The verdict after three weeks back in the office

Tenacious E

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Respectfully, this is the point exactly. What the old world order sees as "missing out on a lot by not coming" the new world order sees as "gaining alot by not coming in." They do the work, help the company advance, etc more efficiently but shed the unnecessary elements of office small talk, gossip, hobnobbing, three bosses strolling to their cube asking for the same thing, etc. People want to maximize time on personal relationships with people they choose to be with, not people they're forced to sit by in the office.
I take days at home on occasion to bang out written work product, prepare for something, etc. And, during covid when we were shut down physically for awhile we made it work. And to never physically be present might work for some mega firm that churns and burns associates, who plan on the majority of associates moving on after a few years. But for smaller firms which actually anticipate their associates becoming partners someday, it is suboptimal, at best.
 

Tenacious E

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This..... I'm a soon to be retired partner and the young associates are going to be the ones hurt by not being in the office. We trained the upper management team very well and now they are at home not passing on that knowledge to the new associates.

The new associates are not going to be in client meetings, overhear phone conversations partners have with clients/how to handle various matters. They won't sufficiently be trained remotely. They will have less delegated tasks. Why would I write a 10 minute email with instructions if I could swing by your office and tell you what to do in 1 minute. May as well do myself so reverse delegation is happening.

EO insurance is going to increase as more mistakes/claims will be made from engineering, law, finance, etc. I think flexibility is fine but should still be in the office a few days per week to keep culture/training.
You and I are in violent agreement.
 
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They are not. Our associates never come to the office. I understand that the department they work in they get very discrete assignments and don’t have to to manage an entire case, but they are missing out on a lot by not coming in
I would think the enterprising associates would take advantage of their colleagues who don’t want to come to the office. You could really make yourself stand out and build some great relationships.
 
Respectfully, this is the point exactly. What the old world order sees as "missing out on a lot by not coming" the new world order sees as "gaining alot by not coming in." They do the work, help the company advance, etc more efficiently but shed the unnecessary elements of office small talk, gossip, hobnobbing, three bosses strolling to their cube asking for the same thing, etc. People want to maximize time on personal relationships with people they choose to be with, not people they're forced to sit by in the office.
What I think people miss out on is that human beings actually learn a lot and build affinity and trust with each other by engaging in those activities you dismiss as “hobnobbing and gossiping and talking.”

Humans are social creatures and there is a lot of soft HR value gained by having work teams interact in person.

Each employee being an island unto themselves and cutting out any and all extraneous socializing may be an introverts dream, but it is hugely off-putting to more outgoing, extroverted individuals.
 

dgordo

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I don’t work in a law firm but our associates participate in client meetings via teams. None of our clients want to meet in person with the exception of the occasional dinner which the associates do attend in person.
 

Tenacious E

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This..... I'm a soon to be retired partner and the young associates are going to be the ones hurt by not being in the office. We trained the upper management team very well and now they are at home not passing on that knowledge to the new associates.

The new associates are not going to be in client meetings, overhear phone conversations partners have with clients/how to handle various matters. They won't sufficiently be trained remotely. They will have less delegated tasks. Why would I write a 10 minute email with instructions if I could swing by your office and tell you what to do in 1 minute. May as well do myself so reverse delegation is happening.

EO insurance is going to increase as more mistakes/claims will be made from engineering, law, finance, etc. I think flexibility is fine but should still be in the office a few days per week to keep culture/training.
I would also stress the part about just sitting in on meetings and overhearing phone conversations. There is a lot of passive learning/osmosis that can't be replicated at home.
 

Rudolph

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Oct 18, 2001
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Where were you commuting from?
Sunset Park to midtown for the first year. Train in just long enough to settle in and read or sketch or listen to a podcast or just sit and contemplate — far enough down the line that getting a seat wasn’t a concern.

Last 8 years was Jersey City, Paulus Hook. Bike to ferry or Path, then ride up to Midtown from Battery Park. Stop at Joe Coffee on Waverly and have coffee (many mornings) with Philip Seymour Hoffman.

That daily ride to/from office was sanity-sustaining.
 
