The top 10 Democratic candidates for president in 2024, ranked

cigaretteman

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10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Remember how we mentioned pretty much everyone has indicated they’ll defer to Biden (whether or not they would ultimately do so)? Well, the New York congresswoman is the big name who hasn’t really done so. She recently declined to say whether she’ll back Biden in 2024, citing the fact that he’s not running yet. But that fact hasn’t stopped others from saying they would stand behind Biden. Ocasio-Cortez, of course, is very young. And we shouldn’t necessarily take this is posturing for a run; she also has an interest in assuring Biden caters to her wing of the party, after all. (Previous ranking: 10)
9. Roy Cooper: The North Carolina governor is the would-be hopeful pushed by a set of Democratic strategists who think the best course is to nominate a Southern governor with proven crossover appeal (which Cooper certainly has). Whether he has any designs on running is another matter. The longtime former state attorney general had to be talked into running for governor in 2016, after all. So does he really have the desire to take the next, much-bigger step? It’s a very valid question: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) was a leading hopeful in 2020 before he decided he didn’t have the fire in the belly. Cooper can make an argument that few on this list can make, having won repeatedly in a state carried by Republican presidential nominees, including in the same election. (Previous ranking: 6)
8. Gretchen Whitmer: The Michigan governor checks a lot of boxes as a well-regarded, proven commodity in a swing state. And if she can win her 2022 reelection race — no easy proposition in this environment, but one aided by the GOP’s ballot problems — she’ll likely vault up this list. Interestingly, Whitmer recently passed on an opportunity to say whether she’d urge Biden to run again: “You know, I’m not going to weigh in on whether he should run,” she said, adding, “If he does run, he’ll have my support.” (Previous ranking: N/A)



7. Gavin Newsom: Perhaps nobody is making early and interesting plays these days as much as the California governor. He recently launched ads in Florida aimed at Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), the second-most-likely 2024 GOP nominee in our rankings. And Newsom has offered not-terribly-subtle criticisms of how his party is prosecuting the national political debate. We still don’t know that a former San Francisco mayor is really what Democrats are looking for, but it’s as evident as ever that Newsom is building toward something, no matter how much he downplays it. (Previous ranking: 9)
6. Bernie Sanders: Shortly after our last rankings, something interesting happened: Sanders’s 2020 campaign put out a memo stating that Sanders might run again, if Biden doesn’t: “In the event of an open 2024 Democratic presidential primary, Sen. Sanders has not ruled out another run for president, so we advise that you answer any questions about 2024 with that in mind,” the memo told supporters. The 80-year-old independent senator from Vermont had previously stated that he was “very, very unlikely” to ever run again, which at the time took him off this list. After the memo went public, Politico reported that Sanders himself had approved it. (Previous ranking: N/A)
5. Elizabeth Warren: The senator from Massachusetts has carved out some of her own space in the post-Roe v. Wade debate, proposing a crackdown on crisis pregnancy centers which she said are often “deceptive” efforts to “harass or otherwise frighten people who are pregnant to keep them from seeking an abortion.” She has frequently said she’s running for reelection and not president — but in that present-tense way that doesn’t specifically rule out that changing in the future. (Previous ranking: 4)







4. Amy Klobuchar: The best hope for the senator from Minnesota might be that Biden recovers but decides not to run anyway; her political profile is somewhat similar to Biden’s — that of a more traditional, pragmatic politician who isn’t necessarily going to wow anyone. It didn’t pan out for her in 2020, but without Biden in the race and potentially with Trump looming as the alternative, perhaps Democrats might be tempted for a similar recipe to what won in 2020. (Previous ranking: 5)
3. Kamala D. Harris: Historically, vice presidents have been able to craft images somewhat apart from the presidents they serve. But Harris has seen her image decline right alongside Biden’s. Just as Biden appears to be the most unpopular president at this point in his first term since Harry S. Truman, she is one of the most unpopular modern vice presidents at this point. She has a bigger pedestal than anybody on this list in the event of a post-Biden race. But the way things are going right now, she would need to somehow differentiate herself. And that’s not an easy trick when you’ve still got your day job. (Previous ranking: 3)
2. Pete Buttigieg: The transportation secretary continues to carve out a potentially attractive space in Democratic politics, quite apart from his Cabinet duties: as the guy able to go on Fox News and combat the right’s talking points in a calm and steady manner. Most recently, he did so on a protest of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh at a steakhouse. Similar to Newsom, if Democrats are putting a premium on the ability to drive a message against Republicans — a not-insignificant consideration in modern politics — Buttigieg makes a lot of sense. (Previous ranking: 2)







