Keegan Murray Becomes IOWA'S 4TH CONSENSUS 1st Team All American (USBWA, AP, Sporting News, The Athletic, Sports Illustrated)

Franisdaman

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Sporting News 2021-22 college basketball All-America team​

Mike DeCourcy
March 7, 2022


If you saw this coming, perhaps you might consider helping out everyone with a stock tip or two.

The one unanimous All-American for The Sporting News in 2021-22 spent the previous season averaging just 19 minutes in the 10 games he played before deciding to look for a new home. The player who came within a single vote of unanimity started one game all last season and took just a half-dozen shots per game.

And a year later, Oscar Tshiebwe of Kentucky and Johnny Davis are such dominant figures that Tshiebwe appeared on the first team of every ballot from the voters on our blue-ribbon, national panel of college basketball experts, and Davis missed on only one.

They have been essential figures on elite teams, with the Badgers winning a share of the Big Ten Conference regular season championship and Kentucky entering the SEC Tournament with 25 victories and the most impressive performance by any team, the Wildcats' dominance of Big 12 co-champ Kansas at Allen Fieldhouse.

They are not the only great players this season, though. There are guys on this year's third team who might have been first-teamers in other years. There just wasn't enough room. There may be "no great teams" in college hoops this season, but there is a galaxy of star players.

Here is The Sporting News All-America team:

First Team​


Johnny Davis, Wisconsin​

6-5, 194, So. G

Key stats: 20.0 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 44.6 pct. FG

Defining game: 37 points, 14 rebounds, 2 blocks, 2 steals in 74-69 victory at Purdue.

Overview: After a promising freshman season that portended a fine career for the Badgers, Davis has jetted past "fine" with a stunning season that saw him put up 30 in his first game, against 2021 Final Four entrant Houston, and go on to record a total of 15 20-point games. He also is an exceptional defender who can guard multiple positions and has a rare gift for rebounding for a player who spends so much time on the perimeter at both ends.

Oscar Tshiebwe, Kentucky​

6-9, 255, Jr. C

Key stats: 17.3 ppg, 15.3 rpg, 60.pc6 t. FG, 1.5 bpg

Defining game: 17 points, 14 rebounds, 4 steals in 80-62 victory at Kansas.

Overview: He is not an elite scorer but nonetheless anchors the UK attack. He has some issues to repair on defense, but without his presence and his dominance of the boards, the Wildcats would be a defensive sieve. In his first season since transferring from West Virginia, Tshiebwe has been everything to Kentucky at both ends of the floor. Most of all, he has rebounded at a level unseen in Division I basketball since the 1970s.

Ochai Agbaji, Kansas​

6-5, 215, Sr. G

Key stats: 19.8 pg, 5.2 rpg, 47.7 pct. FG, 41.1 3-PT

Defining game: 37 points, 7 rebounds, 7-of-12 3-point shooting in 94-92 double-overtime victory over Texas Tech.

Overview: Those who watched Agbaji face Michigan State in the opening game at the Champions Classic knew they were seeing a different player from the one who wore a Jayhawks uniform over the previous three years. He was embracing the responsibility of serving as KU's primary option, the player who had to score or occupying the opposing defense if KU was going to win. He has produced five games of 25 points or more and hasn't once missed double figures in scoring for the Jayhawks.

Keegan Murray, Iowa​

6-8, 225, So. F

Key stats: 23.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 55.4 pct. FG

Defining game: 28 points on on 10-of-15 shooting in 86-60 victory over Michigan State.

Overview: It's not that Murray does not score from 3-point range; he's hitting 38.5 percent of his attempts. It's that he has scored 676 points while accumulating only 150 of those from behind the 3-point line. He is an amazing finisher around the rim, hitting 63.9 percent on 2-point tries. With a couple blocks per game on average, he also has added considerable bite to the defense in a program that occasionally struggles in that area.

Kofi Cockburn, Illinois​

7-0, 285, Jr. C

Key stats: 21.0 ppg, 10.6 rpg, 59.7 pct. FG

Defining game: 37 points, 12 rebounds, 16-of-19 shooting in 80-67 victory over Wisconsin..