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Capital1Hawk

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Jan 23, 2007
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I don’t work in a law firm but our associates participate in client meetings via teams. None of our clients want to meet in person with the exception of the occasional dinner which the associates do attend in person.
Where are you located?

This is not the case for me in the midwest. Our clients want to meet in person. Less than 10% want to meet via teams or zoom. They operate their businesses in person and want their advisors to also meet in person. All of our clients are relationship based and with that it's more personal in person than over a screen. Also if your associates aren't in front of their clients I guarantee you their competitors are......
 

Fijimn

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May 7, 2008
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Respectfully, this is the point exactly. What the old world order sees as "missing out on a lot by not coming" the new world order sees as "gaining alot by not coming in." They do the work, help the company advance, etc more efficiently but shed the unnecessary elements of office small talk, gossip, hobnobbing, three bosses strolling to their cube asking for the same thing, etc. People want to maximize time on personal relationships with people they choose to be with, not people they're forced to sit by in the office.
I understand your point. But in a law firm setting, there usually isn’t a lot of wasted nonbillable time. When you have to account for every 6 minutes, you tend to stay on task. But bigger picture there are some many nuances and difficulties that arise during the lifespan of a case that missing out on the one-on-one mentoring is IMO an huge for firms dealing with WFH
 
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Fijimn

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Sunset Park to midtown for the first year. Train in just long enough to settle in and read or sketch or listen to a podcast or just sit and contemplate — far enough down the line that getting a seat wasn’t a concern.

Last 8 years was Jersey City, Paulus Hook. Bike to ferry or Path, then ride up to Midtown from Battery Park. Stop at Joe Coffee on Waverly and have coffee (many mornings) with Philip Seymour Hoffman.

That daily ride to/from office was sanity-sustaining.
I was reading Food and Wine and it had Jersey City as the next big foodie city.
 
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dgordo

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Where are you located?

This is not the case for me in the midwest. Our clients want to meet in person. Less than 10% want to meet via teams or zoom. They operate their businesses in person and want their advisors to also meet in person. All of our clients are relationship based and with that it's more personal in person than over a screen. Also if your associates aren't in front of their clients I guarantee you their competitors are......

chicago. we are investment consultants. most of our clients are family offices, endowments and foundations that arent in the office at all.
 

23 so far

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Mar 24, 2016
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Sorry,.. not buying the productivity claims that everyone throws out there.
Agreed 100%. It's far more productive when your "team" is in the same building, and I find it increasingly difficult to get work matters completed for a large customer of ours whose workforce has been largely work from home the last couple of years (answers that I need to complete THEIR projects in a timely manner). They are transitioning back into the office, and I have little doubt it will improve how quickly things get done.

They are out traveling more now and when they visit us I tell them just that. Some people just flat out need "encouragement" to get their shit together, and that's easier done when you have someone nearby who can do just that or have you replaced by someone who doesn't need to be babysat to accomplish the task you're paid to do.

Aside from the fact the youngsters who are just entering the workforce (these are all 4 year degree folks), you need the veterans in close proximity to help you find your way in whatever field you're in. IMO it's a no-brainer.
 
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CLUB215

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Agreed 100%. It's far more productive when your "team" is in the same building, and I find it increasingly difficult to get work matters completed for a large customer of ours whose workforce has been largely work from home the last couple of years (answers that I need to complete THEIR projects in a timely manner). They are transitioning back into the office, and I have little doubt it will improve how quickly things get done.

They are out traveling more now and when they visit us I tell them just that. Some people just flat out need "encouragement" to get their shit together, and that's easier done when you have someone nearby who can do just that or have you replaced by someone who doesn't need to be babysat to accomplish the task you're paid to do.
Sounds like you're paying below market wages and can only attract the poor performers
 

SI_NYC

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Dec 15, 2001
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Sunset Park to midtown for the first year. Train in just long enough to settle in and read or sketch or listen to a podcast or just sit and contemplate — far enough down the line that getting a seat wasn’t a concern.

Last 8 years was Jersey City, Paulus Hook. Bike to ferry or Path, then ride up to Midtown from Battery Park. Stop at Joe Coffee on Waverly and have coffee (many mornings) with Philip Seymour Hoffman.