1. President Biden: Biden has almost always couched his 2024 plans as saying he “intends” to run, which carries some wiggle room. But The Washington Post’s Tyler Pager and Michael Scherer reported recently that it’s not just idle talk: that Biden’s political operation is doing the things you would expect to announce a reelection campaign next year. Biden this week also offered an animated response to the poll mentioned above, saying, “Read the polls, Jack. You guys are all the same. That poll showed that 92 percent of Democrats, if I ran, would vote for me.” That’s true, and he still narrowly led Trump 44-41 in a 2020 rematch, but all that’s in the general election. And polls show significantly fewer Democratic primary voters say they would vote to advance him to that contest. (Previous ranking: 1)

 
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QChawks

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4,6,8,9 are the options I’d consider alternative Warren may be too damaged by dumdum MAGA marketing similar to HRC.
 

Finance85

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Oct 22, 2003
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It would be a massive blunder imo if Biden were to run unopposed in ‘24.
If you had to pick two out of the 10 to primary Biden, who would they be?

I see quite a few on that list who would arguably be worse disasters for the country than Biden.
 

seminole97

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Jun 14, 2005
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It would definitely bring more voters out in the primaries. The AOC supporters and those not wanting her anywhere near the nomination. Now that I think about it I hope she does. 😀
At first I didn’t think she’d be old enough, as she’s only 32 today.
Turns out she’s an October baby, so she’ll be 420 months old at the next presidential election and thereby has my vote.
 

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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I think some are underestimating Booty-judge.

To be sure, having been given a Cabinet position that doesn't demand too much. This was to be his audition for a job bigger than college-town midwestern mayor. And it's not like he's lit it up, Which is saying something for a former consultant who ought to be able to tackle issues like "mere" logistics. And there will be people who will disqualify him for - well, you know - but those people probably wouldn't vote for him anyway.

But, he is something of a technocrat, and he does have the ability to be calm and explanatory and sound a lot more like an adult than most of these people. If he can avoid the temptation to be snarky, and if the electorate is in the mood for some calm, I think he could do well.

Otherwise, 4, 8, 9. 4 needs to be able to participate in a way that is more than just a punch line deliverer. 8 and 9 obviously have the issue of the need for rapid acceleration of name recognition.

BTW, re: post 2, item 2, you may want to get yourself checked for diverticulitis.
 

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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Dorky, gay, white guy struggles to get black support in a Democratic primary. Outside of Iowa that matters.
A lot.
no doubt.

out of curiosity, of the group above, who do you see as the candidate most likely to draw AA support (other than 1)? I honestly have no idea.
 

seminole97

HR Legend
Jun 14, 2005
17,434
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no doubt.

out of curiosity, of the group above, who do you see as the candidate most likely to draw AA support (other than 1)? I honestly have no idea.
I guessed Bernie, and checking this Jan ‘20 article he was #2 behind Biden (riding obviously the Obama coattails):


The poll shows that 48% of registered black Democratic voters nationwide support Biden for the nomination, a double digit advantage over the other candidates. The poll was released on Saturday -- nearly two months before the South Carolina primary, which stands as the first real test of black support in the Democratic primary.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has the backing of 20% of black Democratic voters, with Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren at 9%, former New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg at 4%, New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker at 4%, and businessman Andrew Yang at 3%
 