Overview: Cockburn is the sort of physically overpowering center we rarely see in college basketball any longer, a low-post force who demands double (and even triple) teams and manages to find a way to defeat them. He has recorded 14 double-doubles. If he were born in an earlier era, when this degree of size, strength and inside dominance was more valued at the professional level, he probably would have spent this past year excelling in the NBA. The League's loss has been the Illini's gain.

The 4 outlets used by the NCAA to determine its consensus All-America teams:
AP
National Association of Basketball Coaches
United States Basketball Writers Association
Sporting News

Murray is also a finalist for:
Naismith Trophy
Wooden Award
Karl Malone Power Forward of the Year
Lute Olson National Player of the Year


The Full Story:

 
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Franisdaman

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Second Team​


Bennedict Mathurin, Arizona​

6-6, 210, So. G

Key stats: 17.3 ppg, 5.7 rpg, 47.1 pct. FG, 37.9 pct. 3-PT

Defining game: 30 points, 7 rebounds, 5-of-8 3-PT shooting in an 83-79 victory at Illinois.

Overview: Mathurin is one of many Wildcats who made significant improvements in their first season under coach Tommy Lloyd. He has nearly doubled his scoring average, reaching double figures in all but three games. He is an exceptional rebounder for his position and frequently creates opportunities for his teammates, ringing up four or more assists nine times.

Jabari Smith, Auburn​

6-10, 220, Fr. F

Key stats: 17.1 ppg, 6.9 rpg, 43.6 percent 3-PT

Defining game: 25 points, 7 rebounds, 8-of-14 FG shooting in 81-77 victory at Alabama.

Overview: There is no college player better at pulling a 3-pointer from a standing position with a defender directly in his space. That may not come up a ton, but it's a nice asset for a player closely defended. Smith is one of the two or three most talented players in Division I. It sometimes feels like he could do more, but coach Bruce Pearl says Smith has been big when the Tigers needed him.

Jaden Ivey, Purdue​

6-4, 195, So. G

Key stats: 17.2 ppg 4.7 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 45.9 pct. FG

Defining game: 26 points, 6 assists,10-of-17 FG shooting in 84-68 victory over Illinois.

Overview: The most dynamic athlete to appear in Division I basketball in perhaps a decade, Ivey terrorizes defenses with his ability to penetrate the opposing foul lane. He has improved immensely as a shooter in his second season, up form 25.8 percent to a highly respectable 37.1 percent of jumpshots.

Chet Holmgren, Gonzaga​

7-0, 194, Fr. C

Key stats: 14.4 ppg, 9.7 rpg, 43.8 pct 3-PT

Defining game: 20 points, 17 rebounds, 6 assists, 5 rebounds, 9-of-14 shooting in 90-57 victory at BYU.

Overview: It took a while for Holmgren to understand how to apply his amazing talent to Division I basketball. He attempted a total of 15 shots in his first three games combined, firing single-digit shot attempts in 12 of his first 16 games. When the calendar turned to February, though, Holmgren turned into the nations most overwhelming player, with averages of 16.2 points, 11.4 rebounds. 3.8 blocks and 49.9 percent 3-point shooting. He has become a dominant force.

Drew Timme, Gonzaga​

6-10, 235, Jr. F

Key stats: 17.6 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 53.3 pct FG

Defining game: 37 points, 7 rebounds, 3 assists and 15-of-19 shooting in a 86-74 victory over Texas.

Timme is an All-American for The Sporting News for the second consecutive year. He has been an essential ingredient to the Zags' 55 victories in their past 59 games. He had to adjust to a different function with this season's team because of the addition of 7-footer Chet Holmgren in the frontcourt -- a year ago, he most often was the lone big in a four-guard lineup -- and produced 10 20-point games and nine games of 8 rebounds or more.

..................................................


Third Team​



EJ Liddell, Ohio State​

6-7, 240, Jr. F

Overview: There may be no more complete player in college basketball. From the start of the season, Liddell was OSU's one consistent source of offensive production, and he carried that responsibility beautifully. He also was their most impactful defender, using his ability to leap high -- and suddenly -- to rank as the shortest player in the NCAA's top 20 shot blockers. He's so important to the Buckeyes that Liddell played 35 or more minutes 10 times in his final dozen regular-season games.

