The top 10 Democratic candidates for president in 2024, ranked

wcbtee

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AOC ??? For the love of all that is holy, I didn‘t realize the question was ….. Can you name the only person in the world that would make you consider voting for Trump or Biden In ‘24.

It’s time for Noah to start gathering the animals In pairs.
 
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jberesford

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What a horrible list. This looks like the political equivalent of a shitty college football team that used to be good 20 years ago seeking their next OC from a sea of previously fired re-treads no one wants anymore or trendy but no substance 'up-and-comers' that real programs don't really want either.
 

EasyHawk

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You have me confused. Which doesn't take much. Are you saying that because you don't think they can win or you don't think that is where the country should go? Again, how is the so called middle game going for the Democrats and Joe right now? How's his approval rate? Again, the Fake Democrats Manchin and Sinema have absolutely blown him up. However Joe has basically let them just walk all over him and make him look weak. I think what has also happened is that some of the more progressive Democrats hoped that he would be able to make some changes that way and basically zero have happened.
I thought Joe would be much more moderate. Instead he got into office and he turned into extreme far left socialist guy.
 

littlez

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Jan 29, 2003
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Is there anybody with any experience actually doing something?
It’s hard to get anything accomplished, and I never thought I’d say this, when neither side is willing to reach across the aisle. Again, it’s also impossible when 2 from your supposed own party have their hands out to special interest groups and stonewall you at every turn.
 

billanole

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10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Remember how we mentioned pretty much everyone has indicated they’ll defer to Biden (whether or not they would ultimately do so)? Well, the New York congresswoman is the big name who hasn’t really done so. She recently declined to say whether she’ll back Biden in 2024, citing the fact that he’s not running yet. But that fact hasn’t stopped others from saying they would stand behind Biden. Ocasio-Cortez, of course, is very young. And we shouldn’t necessarily take this is posturing for a run; she also has an interest in assuring Biden caters to her wing of the party, after all. (Previous ranking: 10)
9. Roy Cooper: The North Carolina governor is the would-be hopeful pushed by a set of Democratic strategists who think the best course is to nominate a Southern governor with proven crossover appeal (which Cooper certainly has). Whether he has any designs on running is another matter. The longtime former state attorney general had to be talked into running for governor in 2016, after all. So does he really have the desire to take the next, much-bigger step? It’s a very valid question: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) was a leading hopeful in 2020 before he decided he didn’t have the fire in the belly. Cooper can make an argument that few on this list can make, having won repeatedly in a state carried by Republican presidential nominees, including in the same election. (Previous ranking: 6)
8. Gretchen Whitmer: The Michigan governor checks a lot of boxes as a well-regarded, proven commodity in a swing state. And if she can win her 2022 reelection race — no easy proposition in this environment, but one aided by the GOP’s ballot problems — she’ll likely vault up this list. Interestingly, Whitmer recently passed on an opportunity to say whether she’d urge Biden to run again: “You know, I’m not going to weigh in on whether he should run,” she said, adding, “If he does run, he’ll have my support.” (Previous ranking: N/A)



7. Gavin Newsom: Perhaps nobody is making early and interesting plays these days as much as the California governor. He recently launched ads in Florida aimed at Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), the second-most-likely 2024 GOP nominee in our rankings. And Newsom has offered not-terribly-subtle criticisms of how his party is prosecuting the national political debate. We still don’t know that a former San Francisco mayor is really what Democrats are looking for, but it’s as evident as ever that Newsom is building toward something, no matter how much he downplays it. (Previous ranking: 9)
6. Bernie Sanders: Shortly after our last rankings, something interesting happened: Sanders’s 2020 campaign put out a memo stating that Sanders might run again, if Biden doesn’t: “In the event of an open 2024 Democratic presidential primary, Sen. Sanders has not ruled out another run for president, so we advise that you answer any questions about 2024 with that in mind,” the memo told supporters. The 80-year-old independent senator from Vermont had previously stated that he was “very, very unlikely” to ever run again, which at the time took him off this list. After the memo went public, Politico reported that Sanders himself had approved it. (Previous ranking: N/A)
5. Elizabeth Warren: The senator from Massachusetts has carved out some of her own space in the post-Roe v. Wade debate, proposing a crackdown on crisis pregnancy centers which she said are often “deceptive” efforts to “harass or otherwise frighten people who are pregnant to keep them from seeking an abortion.” She has frequently said she’s running for reelection and not president — but in that present-tense way that doesn’t specifically rule out that changing in the future. (Previous ranking: 4)