Tom Paris

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10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Remember how we mentioned pretty much everyone has indicated they’ll defer to Biden (whether or not they would ultimately do so)? Well, the New York congresswoman is the big name who hasn’t really done so. She recently declined to say whether she’ll back Biden in 2024, citing the fact that he’s not running yet. But that fact hasn’t stopped others from saying they would stand behind Biden. Ocasio-Cortez, of course, is very young. And we shouldn’t necessarily take this is posturing for a run; she also has an interest in assuring Biden caters to her wing of the party, after all. (Previous ranking: 10)
9. Roy Cooper: The North Carolina governor is the would-be hopeful pushed by a set of Democratic strategists who think the best course is to nominate a Southern governor with proven crossover appeal (which Cooper certainly has). Whether he has any designs on running is another matter. The longtime former state attorney general had to be talked into running for governor in 2016, after all. So does he really have the desire to take the next, much-bigger step? It’s a very valid question: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) was a leading hopeful in 2020 before he decided he didn’t have the fire in the belly. Cooper can make an argument that few on this list can make, having won repeatedly in a state carried by Republican presidential nominees, including in the same election. (Previous ranking: 6)
8. Gretchen Whitmer: The Michigan governor checks a lot of boxes as a well-regarded, proven commodity in a swing state. And if she can win her 2022 reelection race — no easy proposition in this environment, but one aided by the GOP’s ballot problems — she’ll likely vault up this list. Interestingly, Whitmer recently passed on an opportunity to say whether she’d urge Biden to run again: “You know, I’m not going to weigh in on whether he should run,” she said, adding, “If he does run, he’ll have my support.” (Previous ranking: N/A)



7. Gavin Newsom: Perhaps nobody is making early and interesting plays these days as much as the California governor. He recently launched ads in Florida aimed at Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), the second-most-likely 2024 GOP nominee in our rankings. And Newsom has offered not-terribly-subtle criticisms of how his party is prosecuting the national political debate. We still don’t know that a former San Francisco mayor is really what Democrats are looking for, but it’s as evident as ever that Newsom is building toward something, no matter how much he downplays it. (Previous ranking: 9)
6. Bernie Sanders: Shortly after our last rankings, something interesting happened: Sanders’s 2020 campaign put out a memo stating that Sanders might run again, if Biden doesn’t: “In the event of an open 2024 Democratic presidential primary, Sen. Sanders has not ruled out another run for president, so we advise that you answer any questions about 2024 with that in mind,” the memo told supporters. The 80-year-old independent senator from Vermont had previously stated that he was “very, very unlikely” to ever run again, which at the time took him off this list. After the memo went public, Politico reported that Sanders himself had approved it. (Previous ranking: N/A)
5. Elizabeth Warren: The senator from Massachusetts has carved out some of her own space in the post-Roe v. Wade debate, proposing a crackdown on crisis pregnancy centers which she said are often “deceptive” efforts to “harass or otherwise frighten people who are pregnant to keep them from seeking an abortion.” She has frequently said she’s running for reelection and not president — but in that present-tense way that doesn’t specifically rule out that changing in the future. (Previous ranking: 4)