That daily ride to/from office was sanity-sustaining.
I assume you rode up the Westside Highway. When I rode for my commute to SOHO from Carroll Gardens, I'd ride across the Brooklyn Bridge, cut across to the Westside Highway and up to SOHO. I loved it. When I moved out to NJ (I think you said you dated a girl from the town I live in now) I really missed my daily commute on my bike. What I missed most was in part the feeling of being alive/excitement of surviving riding the streets of NY and another part of just the daily exercise of that ride every morning and night. My favorite bike ride was my weekend ride where I'd ride up the Westside Highway up to the GW bridge and over to Palisades Park.
 
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23 so far

HR Heisman
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Sounds like you're paying below market wages and can only attract the poor performers
If you went into work more often, you may be able to find someone who has their shit together to explain reading comprehension to you.

Good luck, it's extremely apparent you need it.
 

General Tso

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Nov 20, 2004
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Agreed 100%. It's far more productive when your "team" is in the same building, and I find it increasingly difficult to get work matters completed for a large customer of ours whose workforce has been largely work from home the last couple of years (answers that I need to complete THEIR projects in a timely manner). They are transitioning back into the office, and I have little doubt it will improve how quickly things get done.

They are out traveling more now and when they visit us I tell them just that. Some people just flat out need "encouragement" to get their shit together, and that's easier done when you have someone nearby who can do just that or have you replaced by someone who doesn't need to be babysat to accomplish the task you're paid to do.

Aside from the fact the youngsters who are just entering the workforce (these are all 4 year degree folks), you need the veterans in close proximity to help you find your way in whatever field you're in. IMO it's a no-brainer.
 

SoDakHawk

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My law firm tracks key card swipes. Since encouraging return, partners show up. Associates don’t.
Is this a law firm or a blue collar prison where you get home released for the evening but need to be back in your cells, errr, office by 8AM the next day? F that.

I am seeing the shift in mentality over the decades and totally support it. The movie Office Space in the 90's nailed it, going to work was like going to prison. Office buildings were the new factory where worker drones punched in, were chained to their desks, then were allowed to punch out at the end of the day. Basically, like a prison. It's not that people don't want to work it's that they don't want to be treated like prisoners anymore.

The one good thing that came out of the pandemic is that it opened many people in this country's eyes up to what life really should be about, freedom, and not being locked in a cube for 8 hours a day/5 days a week.
 

SoDakHawk

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Uh oh another green new deal guy!!
I'm pretty conservative, but I am also practical and a businessman. There are some aspects of the Green New Deal that make sense and are goals we should strive for, there are others that I think are lunacy, and as always the key is in the implementation.

I believe we can transition from a fossil fuel based energy system to a green energy system but it can't be forced by strangling fossil fuel energy producers. All that does is raise energy prices and hurt the lower and middle classes. Hell, I see our dependence on foreign oil (energy) as a national security issue. How awesome would it be if we could tell them in the Middle East to F off, we don't need you?

This country is large enough that we can be self-sufficient in energy production, manufacturing, everything. We should be importing very little. If we produced everything we need at home and are completely self-sustaining all Americans would be better off for it.
 
The movie Office Space in the 90's nailed it, going to work was like going to prison. Office buildings were the new factory where worker drones punched in, were chained to their desks, then were allowed to punch out at the end of the day.
I mean, other than being paid to do it and it being 100% voluntarily without requiring you to be in a cage or wear a uniform or eat prison food or get anally raped, sure -- pretty much identical. :rolleyes:
 

mattymoknows

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Apr 12, 2007
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Norwalk. IA
Is this a law firm or a blue collar prison where you get home released for the evening but need to be back in your cells, errr, office by 8AM the next day? F that.

I am seeing the shift in mentality over the decades and totally support it. The movie Office Space in the 90's nailed it, going to work was like going to prison. Office buildings were the new factory where worker drones punched in, were chained to their desks, then were allowed to punch out at the end of the day. Basically, like a prison. It's not that people don't want to work it's that they don't want to be treated like prisoners anymore.