James Akinjo, Baylor​

6-1, 190, Sr. G

In a season that was a relative desert for high-end point guards, Akinjo stood out as the nation's most consistently impactful at that position -- and he might have contended for first-team honors if not for an injury that knocked him out of two games in the second half of the season and limited him in several others. He produced a dozen games of seven or more assists, including a season-high 11 in a victory over Stanford. The Bears lost the entire starting backcourt from the 2021 NCAA champions, and Akinjo nearly made everyone forget that remarkable trio.

JD Notae, Arkansas​

6-2, 190, Sr. G

Notae grabbed everyone's attention by punishing Kentucky's defense in the Razorbacks' big home win, but he'd done the same to opposing teams from the very start of the season. Notae did not post a single-figure scoring game as he inherited the scoring load from last year's terrific Hogs team and increased his scoring average by nearly 50 percent, to 18.9 points per game.

Collin Gillespie, Villanova​

6-3, 195, Sr. G

Gillespie watched injured as the Wildcats lost close to eventual national champion Baylor in the 2021 Sweet 16, aware he might have made a difference in the final stages of that game. He hasn't wasted the opportunity to rectify that disappointment. The Wildcats won a share of another Big East championship and have ranked among the top teams all season, largely due to Gillespie's timely deep shooting, his punishing physical style in the lane and his exceptional leadership. He ranks as one of college basketball's best shooters, hitting better than 43 percent on threes and 90 percent on free throws.

Paolo Banchero, Duke​

6-10, 235, Fr. F

Banchero made a tremendous impression in his first college game, hitting Kentucky for 22 points and 7 rebounds in a Blue Devils victory over Kentucky. He has the touch and grace of a small forward but the size, muscle and knack for rebounding of a power forward. He hit a freshman wall of sorts in February, but recovered to finish with three consecutive 20-point games and promise of more to come in March.
 
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Franisdaman

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Some dude on here predicted Keegan would score 24 points a game, before the season started. I chastised him for unrealistic expectation. I owe him an apology, whoever that was.
200.gif
 

FWIW4922463

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Having Kofi on the first team is, IMHO, ridiculous. Let's examine the facts. What, exactly, are Kofi's basketball skills:

* Good 3-point shooter? NO (Has he ever taken one?)
* Good mid-range jump shot? NO (Has he ever taken a shot outside 3 feet?)
* Good passer? NO
* Good ball handler? NO (Has he ever dribbled the ball?)
* Good defender? SOMETIMES (Takes up a lot of space down low. Not so great on the perimeter. Gets away with a lot of contact.)
* Good shot blocker? YES
* Good rebounder? YES

And so THAT'S the profile of an All-American?

Anybody who knows anything about basketball knows that Kofi can't dribble, travels on nearly every possession, and can only score from within a few feet of the basket. They also know that to score on those lay-ups, he regularly dips his shoulder and uses his 300 pounds to blast defenders out of the way. According to the rules of basketball, that is an offensive foul every single time, but Kofi--unlike monsters such as, oh, Filip Rabraca--is allowed to use that move with impunity. Without it, Kofi would be mostly useless.

So I wish to object to Kofi's name being associated with the actual great athletes/basketball players on the Sporting News All-American teams.

Now if you wanna talk rugby or football, that might be another story . . .

BTW: When it comes to recognition and college basketball, you might also remember this: In 2007 Todd Lickliter was named NATIONAL COACH OF THE YEAR.
 
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LarryMullenJr.

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Having Kofi on the first team is, IMHO, ridiculous. Let's examine the facts. What, exactly, are Kofi's basketball skills:

* Good 3-point shooter? NO (Has he ever taken one?)
* Good mid-ranger jump shot? NO (Has he ever taken a shot outside 3 feet?)
* Good passer? NO
* Good ball handler? NO (Has he ever dribbled the ball?)
* Good defender? SOMETIMES (Takes up a lot of space down low. Not so great on the perimeter. Gets away with a lot of contact.)
* Good shot blocker? YES
* Good rebounder? YES

And so THAT'S the profile of an All-American?

Anybody who knows anything about basketball knows that Kofi can't dribble, travels on nearly every possession, and can only score from within a few feet of the basket. They also know that to score on those lay-ups, he regularly dips his shoulder and uses his 300 pounds to blast defenders out of the way. According to the rules of basketball, that is an offensive foul every single time, but Kofi--unlike monsters such as, oh, Filip Rabraca--is allowed to use that move with impunity. Without it, Kofi would be mostly useless.