4. Amy Klobuchar: The best hope for the senator from Minnesota might be that Biden recovers but decides not to run anyway; her political profile is somewhat similar to Biden’s — that of a more traditional, pragmatic politician who isn’t necessarily going to wow anyone. It didn’t pan out for her in 2020, but without Biden in the race and potentially with Trump looming as the alternative, perhaps Democrats might be tempted for a similar recipe to what won in 2020. (Previous ranking: 5)
3. Kamala D. Harris: Historically, vice presidents have been able to craft images somewhat apart from the presidents they serve. But Harris has seen her image decline right alongside Biden’s. Just as Biden appears to be the most unpopular president at this point in his first term since Harry S. Truman, she is one of the most unpopular modern vice presidents at this point. She has a bigger pedestal than anybody on this list in the event of a post-Biden race. But the way things are going right now, she would need to somehow differentiate herself. And that’s not an easy trick when you’ve still got your day job. (Previous ranking: 3)
2. Pete Buttigieg: The transportation secretary continues to carve out a potentially attractive space in Democratic politics, quite apart from his Cabinet duties: as the guy able to go on Fox News and combat the right’s talking points in a calm and steady manner. Most recently, he did so on a protest of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh at a steakhouse. Similar to Newsom, if Democrats are putting a premium on the ability to drive a message against Republicans — a not-insignificant consideration in modern politics — Buttigieg makes a lot of sense. (Previous ranking: 2)







1. President Biden: Biden has almost always couched his 2024 plans as saying he “intends” to run, which carries some wiggle room. But The Washington Post’s Tyler Pager and Michael Scherer reported recently that it’s not just idle talk: that Biden’s political operation is doing the things you would expect to announce a reelection campaign next year. Biden this week also offered an animated response to the poll mentioned above, saying, “Read the polls, Jack. You guys are all the same. That poll showed that 92 percent of Democrats, if I ran, would vote for me.” That’s true, and he still narrowly led Trump 44-41 in a 2020 rematch, but all that’s in the general election. And polls show significantly fewer Democratic primary voters say they would vote to advance him to that contest. (Previous ranking: 1)

I'm trying to decide which one of those people McConnell will work with. Thinking NONE.
 

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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I'm trying to decide which one of those people McConnell will work with. Thinking NONE.
Well, given the way things currently are, if one of them is elected president in 2024, my guess is that the winner will be worried a lot less about working with McConnell than he/she is about working with Schumer.
 

Tom Paris

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Oct 1, 2001
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We’re doomed.

4 and 9 are the only options.
We're doomed no matter who is President and can't get anything they want to accomplish through Congress. Damn, McConnell is loving this. You're right, we're doomed, but not because of this list of candidates. We're doomed because of people who support Donald Trump and his wacko followers who are running for various leadership positions in Congress and Governorships.
 

Tom Paris

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Well, given the way things currently are, if one of them is elected president in 2024, my guess is that the winner will be worried a lot less about working with McConnell than he/she is about working with Schumer.
Other than AOC, which there is no way in hell she is going to be the democratic candidate in 24, I don't think any of the others will have a problem working with Chuck. I just want to see Mitch neutered and the democrats can truly push the agenda. If they do, and it literally fails the country, then I can eat crow for the rest of my life. I want to at least see it. Especially with health care costs. I'm tired of the racket and Americans getting ripped off like in no other country.
 

Finance85

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Oct 22, 2003
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Honesty I would take any of Pete, Amy or Whitmer. Dems desperately need a Midwestern flavor on the ticket imo.

I don’t know enough about Cooper.
I liked Pete and Amy during the last primary. Pete has been unimpressive in his current role, simply supporting the weak narrative on supply chain and fuel problems with very little to offer in alternatives. Amy has been very party line, even when it's gone against her moderate leanings. Whitmer is scary, based on her handling of Covid in Michigan. I could possibly be convinced to vote for Pete or Amy, but never Whitmer. It's a fun conversation though.

I left NC before Cooper became governor. My ex (no pics) isn't a fan of Cooper. She's pretty conservative (not a Trump fan either), so that's no surprise. Cooper would likely be my 3rd choice on the list.

My last choice would be Warren, the Harris. I'd vote for Biden before either of those two. I'd vote for AOC before those two.
 
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sober_teacher

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I liked Pete and Amy during the last primary. Pete has been unimpressive in his current role, simply supporting the weak narrative on supply chain and fuel problems with very little to offer in alternatives. Amy has been very party line, even when it's gone against her moderate leanings. Whitmer is scary, based on her handling of Covid in Michigan. I could possibly be convinced to vote for Pete or Amy, but never Whitmer. It's a fun conversation though.