The one good thing that came out of the pandemic is that it opened many people in this country's eyes up to what life really should be about, freedom, and not being locked in a cube for 8 hours a day/5 days a week.
Agreed, I get that we all have to work to survive but good God at this point in my life I'm so over feeling like a Serf to the Corporate World. I think I've just been beaten down after years of companies seemingly using me as just another cog in their machines.
I'm not asking for much but WFH a few days a week is a beautiful thing.
 

SoDakHawk

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Sep 14, 2006
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This..... I'm a soon to be retired partner and the young associates are going to be the ones hurt by not being in the office. We trained the upper management team very well and now they are at home not passing on that knowledge to the new associates.

The new associates are not going to be in client meetings, overhear phone conversations partners have with clients/how to handle various matters. They won't sufficiently be trained remotely. They will have less delegated tasks. Why would I write a 10 minute email with instructions if I could swing by your office and tell you what to do in 1 minute. May as well do myself so reverse delegation is happening.

EO insurance is going to increase as more mistakes/claims will be made from engineering, law, finance, etc. I think flexibility is fine but should still be in the office a few days per week to keep culture/training.
Or you could click a button on your computer and have that 1 minute convo...

You do know there is a software program called Teams. It's pretty awesome. All you have to do is click a button and you can IM chat with anybody in your organization. Click another button and you can talk to each other, see each other, share your screen with a colleague, collaborate and work on projects together in any group size you choose. You can sit in on client calls if you want. It is literally like you are sitting at a desk together and sharing a computer.

You can't train or pass on knowledge to new and younger associates using those tools. That's your own problem.
 

SoDakHawk

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Sep 14, 2006
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What I think people miss out on is that human beings actually learn a lot and build affinity and trust with each other by engaging in those activities you dismiss as “hobnobbing and gossiping and talking.”

Humans are social creatures and there is a lot of soft HR value gained by having work teams interact in person.

Each employee being an island unto themselves and cutting out any and all extraneous socializing may be an introverts dream, but it is hugely off-putting to more outgoing, extroverted individuals.
And I don't disagree with what you are saying here. In the end every company and individual needs to make their own decisions about their corporate culture. Personally, I think flexibility is going to be the key to successful companies/firms.
 

paednoch23

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Oct 23, 2009
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The chit-chat and nonsense has seriously cut into productivity. I have co-workers that got more work done in the first 3 hours of the day than they do at the office. Our work commuters were logging into their home workstations an average of 20 minutes before their office hours when at home. That log-in time has moved to 15 minutes after arrival for the start of the workday. Additionally, folks shut down, pack up and leave immediately to the minute of quitting time. WFH folks were still at their workstations on average 10-15 minutes after their day was to end. People are more inclined to eat lunch while in work status at home. Now people are leaving the office for lunch hour. WFH is also environmentally unfriendly. 90% of our office spends 35 minutes one way to and from the office each day.
 
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bhawk24bob

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I hope that "mentoring" is in your job description and that you're compensated for it if it's a reason to be in the office
 
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And I don't disagree with what you are saying here. In the end every company and individual needs to make their own decisions about their corporate culture. Personally, I think flexibility is going to be the key to successful companies/firms.
Agree on the flexibility.

But maybe it's because I turned 50 last year, but hearing people whine about how awful "working" is makes my eyes roll uncontrollably, especially if their main bitch is having to get their asses up off their couch and go into an office.

godvine-grumpy-neighbor-farmers-christmas-ad.jpg
 
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SoDakHawk

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I mean, other than being paid to do it and it being 100% voluntarily without requiring you to be in a cage or wear a uniform or eat prison food or get anally raped, sure -- pretty much identical. :rolleyes:
LOL. I am not arguing with you, but read the post just below yours. There are a lot of people out there that feel like they have just been used like a tool for years. You like going to the office and like what you do. Actually, so do I. I wouldn't have an issue going back to the office, it's what I have known my entire working life. But I am also seeing the benefits to the new work world. The successful companies will figure it our, offer flexibility and balance, will figure out how to train and pass on experience and knowledge in a remote setting.

It's a brave new world.
 

