Y'all are going to be stuck with me here for a loooooong time....

The Tradition

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Apr 23, 2002
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Adding a spoonful of sugar to a cup of coffee could be the key to a longer life, according to a new study. Scientists have found coffee-drinkers are at a lower risk of death than non-coffee drinkers, but those who like the drink sweet are even less likely to die.

Researchers in China who followed a group of British adults for an average of seven years found people who drank between one and a half to three and a half cups of caffeinated coffee were less likely to die during that time in comparison to those who did not take sugar or those who do did drink coffee at all.

People who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were up to 21 percent less likely to die than those who did not drink coffee.

Those who like their coffee sweet were up to 31 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers during the follow-up period — if they kept their coffee consumption between one and a half and three and a half cups a day. Adults who took sugar only added one spoonful on average.

Drinking coffee displayed a connection to a lower risk of dying from any cause, dying from cancer, and dying from heart disease. It didn’t matter whether people drank decaffeinated, instant, or ground coffee — the results held up for all of them.

What about artificial sweeteners?

The team notes that their results were inconclusive for participants adding artificial sweeteners to their coffee. Earlier research has shown the beverage puts coffee-drinkers at a lower risk of dying, but those studies did not distinguish between sweetened and unsweetened coffee.

During the new study, researchers looked at data on more than 171,000 adults participating in the UK Biobank study health behavior questionnaire. The healthy volunteers, who did not have a known case of heart disease or cancer, answered dietary and health questions to determine the effect of their coffee-drinking habits. Scientists followed up with each person from 2009 to 2018.

While the results, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, adjusted for each person’s lifestyle, demographics, and clinical factors, they do not prove drinking coffee is the only reason participants were less likely to die.

 

THE_DEVIL

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sutton-foster-thanks-for-the-warning.gif
 

notlongago

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Jul 28, 2012
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Are the details published anywhere?
This flies in the face in the face of logic and science.
 

Hondo_11

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Mar 15, 2022
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Adding a spoonful of sugar to a cup of coffee could be the key to a longer life, according to a new study. Scientists have found coffee-drinkers are at a lower risk of death than non-coffee drinkers, but those who like the drink sweet are even less likely to die.

Researchers in China who followed a group of British adults for an average of seven years found people who drank between one and a half to three and a half cups of caffeinated coffee were less likely to die during that time in comparison to those who did not take sugar or those who do did drink coffee at all.

People who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were up to 21 percent less likely to die than those who did not drink coffee.

Those who like their coffee sweet were up to 31 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers during the follow-up period — if they kept their coffee consumption between one and a half and three and a half cups a day. Adults who took sugar only added one spoonful on average.

Drinking coffee displayed a connection to a lower risk of dying from any cause, dying from cancer, and dying from heart disease. It didn’t matter whether people drank decaffeinated, instant, or ground coffee — the results held up for all of them.

What about artificial sweeteners?

The team notes that their results were inconclusive for participants adding artificial sweeteners to their coffee. Earlier research has shown the beverage puts coffee-drinkers at a lower risk of dying, but those studies did not distinguish between sweetened and unsweetened coffee.

During the new study, researchers looked at data on more than 171,000 adults participating in the UK Biobank study health behavior questionnaire. The healthy volunteers, who did not have a known case of heart disease or cancer, answered dietary and health questions to determine the effect of their coffee-drinking habits. Scientists followed up with each person from 2009 to 2018.

While the results, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, adjusted for each person’s lifestyle, demographics, and clinical factors, they do not prove drinking coffee is the only reason participants were less likely to die.

You're too far right to last here very long!
 

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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Adding a spoonful of sugar to a cup of coffee could be the key to a longer life, according to a new study. Scientists have found coffee-drinkers are at a lower risk of death than non-coffee drinkers, but those who like the drink sweet are even less likely to die.

Researchers in China who followed a group of British adults for an average of seven years found people who drank between one and a half to three and a half cups of caffeinated coffee were less likely to die during that time in comparison to those who did not take sugar or those who do did drink coffee at all.

People who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were up to 21 percent less likely to die than those who did not drink coffee.

Those who like their coffee sweet were up to 31 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers during the follow-up period — if they kept their coffee consumption between one and a half and three and a half cups a day. Adults who took sugar only added one spoonful on average.