I left NC before Cooper became governor. My ex (no pics) isn't a fan of Cooper. She's pretty conservative (not a Trump fan either), so that's no surprise. Cooper would likely be my 3rd choice on the list.

My last choice would be Warren, the Harris. I'd vote for Biden before either of those two. I'd vote for AOC before those two.

I’m not necessarily judging Pete in his DoT role as I’m not entirely sure what he could be doing differently. Whitmer, I think in part it got very contentious with the GOP there and she took a harder line than she could have or should have.
 
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ericram

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Nov 5, 2002
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It would be interesting to see how well he’d be received outside the west/east coasts. Not sure if he’d be able to shed the California liberal label.

He’d be an interesting candidate, I’m just not sure of his appeal.

AOC I think runs for senate the next opportunity she can.
He was married to that crazy guilfoil chick who is with Don Jr now. So there is that.
 

littlez

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Jan 29, 2003
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Why is everyone down on Newsome?
Many thoughts on this. So many on here claim to be "moderate" in their views, either Dem or Republican. Biden was supposedly chosen over Bernie as he was (and is) very much a moderate Dem who could supposedly reach across the aisle and hopefully get things done. How is that going? Now I'm not going to blame Joe for everything as Manchin and Sinema have absolutely just killed him. At this point there is no working across the aisle. Look what will happen if the Republicans regain all control. For you so called "moderate" Republicans, name me one moderate Republican that you think has a chance of winning? And in God's name don't say DeSantis. I love to see what Newsome is doing lately. I think he's putting his name in the ring. If we really want REAL change, like climate change laws, etc., it's never going to happen w/a moderate Democrat. Biden has proven that. While he did the entire world a favor by running and beating the biggest piece of shit ever in the Presidency, he has not been able to reach across the aisle whatsoever. If we want real change we need a progressive candidate. If Bernie weren't so old he would be my guy but the Dems won't let him win.
 

ericram

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Many thoughts on this. So many on here claim to be "moderate" in their views, either Dem or Republican. Biden was supposedly chosen over Bernie as he was (and is) very much a moderate Dem who could supposedly reach across the aisle and hopefully get things done. How is that going? Now I'm not going to blame Joe for everything as Manchin and Sinema have absolutely just killed him. At this point there is no working across the aisle. Look what will happen if the Republicans regain all control. For you so called "moderate" Republicans, name me one moderate Republican that you think has a chance of winning? And in God's name don't say DeSantis. I love to see what Newsome is doing lately. I think he's putting his name in the ring. If we really want REAL change, like climate change laws, etc., it's never going to happen w/a moderate Democrat. Biden has proven that. While he did the entire world a favor by running and beating the biggest piece of shit ever in the Presidency, he has not been able to reach across the aisle whatsoever. If we want real change we need a progressive candidate. If Bernie weren't so old he would be my guy but the Dems won't let him win.
I am not sure going more progressive or more left is the answer either.
 

littlez

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Jan 29, 2003
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I am not sure going more progressive or more left is the answer either.
You have me confused. Which doesn't take much. Are you saying that because you don't think they can win or you don't think that is where the country should go? Again, how is the so called middle game going for the Democrats and Joe right now? How's his approval rate? Again, the Fake Democrats Manchin and Sinema have absolutely blown him up. However Joe has basically let them just walk all over him and make him look weak. I think what has also happened is that some of the more progressive Democrats hoped that he would be able to make some changes that way and basically zero have happened.
 