Rudolph

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I was reading Food and Wine and it had Jersey City as the next big foodie city.
Place started booming right around when I l moved there. My brother was a big gotta-live-in-Manhattan caché guy, even as my apartment was twice the size of his with lower Manhattan view down to Statue of Liberty and beyond views… QE2 used to float past my floor-to-ceiling windows—felt like I could reach out and touch the damn thing… anyways half the rent of his place. Finally got him to consider it so we could be closer. He spent a weekend at my place dog/cat-sitting and remarked that downtown JC vibe kinda reminded him of downtown Iowa City—which I tried to explain to him like a year previously. Anyways he ended up living for several years in JC. It’s now lost some of its charm—just grew too much, now has density too similar to manhattan/Brooklyn. Whereas before it felt like a total relief from that.

Had lots of “secret” great food spots 15 years ago. I’m sure there’s a lot more good spots now.
 

Rudolph

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I assume you rode up the Westside Highway. When I rode for my commute to SOHO from Carroll Gardens, I'd ride across the Brooklyn Bridge, cut across to the Westside Highway and up to SOHO. I loved it. When I moved out to NJ (I think you said you dated a girl from the town I live in now) I really missed my daily commute on my bike. What I missed most was in part the feeling of being alive/excitement of surviving riding the streets of NY and another part of just the daily exercise of that ride every morning and night. My favorite bike ride was my weekend ride where I'd ride up the Westside Highway up to the GW bridge and over to Palisades Park.
I rode up 6th, then down 7th most days. Fixie. Total wannabe bike messenger douchebag. Holding onto cabs and buses. No helmet. Whipping around shoulder to shoulder with all the traffic. Well, morning ride was 6am so not much traffic really but the ride home was a daily decompression adrenaline rush.

Occasionally I rode that west side highway path. Was a member for a few years at Chelsea Piers Athletic Club so rode it frequently those years.
 

Rudolph

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I'm pretty conservative, but I am also practical and a businessman. There are some aspects of the Green New Deal that make sense and are goals we should strive for, there are others that I think are lunacy, and as always the key is in the implementation.

I believe we can transition from a fossil fuel based energy system to a green energy system but it can't be forced by strangling fossil fuel energy producers. All that does is raise energy prices and hurt the lower and middle classes. Hell, I see our dependence on foreign oil (energy) as a national security issue. How awesome would it be if we could tell them in the Middle East to F off, we don't need you?

This country is large enough that we can be self-sufficient in energy production, manufacturing, everything. We should be importing very little. If we produced everything we need at home and are completely self-sustaining all Americans would be better off for it.
I’m speaking to the bolstering of our network of small towns and cities part—wish more folks understood how prominent that thinking is in the GND.
 

Fijimn

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Place started booming right around when I l moved there. My brother was a big gotta-live-in-Manhattan caché guy, even as my apartment was twice the size of his with lower Manhattan view down to Statue of Liberty and beyond views… QE2 used to float past my floor-to-ceiling windows—felt like I could reach out and touch the damn thing… anyways half the rent of his place. Finally got him to consider it so we could be closer. He spent a weekend at my place dog/cat-sitting and remarked that downtown JC vibe kinda reminded him of downtown Iowa City—which I tried to explain to him like a year previously. Anyways he ended up living for several years in JC. It’s now lost some of its charm—just grew too much, now has density too similar to manhattan/Brooklyn. Whereas before it felt like a total relief from that.

Had lots of “secret” great food spots 15 years ago. I’m sure there’s a lot more good spots now.

When most people look for an exciting food city booming with options in the Northeast, they tend to think of New York City. However, mere minutes away by train is NYC's secret "sixth borough": Jersey City. Packed with vibrant food businesses, Jersey City isn't just a spot to drink in the breathtaking view of the skyline across the river—though it certainly is that, too—it's a food city where culture and community keep diners coming back.
Jersey City's huge Asian and Indian population makes up a quarter of its residents (one of the highest percentages in the country), and the food scene showcases a medley of delicious cuisines. First-generation Filipino American families go grocery shopping for bags of warm, fluffy pandesal—a common bread roll in the Philippines—or mocha-flavored cake layered with caramel from the Philippine Bread House and stock up on ensaymada, a rich brioche pastry layered with cheese and butter, at Red Ribbon Bakeshop. The hub of the South Asian community, Newark Avenue, is dotted with Indian and Pakistani restaurants. You can't go wrong here, but one local favorite is Rasoi, a 25-year-old restaurant known for its rich and spicy Punjabi fare. Also on this eat street is the Freetown Road Project, a restaurant from hometown hero chef Claude Lewis. The Chopped champion ties his Antiguan and West Indian roots to his hometown through dishes that range from curry chicken, a luscious stew served with hot, fresh, flaky roti, to dense slabs of mango bread drizzled with mango jam that comes with whipped cayenne cream cheese for spreading.
Frankie in Jersey City