Drinking coffee displayed a connection to a lower risk of dying from any cause, dying from cancer, and dying from heart disease. It didn’t matter whether people drank decaffeinated, instant, or ground coffee — the results held up for all of them.

What about artificial sweeteners?

The team notes that their results were inconclusive for participants adding artificial sweeteners to their coffee. Earlier research has shown the beverage puts coffee-drinkers at a lower risk of dying, but those studies did not distinguish between sweetened and unsweetened coffee.

During the new study, researchers looked at data on more than 171,000 adults participating in the UK Biobank study health behavior questionnaire. The healthy volunteers, who did not have a known case of heart disease or cancer, answered dietary and health questions to determine the effect of their coffee-drinking habits. Scientists followed up with each person from 2009 to 2018.

While the results, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, adjusted for each person’s lifestyle, demographics, and clinical factors, they do not prove drinking coffee is the only reason participants were less likely to die.

My father, who lived to a ripe old age, was an absolute world class coffee drinker. Always 2 creams + 2 sugars. He'd have a cup with breakfast, a cup when he got to work, probably another in the day, a cup or two with dinner, and then...

When I was maybe junior high age, several times a week at about 830 at night, he'd ask if I wanted to go to the coffee shop with him. I'd get a plate of fries or maybe a brownie sundae. he'd get a pot of coffee and we'd shoot the shit with the other customers (one was a Pitt alum/fan). Then we'd go home, and he'd go to bed and sleep like a baby. Rinse and repeat.
 
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Wendy79

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Jun 3, 2002
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My father, who lived to a ripe old age, was an absolute world class coffee drinker. Always 2 creams + 2 sugars. He'd have a cup with breakfast, a cup when he got to work, probably another in the day, a cup or two with dinner, and then...

When I was maybe junior high age, several times a week at about 830 at night, he'd ask if I wanted to go to the coffee shop with him. I'd get a plate of fries or maybe a brownie sundae. he'd get a pot of coffee and we'd shoot the shit with the other customers (one was a Pitt alum/fan). Then we'd go home, and he'd go to bed and sleep like a baby. Rinse and repeat.

Did your dad have ADHD?
 

jamesvanderwulf

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Nov 27, 2015
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People's Republic of Johnson County
I’ve watched my dad drink 6 cups a day with 2 tsp of sugar and that crappy powdered creamer and if there’s butter on the table a glob of that too! WW II vet who will turn 95 next year. He’s on the riding lawn mover right now and will drive 20 miles to visit his girlfriend in the nursing home after lunch. He smoked 2 packs a day from 17 - 65 too. @The Tradition may live to 100…
 

ConvenientParking

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No, he was as mellow and gentle a person as you could imagine. Seriously, it was like he was completely immune to the effects of caffeine.

I believe it. Met a lot of dudes in AA like this, but mainly the ones with decades of sobriety. Takes time to build this tolerance/immunity/dependence.
 

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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I’ve watched my dad drink 6 cups a day with 2 tsp of sugar and that crappy powdered creamer and if there’s butter on the table a glob of that too! WW II vet who will turn 95 next year. He’s on the riding lawn mover right now and will drive 20 miles to visit his girlfriend in the nursing home after lunch. He smoked 2 packs a day from 17 - 65 too. @The Tradition may live to 100…
Re your sig line (though maybe not the century you're referring to):

My great uncle was in baseball for about 50 years. Many years ago on the way back from a work trip I decided to pay him a visit in Denver (where he'd retired). As it happened, there was a Rockies game that day, and to be preceded by an old-timers game to boot. So we go to Mile High stadium (he was a regular) early while the old guys are taking BP, and my uncle just opens the gate and we walk out onto the field and start visiting with guys. Suddenly I hear a voice call out to him from right field, and it's Lou Brock, who he'd brought up to the bigs with the Cubs. As we're talking to Lou, a BP ball came out, Charlie picks it up and has him sign it, and tells me to hold on to it. Eventually we start making our way back across the field and he tells me to give him the ball. So, we walk up to Enos "Country" Slaughter, and Charlie has him sign the ball. Again, he tells me to hold on to it. After chatting a bit, we again head towards our seats, and he tells me to give him the ball. "Mr. Gibson," he says, "would you sign this for my nephew?" "Sure Charlie," he replied. But there was no chit chat with Mr. Gibson. (Only other baseball guy I ever heard him refer to as "Mister" was Connie Mack; not even his one-time boss Ewing Kauffman.) So in the course of ten minutes, we got three Cardinal hall of famer autographs on an infield practice ball. :)
 