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Bill Doak and 9 others

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10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Remember how we mentioned pretty much everyone has indicated they’ll defer to Biden (whether or not they would ultimately do so)? Well, the New York congresswoman is the big name who hasn’t really done so. She recently declined to say whether she’ll back Biden in 2024, citing the fact that he’s not running yet. But that fact hasn’t stopped others from saying they would stand behind Biden. Ocasio-Cortez, of course, is very young. And we shouldn’t necessarily take this is posturing for a run; she also has an interest in assuring Biden caters to her wing of the party, after all. (Previous ranking: 10)
9. Roy Cooper: The North Carolina governor is the would-be hopeful pushed by a set of Democratic strategists who think the best course is to nominate a Southern governor with proven crossover appeal (which Cooper certainly has). Whether he has any designs on running is another matter. The longtime former state attorney general had to be talked into running for governor in 2016, after all. So does he really have the desire to take the next, much-bigger step? It’s a very valid question: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) was a leading hopeful in 2020 before he decided he didn’t have the fire in the belly. Cooper can make an argument that few on this list can make, having won repeatedly in a state carried by Republican presidential nominees, including in the same election. (Previous ranking: 6)
8. Gretchen Whitmer: The Michigan governor checks a lot of boxes as a well-regarded, proven commodity in a swing state. And if she can win her 2022 reelection race — no easy proposition in this environment, but one aided by the GOP’s ballot problems — she’ll likely vault up this list. Interestingly, Whitmer recently passed on an opportunity to say whether she’d urge Biden to run again: “You know, I’m not going to weigh in on whether he should run,” she said, adding, “If he does run, he’ll have my support.” (Previous ranking: N/A)



7. Gavin Newsom: Perhaps nobody is making early and interesting plays these days as much as the California governor. He recently launched ads in Florida aimed at Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), the second-most-likely 2024 GOP nominee in our rankings. And Newsom has offered not-terribly-subtle criticisms of how his party is prosecuting the national political debate. We still don’t know that a former San Francisco mayor is really what Democrats are looking for, but it’s as evident as ever that Newsom is building toward something, no matter how much he downplays it. (Previous ranking: 9)
6. Bernie Sanders: Shortly after our last rankings, something interesting happened: Sanders’s 2020 campaign put out a memo stating that Sanders might run again, if Biden doesn’t: “In the event of an open 2024 Democratic presidential primary, Sen. Sanders has not ruled out another run for president, so we advise that you answer any questions about 2024 with that in mind,” the memo told supporters. The 80-year-old independent senator from Vermont had previously stated that he was “very, very unlikely” to ever run again, which at the time took him off this list. After the memo went public, Politico reported that Sanders himself had approved it. (Previous ranking: N/A)
5. Elizabeth Warren: The senator from Massachusetts has carved out some of her own space in the post-Roe v. Wade debate, proposing a crackdown on crisis pregnancy centers which she said are often “deceptive” efforts to “harass or otherwise frighten people who are pregnant to keep them from seeking an abortion.” She has frequently said she’s running for reelection and not president — but in that present-tense way that doesn’t specifically rule out that changing in the future. (Previous ranking: 4)







4. Amy Klobuchar: The best hope for the senator from Minnesota might be that Biden recovers but decides not to run anyway; her political profile is somewhat similar to Biden’s — that of a more traditional, pragmatic politician who isn’t necessarily going to wow anyone. It didn’t pan out for her in 2020, but without Biden in the race and potentially with Trump looming as the alternative, perhaps Democrats might be tempted for a similar recipe to what won in 2020. (Previous ranking: 5)
3. Kamala D. Harris: Historically, vice presidents have been able to craft images somewhat apart from the presidents they serve. But Harris has seen her image decline right alongside Biden’s. Just as Biden appears to be the most unpopular president at this point in his first term since Harry S. Truman, she is one of the most unpopular modern vice presidents at this point. She has a bigger pedestal than anybody on this list in the event of a post-Biden race. But the way things are going right now, she would need to somehow differentiate herself. And that’s not an easy trick when you’ve still got your day job. (Previous ranking: 3)
2. Pete Buttigieg: The transportation secretary continues to carve out a potentially attractive space in Democratic politics, quite apart from his Cabinet duties: as the guy able to go on Fox News and combat the right’s talking points in a calm and steady manner. Most recently, he did so on a protest of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh at a steakhouse. Similar to Newsom, if Democrats are putting a premium on the ability to drive a message against Republicans — a not-insignificant consideration in modern politics — Buttigieg makes a lot of sense. (Previous ranking: 2)