CREDIT: ERIK BERNSTEIN
Italian cuisine also has deep roots here, and the city's new generation of pizza and pasta restaurants alone are worth a special visit. There's Dan Richer, a New Jersey native and James Beard Foundation Rising Star Chef semifinalist, who skipped his college graduation to travel to Italy to learn how to make better pizza. At his restaurant, Razza, he tops crisp, fermented rounds of dough with fresh toppings sourced from local farms—the Garden State Margherita, for example, is sauced with crushed New Jersey heirloom tomatoes and oozes with fresh, milky buffalo mozzarella from Sussex County. For some of the best pasta this side of Liguria, make a reservation at Pasta dal Cuore , a pasta shop owned by Elena Cartagena, who makes fresh pasta every morning.
Frankie in Jersey City

CREDIT: FRANKIE
This city does a great job of satisfying sweet tooths, too. You can get a box of mixed cookies in flavors like cinnamon whiskey crackle from the excellent Bang Cookies or a rich banana pudding from Filipino-owned dessert shop Baonanas. Chase either with a coffee from Clo Coffee Co., a pandemic-born business that is trying to change the conversation around quality, sustainable coffee. When you're ready for cocktail hour, grab a seat at the bar at Frankie, an Australian-inspired spot, to sip on one of their house cocktails or a pour from their selection of natural wines from Europe and Australia. And when it's time to go home, grab a souvenir bottle of whiskey or gin from local favorite Corgi Spirits. —Lauren Musni
 
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SoDakHawk

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I’m speaking to the bolstering of our network of small towns and cities part—wish more folks understood how prominent that thinking is in the GND.
Oh for sure, but rural connectivity has been an initiative that has been pushed long before the GND. It's been going on since Bush and was actually pretty big under both Obama and Trump. I agree we need the investment in infrastructure, however, would that wired investment be wasted if instead everything becomes satellite based like Starlink? Something to think about.
 

Rudolph

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Oct 18, 2001
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When most people look for an exciting food city booming with options in the Northeast, they tend to think of New York City. However, mere minutes away by train is NYC's secret "sixth borough": Jersey City. Packed with vibrant food businesses, Jersey City isn't just a spot to drink in the breathtaking view of the skyline across the river—though it certainly is that, too—it's a food city where culture and community keep diners coming back.
Jersey City's huge Asian and Indian population makes up a quarter of its residents (one of the highest percentages in the country), and the food scene showcases a medley of delicious cuisines. First-generation Filipino American families go grocery shopping for bags of warm, fluffy pandesal—a common bread roll in the Philippines—or mocha-flavored cake layered with caramel from the Philippine Bread House and stock up on ensaymada, a rich brioche pastry layered with cheese and butter, at Red Ribbon Bakeshop. The hub of the South Asian community, Newark Avenue, is dotted with Indian and Pakistani restaurants. You can't go wrong here, but one local favorite is Rasoi, a 25-year-old restaurant known for its rich and spicy Punjabi fare. Also on this eat street is the Freetown Road Project, a restaurant from hometown hero chef Claude Lewis. The Chopped champion ties his Antiguan and West Indian roots to his hometown through dishes that range from curry chicken, a luscious stew served with hot, fresh, flaky roti, to dense slabs of mango bread drizzled with mango jam that comes with whipped cayenne cream cheese for spreading.
Frankie in Jersey City