4. Amy Klobuchar: The best hope for the senator from Minnesota might be that Biden recovers but decides not to run anyway; her political profile is somewhat similar to Biden’s — that of a more traditional, pragmatic politician who isn’t necessarily going to wow anyone. It didn’t pan out for her in 2020, but without Biden in the race and potentially with Trump looming as the alternative, perhaps Democrats might be tempted for a similar recipe to what won in 2020. (Previous ranking: 5)
3. Kamala D. Harris: Historically, vice presidents have been able to craft images somewhat apart from the presidents they serve. But Harris has seen her image decline right alongside Biden’s. Just as Biden appears to be the most unpopular president at this point in his first term since Harry S. Truman, she is one of the most unpopular modern vice presidents at this point. She has a bigger pedestal than anybody on this list in the event of a post-Biden race. But the way things are going right now, she would need to somehow differentiate herself. And that’s not an easy trick when you’ve still got your day job. (Previous ranking: 3)
2. Pete Buttigieg: The transportation secretary continues to carve out a potentially attractive space in Democratic politics, quite apart from his Cabinet duties: as the guy able to go on Fox News and combat the right’s talking points in a calm and steady manner. Most recently, he did so on a protest of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh at a steakhouse. Similar to Newsom, if Democrats are putting a premium on the ability to drive a message against Republicans — a not-insignificant consideration in modern politics — Buttigieg makes a lot of sense. (Previous ranking: 2)







1. President Biden: Biden has almost always couched his 2024 plans as saying he “intends” to run, which carries some wiggle room. But The Washington Post’s Tyler Pager and Michael Scherer reported recently that it’s not just idle talk: that Biden’s political operation is doing the things you would expect to announce a reelection campaign next year. Biden this week also offered an animated response to the poll mentioned above, saying, “Read the polls, Jack. You guys are all the same. That poll showed that 92 percent of Democrats, if I ran, would vote for me.” That’s true, and he still narrowly led Trump 44-41 in a 2020 rematch, but all that’s in the general election. And polls show significantly fewer Democratic primary voters say they would vote to advance him to that contest. (Previous ranking: 1)

#9 has been workmanlike and solid during several years of upheaval. Repubs in the NC House and Senate have obstructed, but he is fairly savvy about his choices of when to fight…
The guy before him was turribly beholden to special interests, cough, cough, Dook Power, (no responsibility for deaths due to a coal ash spill) cough, cough, religious right (bathroom bill which lost the state bazillions in canceled events).

I guess that Cooper would be a decent candidate for the White House. He seems to be clean.
 
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kcnole63

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What do you guys think of Chris Murphy, the Senator from Connecticut? From what I know about him, I like him better than most on this list.
 
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Moral

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I could live with Sanders or AOC.

That being said I know the US is probably just going to get overly excited about to milquetoast neoliberal again. The Republicans will put up some absolutely terrible piece of shit and democrats will be like "you have to vote for this milquetoast to save is from trash candidate." Then either trash candidate or milquetoast win and we continue on with either gridlock with subtle corporate beejs or just open corporate beejs.

The future is so bright.
 
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FAUlty Gator

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Oct 27, 2017
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The country needs AOC as President. I sincerely doubt that happens, but that would be what is best for the country going forward.
AOC would have a hard time winning New York right now with what’s going on with the stupid “no bail” nonsense that’s been plaguing the city since she pushed for it. She’s gonna be wearing the responsibility of a lot of repeat violent criminals.
 

MeetTheFerentz

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Nov 20, 2006
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DeSantis crushes everyone of these candidates. What a sad sad list.
Are you talking about someone who currently is behind in a majority of polls head-to-head with the serious candidates on this list, when the Democrats are at their weakest possible point and he hasn't even begun to be scrutinized yet on a national level?