THE_DEVIL

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Re your sig line (though maybe not the century you're referring to):

My great uncle was in baseball for about 50 years. Many years ago on the way back from a work trip I decided to pay him a visit in Denver (where he'd retired). As it happened, there was a Rockies game that day, and to be preceded by an old-timers game to boot. So we go to Mile High stadium (he was a regular) early while the old guys are taking BP, and my uncle just opens the gate and we walk out onto the field and start visiting with guys. Suddenly I hear a voice call out to him from right field, and it's Lou Brock, who he'd brought up to the bigs with the Cubs. As we're talking to Lou, a BP ball came out, Charlie picks it up and has him sign it, and tells me to hold on to it. Eventually we start making our way back across the field and he tells me to give him the ball. So, we walk up to Enos "Country" Slaughter, and Charlie has him sign the ball. Again, he tells me to hold on to it. After chatting a bit, we again head towards our seats, and he tells me to give him the ball. "Mr. Gibson," he says, "would you sign this for my nephew?" "Sure Charlie," he replied. But there was no chit chat with Mr. Gibson. (Only other baseball guy I ever heard him refer to as "Mister" was Connie Mack; not even his one-time boss Ewing Kauffman.) So in the course of ten minutes, we got three Cardinal hall of famer autographs on an infield practice ball. :)
Ok You win HROT for the day.
 
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Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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Ok You win HROT for the day.
given that you are bestowing it, i have to ask if there are any strings attached....

Charlie was a helluva guy. Having grown up in the mines, the only thing he cared about was whether a guy could play baseball. Claimed to have been the first scout not to list players race on scouting reports. Had a great story about getting thrown in jail in (i think) TN when they got in late and he beat up a hotel clerk who wouldn't accommodate his AA players (and was so pissed about it that he took them to breakfast at a segregated restaurant the next morning when he was bailed out). Always said his biggest regret in his baseball career was that when he got thrown out of a game, he didn't designate Buck O'Neil to be the on-field manager (which would have made him the first AA), because the owner told him he'd fire him if he did.
 
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VodkaSam

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I drink almost a full pot of coffee every AM. My wife has one cup, I have the rest. Always drank it black until a couple months ago when I tried a little of her Nestle‘ coconut crème liquid creamer.

Hear’s to hoping the sugar and additional calories in the creamer adds 10 years to my life….but I really doubt it.
 

Chewback

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Feb 14, 2002
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Adding a spoonful of sugar to a cup of coffee could be the key to a longer life, according to a new study. Scientists have found coffee-drinkers are at a lower risk of death than non-coffee drinkers, but those who like the drink sweet are even less likely to die.

Researchers in China who followed a group of British adults for an average of seven years found people who drank between one and a half to three and a half cups of caffeinated coffee were less likely to die during that time in comparison to those who did not take sugar or those who do did drink coffee at all.

People who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were up to 21 percent less likely to die than those who did not drink coffee.

Those who like their coffee sweet were up to 31 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers during the follow-up period — if they kept their coffee consumption between one and a half and three and a half cups a day. Adults who took sugar only added one spoonful on average.

Drinking coffee displayed a connection to a lower risk of dying from any cause, dying from cancer, and dying from heart disease. It didn’t matter whether people drank decaffeinated, instant, or ground coffee — the results held up for all of them.

What about artificial sweeteners?

The team notes that their results were inconclusive for participants adding artificial sweeteners to their coffee. Earlier research has shown the beverage puts coffee-drinkers at a lower risk of dying, but those studies did not distinguish between sweetened and unsweetened coffee.

During the new study, researchers looked at data on more than 171,000 adults participating in the UK Biobank study health behavior questionnaire. The healthy volunteers, who did not have a known case of heart disease or cancer, answered dietary and health questions to determine the effect of their coffee-drinking habits. Scientists followed up with each person from 2009 to 2018.