So I wish to object to Kofi's name being associated with the actual great athletes/basketball players on the Sporting News All-American teams.

Now if you wanna talk rugby or football, that might be another story . . .
If he had the hands for it, he'd be a freak TE in a plodding offensive scheme.
 

Hawksfor3

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Beyond The Arc
Having Kofi on the first team is, IMHO, ridiculous. Let's examine the facts. What, exactly, are Kofi's basketball skills:

* Good 3-point shooter? NO (Has he ever taken one?)
* Good mid-ranger jump shot? NO (Has he ever taken a shot outside 3 feet?)
* Good passer? NO
* Good ball handler? NO (Has he ever dribbled the ball?)
* Good defender? SOMETIMES (Takes up a lot of space down low. Not so great on the perimeter. Gets away with a lot of contact.)
* Good shot blocker? YES
* Good rebounder? YES

And so THAT'S the profile of an All-American?

Anybody who knows anything about basketball knows that Kofi can't dribble, travels on nearly every possession, and can only score from within a few feet of the basket. They also know that to score on those lay-ups, he regularly dips his shoulder and uses his 300 pounds to blast defenders out of the way. According to the rules of basketball, that is an offensive foul every single time, but Kofi--unlike monsters such as, oh, Filip Rabraca--is allowed to use that move with impunity. Without it, Kofi would be mostly useless.

So I wish to object to Kofi's name being associated with the actual great athletes/basketball players on the Sporting News All-American teams.

Now if you wanna talk rugby or football, that might be another story . . .

BTW: When it comes to recognition and college basketball, you might also remember this: In 2007 Todd Lickliter was named NATIONAL COACH OF THE YEAR.
But, the announcer called him "The human sledgehammer."
 

Franisdaman

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SI’s College Basketball 2021–22 Men’s All-Americans


The 2021–22 college basketball regular season is officially in the books, with this week marking the full transition into the postseason as the sport gears up for Selection Sunday. It’s been a chaotic season on the hardwood, with several teams rising to No. 1 in the men’s AP poll before Gonzaga settled in at the top for the final stretch. When it came to individual talent, though, the elite were a bit more concentrated, with the Big Ten having a particularly strong showing on Sports Illustrated’s All-American lists.

This year’s All-American honorees, which were separated into first, second and third teams, were chosen by panel vote among the SI college basketball staff, with one earning unanimous first-team selection and designated with an asterisk (*). Be sure to check back on SI.com Wednesday for SI’s women’s All-American teams.

First Team​

Oscar Tshiebwe, Kentucky*​

Tshiebwe sat out the majority of the 2020–21 season after transferring to Lexington from West Virginia but then became an absolute force for the Wildcats. He enters the postseason having posted a double double in 12 straight games, and his torrid numbers on the boards are eye-popping: Tshiebwe leads the country in offensive rebounding percentage, defensive rebounding percentage, offensive rebounds per game and total rebounds. He’s also averaging 16.9 ppg, leading Kentucky in scoring, and tops the country in defensive win shares. Good luck scoring in the paint when he’s patrolling it.

Johnny Davis, Wisconsin​

Davis, arguably the breakout star of this men’s college basketball season, came from relative obscurity to become a National Player of the Year candidate as a sophomore. His tough shot-making ability and even-keeled demeanor have carried the Badgers well beyond preseason expectations for 2021–22, including leading them to a share of the Big Ten regular-season title. The 6'5" wing is averaging 20.0 points, 8.1 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 1.1 steals, his scoring output having nearly tripled his freshman mark.

Kofi Cockburn, Illinois​

Cockburn made big waves over the summer when he spurned the NBA draft and the transfer portal for a third year in Champaign. With Ayo Dosunmu in the pros, the 7-footer took charge of the Illini, averaging 21.0 points and 10.6 rebounds while drawing more fouls per 40 minutes than all but five players nationally. In the process, Illinois captured the No. 1 seed in the Big Ten tournament, earning its first share of the regular-season title since 2005. Cockburn is the heart and soul of the Illini and someone coach Brad Underwood told SI is “potentially the most beloved person in the state of Illinois.”