Just checking.
 

sigchandler8

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10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Remember how we mentioned pretty much everyone has indicated they’ll defer to Biden (whether or not they would ultimately do so)? Well, the New York congresswoman is the big name who hasn’t really done so. She recently declined to say whether she’ll back Biden in 2024, citing the fact that he’s not running yet. But that fact hasn’t stopped others from saying they would stand behind Biden. Ocasio-Cortez, of course, is very young. And we shouldn’t necessarily take this is posturing for a run; she also has an interest in assuring Biden caters to her wing of the party, after all. (Previous ranking: 10)
9. Roy Cooper: The North Carolina governor is the would-be hopeful pushed by a set of Democratic strategists who think the best course is to nominate a Southern governor with proven crossover appeal (which Cooper certainly has). Whether he has any designs on running is another matter. The longtime former state attorney general had to be talked into running for governor in 2016, after all. So does he really have the desire to take the next, much-bigger step? It’s a very valid question: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) was a leading hopeful in 2020 before he decided he didn’t have the fire in the belly. Cooper can make an argument that few on this list can make, having won repeatedly in a state carried by Republican presidential nominees, including in the same election. (Previous ranking: 6)
8. Gretchen Whitmer: The Michigan governor checks a lot of boxes as a well-regarded, proven commodity in a swing state. And if she can win her 2022 reelection race — no easy proposition in this environment, but one aided by the GOP’s ballot problems — she’ll likely vault up this list. Interestingly, Whitmer recently passed on an opportunity to say whether she’d urge Biden to run again: “You know, I’m not going to weigh in on whether he should run,” she said, adding, “If he does run, he’ll have my support.” (Previous ranking: N/A)



7. Gavin Newsom: Perhaps nobody is making early and interesting plays these days as much as the California governor. He recently launched ads in Florida aimed at Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), the second-most-likely 2024 GOP nominee in our rankings. And Newsom has offered not-terribly-subtle criticisms of how his party is prosecuting the national political debate. We still don’t know that a former San Francisco mayor is really what Democrats are looking for, but it’s as evident as ever that Newsom is building toward something, no matter how much he downplays it. (Previous ranking: 9)
6. Bernie Sanders: Shortly after our last rankings, something interesting happened: Sanders’s 2020 campaign put out a memo stating that Sanders might run again, if Biden doesn’t: “In the event of an open 2024 Democratic presidential primary, Sen. Sanders has not ruled out another run for president, so we advise that you answer any questions about 2024 with that in mind,” the memo told supporters. The 80-year-old independent senator from Vermont had previously stated that he was “very, very unlikely” to ever run again, which at the time took him off this list. After the memo went public, Politico reported that Sanders himself had approved it. (Previous ranking: N/A)
5. Elizabeth Warren: The senator from Massachusetts has carved out some of her own space in the post-Roe v. Wade debate, proposing a crackdown on crisis pregnancy centers which she said are often “deceptive” efforts to “harass or otherwise frighten people who are pregnant to keep them from seeking an abortion.” She has frequently said she’s running for reelection and not president — but in that present-tense way that doesn’t specifically rule out that changing in the future. (Previous ranking: 4)







4. Amy Klobuchar: The best hope for the senator from Minnesota might be that Biden recovers but decides not to run anyway; her political profile is somewhat similar to Biden’s — that of a more traditional, pragmatic politician who isn’t necessarily going to wow anyone. It didn’t pan out for her in 2020, but without Biden in the race and potentially with Trump looming as the alternative, perhaps Democrats might be tempted for a similar recipe to what won in 2020. (Previous ranking: 5)
3. Kamala D. Harris: Historically, vice presidents have been able to craft images somewhat apart from the presidents they serve. But Harris has seen her image decline right alongside Biden’s. Just as Biden appears to be the most unpopular president at this point in his first term since Harry S. Truman, she is one of the most unpopular modern vice presidents at this point. She has a bigger pedestal than anybody on this list in the event of a post-Biden race. But the way things are going right now, she would need to somehow differentiate herself. And that’s not an easy trick when you’ve still got your day job. (Previous ranking: 3)
2. Pete Buttigieg: The transportation secretary continues to carve out a potentially attractive space in Democratic politics, quite apart from his Cabinet duties: as the guy able to go on Fox News and combat the right’s talking points in a calm and steady manner. Most recently, he did so on a protest of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh at a steakhouse. Similar to Newsom, if Democrats are putting a premium on the ability to drive a message against Republicans — a not-insignificant consideration in modern politics — Buttigieg makes a lot of sense. (Previous ranking: 2)







1. President Biden: Biden has almost always couched his 2024 plans as saying he “intends” to run, which carries some wiggle room. But The Washington Post’s Tyler Pager and Michael Scherer reported recently that it’s not just idle talk: that Biden’s political operation is doing the things you would expect to announce a reelection campaign next year. Biden this week also offered an animated response to the poll mentioned above, saying, “Read the polls, Jack. You guys are all the same. That poll showed that 92 percent of Democrats, if I ran, would vote for me.” That’s true, and he still narrowly led Trump 44-41 in a 2020 rematch, but all that’s in the general election. And polls show significantly fewer Democratic primary voters say they would vote to advance him to that contest. (Previous ranking: 1)

All of these would be a horrible horrible choice.
 