CREDIT: ERIK BERNSTEIN
Italian cuisine also has deep roots here, and the city's new generation of pizza and pasta restaurants alone are worth a special visit. There's Dan Richer, a New Jersey native and James Beard Foundation Rising Star Chef semifinalist, who skipped his college graduation to travel to Italy to learn how to make better pizza. At his restaurant, Razza, he tops crisp, fermented rounds of dough with fresh toppings sourced from local farms—the Garden State Margherita, for example, is sauced with crushed New Jersey heirloom tomatoes and oozes with fresh, milky buffalo mozzarella from Sussex County. For some of the best pasta this side of Liguria, make a reservation at Pasta dal Cuore , a pasta shop owned by Elena Cartagena, who makes fresh pasta every morning.
Frankie in Jersey City

CREDIT: FRANKIE
This city does a great job of satisfying sweet tooths, too. You can get a box of mixed cookies in flavors like cinnamon whiskey crackle from the excellent Bang Cookies or a rich banana pudding from Filipino-owned dessert shop Baonanas. Chase either with a coffee from Clo Coffee Co., a pandemic-born business that is trying to change the conversation around quality, sustainable coffee. When you're ready for cocktail hour, grab a seat at the bar at Frankie, an Australian-inspired spot, to sip on one of their house cocktails or a pour from their selection of natural wines from Europe and Australia. And when it's time to go home, grab a souvenir bottle of whiskey or gin from local favorite Corgi Spirits. —Lauren Musni
Jersey City was, maybe remains incredibly diverse, but like in a fully integrated way. Neighborhoods, buildings, full diversity within them. 15-20 years ago socioeconomically, too. Probably not as much now. Was always fun to take the late path train from 33rd, when the direct to JC route was closed and all trains routed thru Hoboken first. Because in Hoboken all the monochromatic socioeconomically monocultural white typically obnoxious folks would get off in Hoboken leaving the remaining JC and Newark passengers looking at each other with big signs and wry smiles, big feeling of relief amongst us, enjoying like real diversity that remained. Noah’s Ark type shit, two of everything it seemed.

Anyways, I’m glad I kind of stumbled on it, and enjoyed my years living there immensely.
 

Aardvark86

HR MVP
Jan 23, 2018
1,957
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Is this a law firm or a blue collar prison where you get home released for the evening but need to be back in your cells, errr, office by 8AM the next day? F that.

I am seeing the shift in mentality over the decades and totally support it. The movie Office Space in the 90's nailed it, going to work was like going to prison. Office buildings were the new factory where worker drones punched in, were chained to their desks, then were allowed to punch out at the end of the day. Basically, like a prison. It's not that people don't want to work it's that they don't want to be treated like prisoners anymore.

The one good thing that came out of the pandemic is that it opened many people in this country's eyes up to what life really should be about, freedom, and not being locked in a cube for 8 hours a day/5 days a week.
Lol. Ok to be clear, the tracking is for security in the building, which institutional clients demand and enforce in audits. But we’ve got the data, and we looked at it to assess how our return to work program is playing out. Our program is actually quite flexible, but many associates are simply not making any effort to try even the minimum. It is something you have to be intentional about, no doubt, but they’re not.
 
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Fijimn

HR Legend
May 7, 2008
10,990
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Lol. Ok to be clear, the tracking is for security in the building, which institutional clients demand and enforce in audits. But we’ve got the data, and we looked at it to assess how our return to work program is playing out. Our program is actually quite flexible, but many associates are simply not making any effort to try even the minimum. It is something you have to be intentional about, no doubt, but they’re not.
Use the VPN login data....better picture.
 

Capital1Hawk

HR All-American
Jan 23, 2007
3,429
1,789
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Or you could click a button on your computer and have that 1 minute convo...

You do know there is a software program called Teams. It's pretty awesome. All you have to do is click a button and you can IM chat with anybody in your organization. Click another button and you can talk to each other, see each other, share your screen with a colleague, collaborate and work on projects together in any group size you choose. You can sit in on client calls if you want. It is literally like you are sitting at a desk together and sharing a computer.

You can't train or pass on knowledge to new and younger associates using those tools. That's your own problem.
They have to be available on teams at the time. You are a jackass.
 
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