Iowa Gov. Reynolds calls for end to military COVID vaccine mandate

cigaretteman

HR King
May 29, 2001
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What is wrong with her?:


Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds joined 20 other Republican governors in a letter asking leaders in Congress to repeal the federal COVID-19 vaccine requirement for U.S. military members.
The requirement was enacted in August 2021 by President Joe Biden’s administration.
Reynolds and the other Republican governors are asking congressional leaders to repeal the mandate through the annual defense budget bill or in separate legislation.

“As governors, our ability to respond to natural disasters and conduct emergency operations is contingent upon the strength and size of our National Guard units. As Congressional leaders, it is your duty to provide for the national defense, and therefore, we call upon you to protect the men and women in uniform — who protect us — from an unnecessary vaccine mandate,” the letter reads.


The letter was sent to Democratic majority leaders Nancy Pelosi in the U.S. House and Chuck Schumer in the U.S. Senate, and Republican minority leaders Kevin McCarthy in the House and Mitch McConnell in the Senate.


Thirteen Republican senators, including Rand Paul of Kentucky and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, have threatened to withhold approval for the defense budget bill unless it strips the COVID-19 vaccine requirement for the military, according to national reports.
Iowa’s Republican U.S. Sens. Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst are not among the 13 who signed a letter to McConnell saying they will not support the defense budget bill without a vote on the vaccine mandate.

District associate judge appointed​

Kathryn Austin, of Eldora, was appointed a district associate judge in central Iowa.

Gov. Kim Reynolds appointed Austin, who serves as an assistant county attorney in Marshall County, to Judicial District 2B, which includes Boone, Calhoun, Carroll, Greene, Hamilton, Hardin, Humboldt, Marshall, Pocahontas, Sac, Story, Webster and Wright counties.
Austin received her undergraduate degree from Iowa State University and her law degree from Michigan State University.


 
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Is she going to mandate the DoD drop all 17 current vaccine mandates? Dumb ass.

Current Status of Vaccines for Military Personnel​

The Department of Defense (DoD) administers 17 different vaccines, as outlined in the Joint Instruction on Immunizations and Chemoprophylaxis (Secretaries of the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Transportation, 1995), for the prevention of infectious diseases among military personnel, where appropriate. The vaccines are administered to military personnel on the basis of military occupation, the location of the deployment, and mission requirements. In this chapter, the committee reviews information on the current availability of vaccines to DoD and describes key projects in DoD's vaccine development pipeline.
Go to:

CURRENT STATUS OF VACCINES FOR MILITARY USE​

Table 3-1 provides an overview of the major infectious disease threats to U.S. military personnel and displays whether the appropriate vaccine product is available for military use, is licensed in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is an investigational new drug (IND), or is in development. It is an incomplete list of potential threats and does not include a number of infectious diseases or infectious disease agents for which a vaccine is neither available nor in development, but against which the military might have a need for a vaccine, such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, West Nile encephalitis, Nipah virus, Norwalk virus, Lassa fever, and other common infections or infectious disease agents, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, and tuberculosis. The information presented in the tables that follow are based on material provided by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), FDA, and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) websites, as well as presentations made to the committee.
TABLE 3-1. Status of Vaccines for Specific Infectious Disease Threats to the U.S. Military.

TABLE 3-1

Status of Vaccines for Specific Infectious Disease Threats to the U.S. Military.
The committee is not aware of a standard definition of the term “vaccine availability” or of any threshold for determining whether a vaccine should be considered available. Some vaccines are available only through difficult and unusual processes or circumstances. For example, special operations troops may be at risk for smallpox, and in such cases arrangements must be made to transfer the smallpox vaccine from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to DoD.1 Some vaccines are manufactured in small pilot lots and are available as INDs through DoD's Special Immunizations Program (SIP) to “individuals who have a high occupational risk—laboratory workers, facilities inspectors, vaccine manufacturers and certain military response teams” (Boudreau and Kortepeter, 2002). The precision displayed in Tables 3-1 to 3-5 by the use of dichotomies such as “limited availability” or “unavailable,” although helpful as an overview, belies a fluid and complex actuality. At a minimum, the names of the manufacturers keep changing as corporate entities merge, grow, or realign themselves. International coordination is required for some vaccines that are manufactured outside of the United States but licensed in the United States by FDA. Others are manufactured and licensed outside the United States, presenting different and usually more complex acquisition problems.
 

cigaretteman

HR King
May 29, 2001
73,027
52,690
113
Is she going to mandate the DoD drop all 17 current vaccine mandates? Dumb ass.

Current Status of Vaccines for Military Personnel​

The Department of Defense (DoD) administers 17 different vaccines, as outlined in the Joint Instruction on Immunizations and Chemoprophylaxis (Secretaries of the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Transportation, 1995), for the prevention of infectious diseases among military personnel, where appropriate. The vaccines are administered to military personnel on the basis of military occupation, the location of the deployment, and mission requirements. In this chapter, the committee reviews information on the current availability of vaccines to DoD and describes key projects in DoD's vaccine development pipeline.
Go to:

CURRENT STATUS OF VACCINES FOR MILITARY USE​

Table 3-1 provides an overview of the major infectious disease threats to U.S. military personnel and displays whether the appropriate vaccine product is available for military use, is licensed in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is an investigational new drug (IND), or is in development. It is an incomplete list of potential threats and does not include a number of infectious diseases or infectious disease agents for which a vaccine is neither available nor in development, but against which the military might have a need for a vaccine, such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, West Nile encephalitis, Nipah virus, Norwalk virus, Lassa fever, and other common infections or infectious disease agents, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, and tuberculosis. The information presented in the tables that follow are based on material provided by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), FDA, and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) websites, as well as presentations made to the committee.
TABLE 3-1. Status of Vaccines for Specific Infectious Disease Threats to the U.S. Military.