CaboKP

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Nov 21, 2006
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AOC gets a lot of crap, but she'd be the Dems best option at getting millenials and Gen Z out to vote. But realistically she needs to wait until a majority of Boomers die out (voters and politicians) to actually be elected POTUS and achieve anything.

Warren. Bernie, & Biden will be too old.

Top 3 would be Newsom, Whitmer, and
Buttigieg.

Kamala and Klobuchar don't have the popularity to win the nomination let alone the general.

I know nothing of Cooper so I won't make a judgement on him.
I like the more moderate demand better personally and don't follow the more progressive types very close.

What are the top 5-7 issues the progressives would be trying to accomplish?
 

WDSMHAWK

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I like the more moderate demand better personally and don't follow the more progressive types very close.

What are the top 5-7 issues the progressives would be trying to accomplish?

If the Dems had a filibuster proof majority and the White House I'd want them to tackle these issues in no particular order.

Climate Change - Get the country off of oil as fast as possible.

Gun Control - Come up with some meaningful legislation that would theoretically pass the SCOTUS sniff test (good luck with this court though)

Reinstate the Voting Rights Act/Campaign Finance Reform/Gerrymandering ElImination - There are a lot of flaws in our election process but these are the biggest 3 in my opinion.

Codify the Right to Abortion & Gay Marriage. - Shouldn't be left up to states.

Invest in Public Education - A lot of schools are under funded (intentionally in some in states) and an educated population is good for the country.

Some Student Loan forgiveness plan/College affordability - I'm not saying it should be wipe out Student loan debt across the board. But a lot of young adults are being saddled with debt and the problem is only going to get worse.
 
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wcbtee

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10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Remember how we mentioned pretty much everyone has indicated they’ll defer to Biden (whether or not they would ultimately do so)? Well, the New York congresswoman is the big name who hasn’t really done so. She recently declined to say whether she’ll back Biden in 2024, citing the fact that he’s not running yet. But that fact hasn’t stopped others from saying they would stand behind Biden. Ocasio-Cortez, of course, is very young. And we shouldn’t necessarily take this is posturing for a run; she also has an interest in assuring Biden caters to her wing of the party, after all. (Previous ranking: 10)
9. Roy Cooper: The North Carolina governor is the would-be hopeful pushed by a set of Democratic strategists who think the best course is to nominate a Southern governor with proven crossover appeal (which Cooper certainly has). Whether he has any designs on running is another matter. The longtime former state attorney general had to be talked into running for governor in 2016, after all. So does he really have the desire to take the next, much-bigger step? It’s a very valid question: Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) was a leading hopeful in 2020 before he decided he didn’t have the fire in the belly. Cooper can make an argument that few on this list can make, having won repeatedly in a state carried by Republican presidential nominees, including in the same election. (Previous ranking: 6)
8. Gretchen Whitmer: The Michigan governor checks a lot of boxes as a well-regarded, proven commodity in a swing state. And if she can win her 2022 reelection race — no easy proposition in this environment, but one aided by the GOP’s ballot problems — she’ll likely vault up this list. Interestingly, Whitmer recently passed on an opportunity to say whether she’d urge Biden to run again: “You know, I’m not going to weigh in on whether he should run,” she said, adding, “If he does run, he’ll have my support.” (Previous ranking: N/A)