1. President Biden: Biden has almost always couched his 2024 plans as saying he “intends” to run, which carries some wiggle room. But The Washington Post’s Tyler Pager and Michael Scherer reported recently that it’s not just idle talk: that Biden’s political operation is doing the things you would expect to announce a reelection campaign next year. Biden this week also offered an animated response to the poll mentioned above, saying, “Read the polls, Jack. You guys are all the same. That poll showed that 92 percent of Democrats, if I ran, would vote for me.” That’s true, and he still narrowly led Trump 44-41 in a 2020 rematch, but all that’s in the general election. And polls show significantly fewer Democratic primary voters say they would vote to advance him to that contest. (Previous ranking: 1)

Sad if true.

Pubs are no better though.
 

ericram

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Nov 5, 2002
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You have me confused. Which doesn't take much. Are you saying that because you don't think they can win or you don't think that is where the country should go? Again, how is the so called middle game going for the Democrats and Joe right now? How's his approval rate? Again, the Fake Democrats Manchin and Sinema have absolutely blown him up. However Joe has basically let them just walk all over him and make him look weak. I think what has also happened is that some of the more progressive Democrats hoped that he would be able to make some changes that way and basically zero have happened.
What I am saying is a large percentage of Americans do not want progressive or ultra left leadership.
If Biden could not get the 50 votes what makes you think that Bernie would be able to make that happen or somebody on his side of the progressive wing. If you weren't paying attention the progressives and the ultra left wing lost seats in the House in 2000. More seats are going to be lost in the house this election. It's not that hard to understand. Are you still confused?
 

Steamboat529529

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May 27, 2021
340
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Democratic candidate almost doesn’t matter. All that matters is if Trump wins the Republicans ticket. Democrats have to play this balancing game of knowing he’s dangerous for the country but he’s also their best chance at winning.
 

tarheelbybirth

HR King
Apr 17, 2003
67,416
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I left NC before Cooper became governor. My ex (no pics) isn't a fan of Cooper. She's pretty conservative (not a Trump fan either), so that's no surprise. Cooper would likely be my 3rd choice on the list.
Head and shoulders...and torso...and hips...thighs...calves...better than the idiot he replaced. McCrory is the slime stuck to the bottom of Cooper's shoes. He won the NC governorship both times Trump carried the state. RC has been stuck with a GOP majority in both houses but at least his veto now counts for something. He's worked across the aisle to get a budget put together and passed for the first time in a while and has the GOP on the cusp of accepting Medicaid expansion. I've never heard him even hint at seeking a higher office, however.
 

WDSMHAWK

HR MVP
Jun 30, 2019
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West Des Moines
AOC gets a lot of crap, but she'd be the Dems best option at getting millenials and Gen Z out to vote. But realistically she needs to wait until a majority of Boomers die out (voters and politicians) to actually be elected POTUS and achieve anything.

Warren. Bernie, & Biden will be too old.

Top 3 would be Newsom, Whitmer, and
Buttigieg.

Kamala and Klobuchar don't have the popularity to win the nomination let alone the general.

I know nothing of Cooper so I won't make a judgement on him.
 
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littlez

HR Heisman
Jan 29, 2003
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What I am saying is a large percentage of Americans do not want progressive or ultra left leadership.
If Biden could not get the 50 votes what makes you think that Bernie would be able to make that happen or somebody on his side of the progressive wing. If you weren't paying attention the progressives and the ultra left wing lost seats in the House in 2000. More seats are going to be lost in the house this election. It's not that hard to understand. Are you still confused?
Funny how everyone wants to blame the ultra left wing for policies that don’t even get passed. I know I know, the radical left is taking over.
 
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