TABLE 3-1

Status of Vaccines for Specific Infectious Disease Threats to the U.S. Military.
The committee is not aware of a standard definition of the term “vaccine availability” or of any threshold for determining whether a vaccine should be considered available. Some vaccines are available only through difficult and unusual processes or circumstances. For example, special operations troops may be at risk for smallpox, and in such cases arrangements must be made to transfer the smallpox vaccine from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to DoD.1 Some vaccines are manufactured in small pilot lots and are available as INDs through DoD's Special Immunizations Program (SIP) to “individuals who have a high occupational risk—laboratory workers, facilities inspectors, vaccine manufacturers and certain military response teams” (Boudreau and Kortepeter, 2002). The precision displayed in Tables 3-1 to 3-5 by the use of dichotomies such as “limited availability” or “unavailable,” although helpful as an overview, belies a fluid and complex actuality. At a minimum, the names of the manufacturers keep changing as corporate entities merge, grow, or realign themselves. International coordination is required for some vaccines that are manufactured outside of the United States but licensed in the United States by FDA. Others are manufactured and licensed outside the United States, presenting different and usually more complex acquisition problems.
Just more idiotic grandstanding from our "Red State Trailblazer!"
 

lucas80

HR King
Gold Member
Jan 30, 2008
99,798
132,536
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Is she going to mandate the DoD drop all 17 current vaccine mandates? Dumb ass.

Current Status of Vaccines for Military Personnel​

The Department of Defense (DoD) administers 17 different vaccines, as outlined in the Joint Instruction on Immunizations and Chemoprophylaxis (Secretaries of the Air Force, Army, Navy, and Transportation, 1995), for the prevention of infectious diseases among military personnel, where appropriate. The vaccines are administered to military personnel on the basis of military occupation, the location of the deployment, and mission requirements. In this chapter, the committee reviews information on the current availability of vaccines to DoD and describes key projects in DoD's vaccine development pipeline.
Go to:

CURRENT STATUS OF VACCINES FOR MILITARY USE​

Table 3-1 provides an overview of the major infectious disease threats to U.S. military personnel and displays whether the appropriate vaccine product is available for military use, is licensed in the United States by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is an investigational new drug (IND), or is in development. It is an incomplete list of potential threats and does not include a number of infectious diseases or infectious disease agents for which a vaccine is neither available nor in development, but against which the military might have a need for a vaccine, such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, West Nile encephalitis, Nipah virus, Norwalk virus, Lassa fever, and other common infections or infectious disease agents, such as gonorrhea, chlamydia, and tuberculosis. The information presented in the tables that follow are based on material provided by the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), FDA, and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) websites, as well as presentations made to the committee.
TABLE 3-1. Status of Vaccines for Specific Infectious Disease Threats to the U.S. Military.

TABLE 3-1

Status of Vaccines for Specific Infectious Disease Threats to the U.S. Military.
The committee is not aware of a standard definition of the term “vaccine availability” or of any threshold for determining whether a vaccine should be considered available. Some vaccines are available only through difficult and unusual processes or circumstances. For example, special operations troops may be at risk for smallpox, and in such cases arrangements must be made to transfer the smallpox vaccine from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to DoD.1 Some vaccines are manufactured in small pilot lots and are available as INDs through DoD's Special Immunizations Program (SIP) to “individuals who have a high occupational risk—laboratory workers, facilities inspectors, vaccine manufacturers and certain military response teams” (Boudreau and Kortepeter, 2002). The precision displayed in Tables 3-1 to 3-5 by the use of dichotomies such as “limited availability” or “unavailable,” although helpful as an overview, belies a fluid and complex actuality. At a minimum, the names of the manufacturers keep changing as corporate entities merge, grow, or realign themselves. International coordination is required for some vaccines that are manufactured outside of the United States but licensed in the United States by FDA. Others are manufactured and licensed outside the United States, presenting different and usually more complex acquisition problems.
I believe she is only against infectious diseases that made Orange Jesus look bad. That's the point of this move. Polish the image of Orange Jesus.
 

lucas80

HR King
Gold Member
Jan 30, 2008
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Are they required to get the flu shot every year or get discharged?
A lot of people come into the US military who have never had proper health care. People come in needing dental care, needing glasses, and some come in who were deficient in being vaccinated for common diseases.
But, sure, be a victim.
 
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SSG T

HR Legend
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Jul 10, 2002
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Stupid people don't like vaccine mandates. Reynolds joins 20 Republican governors...

Perfectly sums up the situation.
 
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mthawkeyes

HR Heisman
Mar 22, 2007
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Fourmile Creek
If you’re sick, you can’t fight as effectively as you should be able to. If you can’t fight effectively, then other soldiers die.

You don’t have an option to not take a vaccine. That includes a flu vaccine.
Seems obvious enough to me, but I think you're going to have to dumb it down for Trad. The best way is probably to make the case that a corporation would benefit greatly from it at the expense of nearly everyone else.
 
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SSG T

HR Legend
Gold Member
Jul 10, 2002
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Having large numbers of folks in small confines, no worries for the soldiers........

Especially with the highly advanced handling of sick soldiers at the unit level. You know, making them go to morning pt formation at 0600, stand in formation until the DFAC (dining facility) opens at 0630, then go to the Troop Medical Clinic (TMC) which opens at 0700.

Then, after they're seen, give them a rash of s*** because the doc at TMC put them on 48 hr quarters for something that they really need 5 days to recover from. Yeah, sick soldiers are really motivated to go get checked out.
 

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