7. Gavin Newsom: Perhaps nobody is making early and interesting plays these days as much as the California governor. He recently launched ads in Florida aimed at Gov. Ron DeSantis (R), the second-most-likely 2024 GOP nominee in our rankings. And Newsom has offered not-terribly-subtle criticisms of how his party is prosecuting the national political debate. We still don’t know that a former San Francisco mayor is really what Democrats are looking for, but it’s as evident as ever that Newsom is building toward something, no matter how much he downplays it. (Previous ranking: 9)
6. Bernie Sanders: Shortly after our last rankings, something interesting happened: Sanders’s 2020 campaign put out a memo stating that Sanders might run again, if Biden doesn’t: “In the event of an open 2024 Democratic presidential primary, Sen. Sanders has not ruled out another run for president, so we advise that you answer any questions about 2024 with that in mind,” the memo told supporters. The 80-year-old independent senator from Vermont had previously stated that he was “very, very unlikely” to ever run again, which at the time took him off this list. After the memo went public, Politico reported that Sanders himself had approved it. (Previous ranking: N/A)
5. Elizabeth Warren: The senator from Massachusetts has carved out some of her own space in the post-Roe v. Wade debate, proposing a crackdown on crisis pregnancy centers which she said are often “deceptive” efforts to “harass or otherwise frighten people who are pregnant to keep them from seeking an abortion.” She has frequently said she’s running for reelection and not president — but in that present-tense way that doesn’t specifically rule out that changing in the future. (Previous ranking: 4)







4. Amy Klobuchar: The best hope for the senator from Minnesota might be that Biden recovers but decides not to run anyway; her political profile is somewhat similar to Biden’s — that of a more traditional, pragmatic politician who isn’t necessarily going to wow anyone. It didn’t pan out for her in 2020, but without Biden in the race and potentially with Trump looming as the alternative, perhaps Democrats might be tempted for a similar recipe to what won in 2020. (Previous ranking: 5)
3. Kamala D. Harris: Historically, vice presidents have been able to craft images somewhat apart from the presidents they serve. But Harris has seen her image decline right alongside Biden’s. Just as Biden appears to be the most unpopular president at this point in his first term since Harry S. Truman, she is one of the most unpopular modern vice presidents at this point. She has a bigger pedestal than anybody on this list in the event of a post-Biden race. But the way things are going right now, she would need to somehow differentiate herself. And that’s not an easy trick when you’ve still got your day job. (Previous ranking: 3)
2. Pete Buttigieg: The transportation secretary continues to carve out a potentially attractive space in Democratic politics, quite apart from his Cabinet duties: as the guy able to go on Fox News and combat the right’s talking points in a calm and steady manner. Most recently, he did so on a protest of Supreme Court Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh at a steakhouse. Similar to Newsom, if Democrats are putting a premium on the ability to drive a message against Republicans — a not-insignificant consideration in modern politics — Buttigieg makes a lot of sense. (Previous ranking: 2)







1. President Biden: Biden has almost always couched his 2024 plans as saying he “intends” to run, which carries some wiggle room. But The Washington Post’s Tyler Pager and Michael Scherer reported recently that it’s not just idle talk: that Biden’s political operation is doing the things you would expect to announce a reelection campaign next year. Biden this week also offered an animated response to the poll mentioned above, saying, “Read the polls, Jack. You guys are all the same. That poll showed that 92 percent of Democrats, if I ran, would vote for me.” That’s true, and he still narrowly led Trump 44-41 in a 2020 rematch, but all that’s in the general election. And polls show significantly fewer Democratic primary voters say they would vote to advance him to that contest. (Previous ranking: 1)

That list is so freakin sad.
 

CaboKP

HR All-State
Nov 21, 2006
532
492
63
If the Dems had a filibuster proof majority and the White House I'd want them to tackle these issues in no particular order.

Climate Change - Get the country off of oil as fast as possible.

Gun Control - Come up with some meaningful legislation that would theoretically pass the SCOTUS sniff test (good luck with this court though)

Reinstate the Voting Rights Act/Campaign Finance Reform/Gerrymandering ElImination - There are a lot of flaws in our election process but these are the biggest 3 in my opinion.

Codify the Right to Abortion & Gay Marriage. - Shouldn't be left up to states.

Invest in Public Education - A lot of schools are under funded (intentionally in some in states) and an educated population is good for the country.

Some Student Loan forgiveness plan/College affordability - I'm not saying it should be wipe out Student loan debt across the board. But a lot of young adults are being saddled with debt and the problem is only going to get worse.
I agree with many of those (gun control, codified rights, education, and climate change).

I only would like something done for Student loans if the root cause is fixed first.

Filibuster I disagree and the reason is lack of trust in our elected officials when one side has all the power.

I think the dependence on oil and coal will linger on regardless of the automotive industry. Reducing oil seems the goal for now.We'd all love to see nuclear fusion finally have major breakthroughs, but that is always 30 years away. We also need China/India to care about the environment also. That is much easier said than done.

I'm not familiar with the voting concerns/issue you mentioned, no opinion there.
 
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