Keegan Murray, Iowa​

Another Big Ten breakout star on a team that has overachieved, Murray started strong out of the gate and never looked back. He’s been the focal point of the Hawkeyes’ deadly offense, pouring in 23.3 ppg (fourth nationally and first among power conference players) while adding 8.6 rebounds, 2.2 blocks and 1.3 steals. Murray takes impeccable care of the ball, sporting the nation’s sixth-lowest turnover rate, and is an efficient high-volume scorer, sinking 62.6% of his twos and 38% of his thres. Altogether, he has the most win shares in Division I.

Jabari Smith, Auburn​

The only freshman to crack SI’s first team, Smith arrived at Auburn with adroit shooting mechanics and the ideal mindset to help lead the program to its first-ever AP No. 1 ranking. In the process, he may have even played himself into the top pick of the NBA draft over two SI All-American second-teamers. If there’s one knock on Smith, it’s that he’s occasionally not used enough in the Tigers’ offense; In the meantime, he’s averaged 17.9 points, 6.9 rebounds and 1.8 assists while shooting a scorching 43.8% from three at a high volume.


Second Team​

Ochai Agbaji, Kansas​

Agbaji’s decision to return to Lawrence for a senior season has paid big dividends for the Jayhawks. He’s having a career year, with highs of 19.8 points and 5.2 rebounds per game and 41.1% shooting from three, and he recently was awarded Big 12 Player of the Year. The high point of Agbaji’s season to date was a 37-point outburst in a gritty double-overtime win over Texas Tech in January, when he sank seven triples. It came just two days after he dropped 29 points on in-state rival Kansas State.

Chet Holmgren, Gonzaga​

The 7-footer came with massive expectations when he committed to the Zags last spring, becoming the highest-rated recruit in school history. He has largely lived up to them, helping bring a new dimension to the Bulldogs’ defense with his mere presence and threat as a shot-blocker on the interior. Holmgren is nearly averaging a double double with 14.4 points and 9.7 rebounds a game, and he recently had a streak of 13 straight games in double figures snapped. When opponents do dare test him inside, he’s swatting shots at a 12.2% rate (14th nationally) and at a clip of 3.6 per game.

Paolo Banchero, Duke​

Another prized freshman, Banchero is the biggest reason the Blue Devils can dream of sending Coach K off with a national title. He leads the team in points (17.1) and rebounds (7.7), while adding 3.1 assists and shooting 46.3% from the floor. Banchero’s versatility and playmaking ability at 6'10" makes him a handful for opposing defenses, and his ability to draw fouls and generally stay out of foul trouble himself is a great weapon for Duke, which just captured its first ACC regular season title since 2010.

Jaden Ivey, Purdue​

The Boilermakers aren’t short on offensive talent—together, they boast KenPom’s No. 1 adjusted offense—but Ivey is the straw that stirs the drink. The guard’s assumed sophomore breakout fully came to pass this season, and his penchant for hitting tough shots and acrobatic finishes has Purdue dreaming of a possible Final Four. Ivey’s averaging 17.2 points. 4.7 rebounds and 3.0 assists, and perhaps his biggest strides have come from the perimeter, where he now connects on 37% of his attempts compared to 26% as a freshman.

E.J. Liddell, Ohio State​

Liddell tested the NBA draft waters before returning to Columbus, and he’s improved across the board in his junior season. The 6'7" forward is the engine that drives the Buckeyes on both ends, averaging team-highs in points (19.4), rebounds (7.9) and blocks (2.6). Liddell has also shown an increased ability to stretch things out to the perimeter this year, canning 37.5% of his 112 attempts. Ohio State is a team that makes its bones on the offensive end, and Liddell is firmly at the center of that.


Third Team​

Drew Timme, Gonzaga: Timme was the near-consensus preseason NPOY favorite, but the presence of Holmgren and a dip in shooting have kept him out of that conversation. Make no mistake though, he’s still had an excellent year (17.6 points, 6.4 rebounds).

Bennedict Mathurin, Arizona: The 6'6" sophomore has been a huge part of the Wildcats’ resurgence in Year 1 under Tommy Lloyd. His 17.3 ppg and 37.9% mark from three lead the team, and he was a main driver in Arizona’s Pac-12 title.

