doubt that.

No. It would be stupid.
flat-750x1000-075-f-u1.jpg
 

nu2u

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I fail to see how being forced to read Homer and write book reports makes one a good teacher. Especially if that teacher isn't going to be teaching literature.
"Fail to see". You have (perhaps inadvertently) placed your finger on the problem. I am not faulting your "failure to see" one bit. I recommend that you try teaching for one year, or even one semester, then report back about your experience.
 

The Tradition

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Apr 23, 2002
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"Fail to see". You have (perhaps inadvertently) placed your finger on the problem. I am not faulting your "failure to see" one bit. I recommend that you try teaching for one year, or even one semester, then report back about your experience.

And college prepares them for that? I'd think combat experience would be more useful.
 

ConvenientParking

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I think you will find that most normal and well adjusted veterans will be a hard pass on this opportunity.

That's an interesting hypothetical question for a veteran. "In which place do you believe it is easier to spread democracy and freedom and respect for rule of law? Rural Afghanistan or suburban Chicago 7th grade class?"
 
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The Tradition

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Back to my question from earlier. If qualifications aren’t relevant, why not open this program up to anyone to help solve the teacher shortage? What special qualifications warrant limiting this to veterans?

Oh, I dunno... I would think someone who worked as an accountant could certainly teach accounting in a high school.

Life experiences should count.
 

ConvenientParking

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Oh, I dunno... I would think someone who worked as an accountant could certainly teach accounting in a high school.

Life experiences should count.

Not knowing anything accounting, I would think someone who worked as an accountant would probably have to take high school accounting again to relearn the dumbed down and stripped-of-all-context version that is taught to HS students. Then they'd also have to learn how to teach it to people unfamiliar with the subject and who likely don't have their same aptitude for the subject.
 
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srams21

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And here's another thing... there are a LOT of people in the military whose job it is to be INSTRUCTORS.

Why WOULDN'T such people be qualified to be public school teachers?
I'm fine with it if their military experience involves instruction or teaching in an extended manner (meaning it was a main part of their job). But having the dude who cooks in the mess hall teach ... hell no.
 

Keehawk

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Respectfully, why do you bother with this place? I’ve noticed that very rarely do you participate in the discussion other than to say stuff like “Yeah, if this was the Ds/libs/left doing this…”

What do you get out of HORT?
A fair question that I will answer with a question and an answer.

What am I supposed to get from hort? I get entertainment.