World's first malaria vaccine, Mosquirix, approved by W.H.O.; expected to save tens of thousands of children in Africa per year.

Morrison71

HR Legend
Nov 10, 2006
15,543
12,346
113
The World Health Organization on Wednesday endorsed the first ever vaccine to prevent malaria, debuting a tool that could save the lives of tens of thousands of children in Africa each year.

Malaria is among the oldest known and deadliest of infectious diseases. It kills about half a million people each year, nearly all of them in sub-Saharan Africa — among them 260,000 children under age 5.

The new vaccine, made by GlaxoSmithKline, rouses a child's immune system to thwart Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest of five malaria pathogens and the most prevalent in Africa. The vaccine is not just a first for malaria — it is the first developed for any parasitic disease.
Click to shrink...
A modeling study last year estimated that if the vaccine were rolled out to countries with the highest incidence of malaria, it could prevent 5.4 million cases and 23,000 deaths in children younger than age 5 each year.

And a recent trial of the vaccine in combination with preventive drugs given to children during high-transmission seasons found that the dual approach was much more effective at preventing severe disease, hospitalization and death than either method alone.

To have a malaria vaccine that is safe, moderately effective and ready for distribution is "a historical event," said Dr. Pedro Alonso, director of the W.H.O.'s global malaria program.
Click to shrink...
Called Mosquirix, the new vaccine is given in three doses between ages 5 and 17 months, and a fourth dose roughly 18 months later. Following the clinical trials, the vaccine was tried out in three countries — Kenya, Malawi and Ghana — where it was incorporated into routine immunization programs.

More than 2.3 million doses have been administered in those countries, reaching more than 800,000 children. That bumped up the percentage of children protected against malaria in some way to more than 90 percent from less than 70 percent, Dr. Hamel said.

"The ability to reduce inequities in access to malaria prevention — that's important," Dr. Hamel said. "It was impressive to see that this could reach children who are currently not being protected."
Click to shrink...
 

unIowa

HR Legend
Gold Member
Dec 30, 2008
44,414
29,195
113
Glaxo: The vaccine's effectiveness at preventing severe cases of malaria in children is only around 30%, but it is the only approved vaccine.

There is a better one that should only be a year or so away:

University of Oxford-Novavax Malaria Vaccine Demonstrates 77% Efficacy in Children​

 
  • Like
Reactions: Joes Place

FAUlty Gator

HR Legend
Oct 27, 2017
30,528
34,873
113
How long before we see thousands of African Children in MAGA hats screaming at school principals about vaccines...and for serving sand instead of sandwiches at lunch.