Tari Eason, LSU: The Tigers’ season has been up and down since a 15–1 start, but it should take nothing away from Eason’s breakout campaign. The former Cincinnati transfer is second nationally in win shares per 40 minutes and averages 16.9 points and 6.9 rebounds.

David Roddy, Colorado State: “The Man in the Arena” has had quite a road to starring in his junior season for the Rams. With the addition of a three-point shot, he put it all together in 2021–22 to the tune of 19.5 ppg, 7.6 rpg, 2.5 apg and 1.4 bpg.

Walker Kessler, Auburn: If Smith wasn’t fearsome enough in the Tigers’ frontcourt, opposing players who dare try to score in the paint are met by Kessler—who leads the country in block rate at a whopping 19.1%, good for 4.5 per game. He averages 11.5 points and 8.2 rebounds to boot.


 

FWIW4922463

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Has there ever been a more overrated college basketball person than Kofi Cockburn? I know I'm nobody, but I thought being an All-American required being an elite athlete with multiple skills. Cockburn is the one-trick pony, and that one trick--running people over--is against the basic rules of basketball. So I must object to this person being given the same recognition as Keegan Murray, who can do everything. Shame on the voters for confusing physical size for athletic talent.
 
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Franisdaman

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The story from the Associate Press:

Big Ten lands three players on AP All-America First Team​

By DAVE SKRETTA
Associated Press
March 15, 2022


600.jpeg


Keegan Murray has given Iowa a first-team Associated Press All-American for the third straight year, and Kofi Cockburn has made it two in a row for Illinois — not bad for a couple programs that haven’t had a whole lot of them.

The Fighting Illini never had a first-team pick until Ayo Dosunmu made it last season when Cockburn was voted to the second team. And the Hawkeyes had not had a first-team selection since the 1952 season until Luka Garza, last year’s AP player of the year, made his second consecutive appearance in the five-man team.

Throw in Wisconsin’s Johnny Davis and the Big Ten was well represented Tuesda on the AP’s first team, which also included Kentucky big man Oscar Tshiebwe — this year’s player of the year favorite — and Kansas guard Ochai Agbaji.

“I’ve had to learn from a lot of guys last year just what it takes to be great at this level,” said Murray, a sophomore guard from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, who is fourth nationally in scoring at 23.6 points per game heading into the NCAA Tournament.

“I mean, it’s kind of like everything just got put together for me,” Murray added, “just all the hard work that we put in.”

The fifth-seeded Hawkeyes, who won the Big Ten Tournament title on Sunday, will open their NCAA tourney on Thursday against Richmond.

“We struggled earlier on this year a little bit and now we’re doing really well,” Murray said, “and it’s just a great feeling.”

All the first-team picks have their teams positioned to make a postseason run.

Cockburn, the bruising forward from Kingston, Jamaica, and the fourth-seeded Fighting Illini play Chattanooga on Friday, the same day Davis and the third-seeded Badgers open against Colgate. Tshiebwe has Kentucky seeded second going into Thursday’s game against Saint Peter’s. Agbaji and the top-seeded Jayhawks open against one of the play-in teams.

Davis is the Badgers’ third first-team All-American, joining Alando Tucker in 2007 and Frank Kaminsky in 2015, while Tshiebwe is the first for Kentucky since Tyler Ulis in 2016. Agbaji gives the Jayhawks a first-team pick for the third time in six years after Frank Mason in 2017 and Devonte Graham in 2018.

Just like Murray with the Hawkeyes, Agbaji already has some experience cutting down nets this season.

The Big 12 player of the year led Kansas past Texas Tech in the conference title game, adding tournament MVP honors to a growing collection of hardware that Agbaji has earned during his senior season.

“It’s great to see him do all these things. He’s accomplishing pretty much every goal he set out to accomplish,” Jayhawks teammate Christian Braun said, “and it’s awesome to watch him every day, you know, work hard and practice hard and do all these things, and then accomplish everything he set out to accomplish.”

SECOND TEAM

Drew Timme of Gonzaga led the AP second team for the second straight year and was joined by freshman teammate Chet Holmgren. Jaden Ivey of Purdue gave the Big Ten another All-American, while likely No. 1 draft pick Jabari Smith of Auburn and Benedict Mathurin of Arizona rounded out the second team.