While the results, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, adjusted for each person’s lifestyle, demographics, and clinical factors, they do not prove drinking coffee is the only reason participants were less likely to die.

Ah well, maybe we'll get lucky and a hurricane will finally get your ass.
 

Wendy79

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Jun 3, 2002
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No, he was as mellow and gentle a person as you could imagine. Seriously, it was like he was completely immune to the effects of caffeine.

Doesn't mean he didn't have it.

Many with ADHD find caffeine calms them down. A friend had severe ADHD, and after her mom died she'd drink 5 or 6 cups of coffee before bed just to fall asleep.
 
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Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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Doesn't mean he didn't have it.

Many with ADHD find caffeine calms them down. A friend had severe ADHD, and after her mom died she'd drink 5 or 6 cups of coffee before bed just to fall asleep.
To be clear, He didn’t have it.
 

hawksurprize

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Oct 1, 2001
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Adding a spoonful of sugar to a cup of coffee could be the key to a longer life, according to a new study. Scientists have found coffee-drinkers are at a lower risk of death than non-coffee drinkers, but those who like the drink sweet are even less likely to die.

Researchers in China who followed a group of British adults for an average of seven years found people who drank between one and a half to three and a half cups of caffeinated coffee were less likely to die during that time in comparison to those who did not take sugar or those who do did drink coffee at all.

People who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were up to 21 percent less likely to die than those who did not drink coffee.

Those who like their coffee sweet were up to 31 percent less likely to die than non-coffee drinkers during the follow-up period — if they kept their coffee consumption between one and a half and three and a half cups a day. Adults who took sugar only added one spoonful on average.

Drinking coffee displayed a connection to a lower risk of dying from any cause, dying from cancer, and dying from heart disease. It didn’t matter whether people drank decaffeinated, instant, or ground coffee — the results held up for all of them.

What about artificial sweeteners?

The team notes that their results were inconclusive for participants adding artificial sweeteners to their coffee. Earlier research has shown the beverage puts coffee-drinkers at a lower risk of dying, but those studies did not distinguish between sweetened and unsweetened coffee.

During the new study, researchers looked at data on more than 171,000 adults participating in the UK Biobank study health behavior questionnaire. The healthy volunteers, who did not have a known case of heart disease or cancer, answered dietary and health questions to determine the effect of their coffee-drinking habits. Scientists followed up with each person from 2009 to 2018.

While the results, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, adjusted for each person’s lifestyle, demographics, and clinical factors, they do not prove drinking coffee is the only reason participants were less likely to die.

ya, ex wife loved sugar in her coffee and died at 49.,but i guess you've already beat that, Congrats.
 

PoopandBoogers

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Mar 29, 2002
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given that you are bestowing it, i have to ask if there are any strings attached....

Charlie was a helluva guy. Having grown up in the mines, the only thing he cared about was whether a guy could play baseball. Claimed to have been the first scout not to list players race on scouting reports. Had a great story about getting thrown in jail in (i think) TN when they got in late and he beat up a hotel clerk who wouldn't accommodate his AA players (and was so pissed about it that he took them to breakfast at a segregated restaurant the next morning when he was bailed out). Always said his biggest regret in his baseball career was that when he got thrown out of a game, he didn't designate Buck O'Neil to be the on-field manager (which would have made him the first AA), because the owner told him he'd fire him if he did.
Moar Uncle Charlie Stories please.
 

Aardvark86

HR MVP
Jan 23, 2018
2,276
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Moar Uncle Charlie Stories please.
Charlie actually played briefly for the great Connie Mack early in his career. Once, late in the game, Mack called on him to pinch hit. “Hit one out of here son,” he said. Charlie, being young and cocky, said, “which seat, mr. Mack?” He then proceeded to look at three strikes without swinging. As he was returning to the dugout, Mack was dusting off a seat on the bench with his scorecard, and as Charlie approached, said “this one right here son”.

i can go on but lmk if I’m wearing out my welcome.
 
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GOHOX69

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Sep 26, 2009
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Coffee is good to ward off cancer and is a nootropic. Great coffee is like great sex. Simply the tits.