The Bulldogs, who are the No. 1 overall seed in the NCAA Tournament for the second straight season, also had two second-team picks last year in Timme and Jalen Suggs. Another teammate, Corey Kispert, was a first-teamer last year.

THIRD TEAM

Paolo Banchero of Duke was the only player from the ACC to be chosen for one of the first three teams, while the Blue Devils were the only team from the vaunted basketball conference to land in the final Top 25 poll this season. Banchero also will go down as the final All-American in a long list to have played for retiring Blue Devils coach Mike Krzyzewski.

Banchero was joined on the third team by Collin Gillespie of Villanova and E.J. Liddell of Ohio State, both of whom were honorable mention picks last season, and Walker Kessler of Auburn. James Akinjo of Baylor and JD Notae of Arkansas tied for the last spot on the third team, giving it six members rather than five.

HONORABLE MENTION

David Roddy of Colorado State was the top vote getter among the honorable mention selections. Others to receive the honor include Armando Bacot of North Carolina; Johnny Juzang of UCLA; Alondes Williams of Wake Forest; Tari Eason of LSU; Zach Edey of Purdue; two-time pick Max Abmas of Oral Roberts; and Ron Harper Jr. of Rutgers


 

CoachH

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Has there ever been a more overrated college basketball person than Kofi Cockburn? I know I'm nobody, but I thought being an All-American required being an elite athlete with multiple skills. Cockburn is the one-trick pony, and that one trick--running people over--is against the basic rules of basketball. So I must object to this person being given the same recognition as Keegan Murray, who can do everything. Shame on the voters for confusing physical size for athletic talent.
But he is really, really good.
 
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DewHawk

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Iowa has been very fortunate over the last 3/4 years given the AA's they have had in Women's BBall, Men;s BBall, Football, and wrestling. Pretty amazing!
 

BurgHawk87

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But he is really, really good.
Think he comes back for a senior season? I don't see a huge future in the NBA for him, or overseas for that matter. But I'm also not a scout or have the slightest inkling toward projections.
 

Franisdaman

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I'm mad again just reading and seeing this again. About as bad as Andre Woolridge not getting B10 POY in the late 90s, I think some Gopher got it and then it was revealed they were cheating under Haskins.

Does Keegan have a chance yet at National Player of the Year?

this is what Jon Rothstein of CBS Sports has to say on the matter:


 
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ChiPackHawk

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Unless I miss counted, only one ACC player on the first three teams. Oh how the mighty have fallen. Congrats to Keegan - well earned and deserved.
 
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HawkLogic

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It's insane to think that how the B1G totally dominates the list of All Americans, but it doesn't have a killer team like Zona, Kentucky, Gonzaga, etc.

Iowa is killer team, dude.

Keegan is best player in college B-ball right now and I'd rather have my best player be a guy like Keegan that can creat his own shot and handle the ball vs a Cockburn or the Purdue's dual centers or Kentucky wih 6'9 rebounding mountain.
 
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fezzador

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Iowa is killer team, dude.

Keegan is best player in college B-ball right now and I'd rather have my best player be a guy like Keegan that can creat his own shot and handle the ball vs a Cockburn or the Purdue's dual centers or Kentucky wih 6'9 rebounding mountain.
I really freakin' hope so!
 

notlongago

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Jul 28, 2012
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Has there ever been a more overrated college basketball person than Kofi Cockburn? I know I'm nobody, but I thought being an All-American required being an elite athlete with multiple skills. Cockburn is the one-trick pony, and that one trick--running people over--is against the basic rules of basketball. So I must object to this person being given the same recognition as Keegan Murray, who can do everything. Shame on the voters for confusing physical size for athletic talent.
We get it - you dont like him. You've made it abundantly clear your knowledge on traditional center play is limited at best. Drop it.
 
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Stephen Hawk King

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Iowa is killer team, dude.

Keegan is best player in college B-ball right now and I'd rather have my best player be a guy like Keegan that can creat his own shot and handle the ball vs a Cockburn or the Purdue's dual centers or Kentucky wih 6'9 rebounding mountain.
Ok but Purdue's best player is Jaden Ivey, and like Keegan, he's a superstar.