Kadyn Proctor discussion on Washed Up Walkons

nu2u

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Aug 10, 2006
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What does Jesus have to do with this?

I mean we should explain the deal so the kids know to what they are agreeing. You guys are far too worried about what "people will say". We've had great recruiting classes since race baiters thought they could kill Kirk. The negative recruiters will say bad things, and they will always find bad things to say about Iowa, and every other competitor. I cannot imagine the presence of an 8th grade level consumer economics course, you know the one where you learn about family budgets, savings and investing, etc... would have any effect on recruiting.

The 18 year old recruit is only hearing the amount that will be on checks, and nothing else, and most will sell their soul for that amount of money. Welcome to the USA circa 2022.

Check the boxes. These players are all adults, are they not? They are being paid to play a sport for Iowa, are they not? Some will leave college independently wealthy and many will earn more than enough to hire their own CPAs, financial planners and brokers. Why should the U of Iowa divert its resources to assist these adult professional athletes with their financial management?

Indeed, how do you morally justify taking money from other things and people like the recruiting budgets, the non schollie teams, the advertising and PR budget, etc...to provide even more benefits and privileges to the University's most privileged, wealthiest students? That seems patently unfair.
They are not professional athletes and your insistence otherwise does not make it so. The rest of what you stated is a combination of conjecture and gibberish.
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

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May 9, 2018
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They are not professional athletes and your insistence otherwise does not make it so. The rest of what you stated is a combination of conjecture and gibberish.
Do they receive valuable compensation for playing a sporting game for Iowa? Indeed, aren't most NIL benefits, constitute compensation for playing a sport at Iowa? Isn't the receipt of that valuable compensation the very thing that makes them professionals? Unless you have some unique and unstated definition of what constitutes an amateur and a professional, or compensation or value, the receipt of money, or things of a specific economic value (e.g. a new Navigator) is the very fact that distinguish an amateur from a professional?

Your answers were just name calling the argument. I'll get back to "conjecture" and "gibberish" but first, are you capable of answering the three very specific and not particularly complex questions in any way other than an unqualified "yes"?

If you attempt to duck the questions, or answer them in an unserious manner, or just hurtle further insults, you really already have exposed yourself as simply an angry and not very bright asshole-because really just want to insult me and, this is actual conjecture but nonetheless well founded conjecture, I'm probably not your only victim. That personality type struggles with self esteem-they know they're dumb and it makes them angry when the extent of their monumental ****ing stupidity is exposed, and the kids all laugh at them. Are you that person or do you want to take a crack at intelligent discourse by answering the questions I asked above?​
 

nu2u

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Aug 10, 2006
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Do they receive valuable compensation for playing a sporting game for Iowa? Indeed, aren't most NIL benefits, constitute compensation for playing a sport at Iowa? Isn't the receipt of that valuable compensation the very thing that makes them professionals? Unless you have some unique and unstated definition of what constitutes an amateur and a professional, or compensation or value, the receipt of money, or things of a specific economic value (e.g. a new Navigator) is the very fact that distinguish an amateur from a professional?

Your answers were just name calling the argument. I'll get back to "conjecture" and "gibberish" but first, are you capable of answering the three very specific and not particularly complex questions in any way other than an unqualified "yes"?

If you attempt to duck the questions, or answer them in an unserious manner, or just hurtle further insults, you really already have exposed yourself as simply an angry and not very bright asshole-because really just want to insult me and, this is actual conjecture but nonetheless well founded conjecture, I'm probably not your only victim. That personality type struggles with self esteem-they know they're dumb and it makes them angry when the extent of their monumental ****ing stupidity is exposed, and the kids all laugh at them. Are you that person or do you want to take a crack at intelligent discourse by answering the questions I asked above?​
The University is not a professional sports organization. The student-athletes who enroll at Iowa are not professional athletes. They are subject to University admission and conduct standards; their eligibilty to play sports is governed by the NCAA - the National Collegiate Athletic Assocoation.

Payment for image and likeness does not de facto make college players professional athletes any more than a University of Iowa law student who receives NIL money is a licensed professional attorney.
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

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I don't think it is really an IQ thing, but give an 18 year old male a stack of cash, adoration of fans, including a lot of young hotties, mix in some people with their own financial agendas and what do you think will happen. Most of us were just never in that position but I know I made some really bad decisions at 18, most involving women and alcohol and I have a pretty high IQ, didn't matter LOL. A few drinks, a cute young thing and soon my pockets were empty, and i didn't have the advantages a scholarship athlete with NIL cash had. I'm not saying they shouldn't be given financial advice, but I doubt most will listen.
I still make shitty financial decisions, but I also don't expect someone else to teach me that you probably shouldn't spend money as fast as you make it.

Every man on here has done something stupid for a girl/woman, frequently involving a waste of money. Most of the time we knew it was stupid when were doing it, but a long shot is better than no shot at all, right?
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

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Payment for image and likeness does not de facto make college players professional athletes any more than a University of Iowa law student who receives NIL money is a licensed professional attorney.

I cannot believe you are arguing this point. The #2, common usage definition of "professional" is
"engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime: "a professional boxer." I added the emphasis. You implicitly concede the player is a subcontractor. Someone else pays the athlete to play a sport for a specific school. That is specifically how, big picture, NIL works.

You are conflating or perhaps confusing "professional" with "employee". True, the players are not W2 employees. However, someone is paying them to play a sport for Iowa as their main occupation, unless guys like Kayden Proctor have some other way to earn a million a year at age 18. It's the receipt of money or other things of pecuniary value for performing a service that makes a "professional".

Your law student analogy also shows you are using a very limited specialized definition. Yes, there is a special legal category of licensed professionals, covering every profession from barbers to undertakers and every other "profession" for which one needs a license from the state. However, even that definition fails you because the definition of a "statutory professional" only applies those to the limited number of occupations that require specific training and public oversight.

So while the players aren't W2 employees, the University has a 3rd party pay them to play sports for the University. The player still gets paid, with money, cars, future contract benefits, etc... for playing sports, which by definition means its no longer a pastime or hobby.



 

nu2u

HR Legend
Aug 10, 2006
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I cannot believe you are arguing this point. The #2, common usage definition of "professional" is
"engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime: "a professional boxer." I added the emphasis. You implicitly concede the player is a subcontractor. Someone else pays the athlete to play a sport for a specific school. That is specifically how, big picture, NIL works.

You are conflating or perhaps confusing "professional" with "employee". True, the players are not W2 employees. However, someone is paying them to play a sport for Iowa as their main occupation, unless guys like Kayden Proctor have some other way to earn a million a year at age 18. It's the receipt of money or other things of pecuniary value for performing a service that makes a "professional".

Your law student analogy also shows you are using a very limited specialized definition. Yes, there is a special legal category of licensed professionals, covering every profession from barbers to undertakers and every other "profession" for which one needs a license from the state. However, even that definition fails you because the definition of a "statutory professional" only applies those to the limited number of occupations that require specific training and public oversight.

So while the players aren't W2 employees, the University has a 3rd party pay them to play sports for the University. The player still gets paid, with money, cars, future contract benefits, etc... for playing sports, which by definition means its no longer a pastime or hobby.



Well, you gave it your best try.
 

nbanflfactory

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Aug 22, 2021
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They are not professional athletes and your insistence otherwise does not make it so. The rest of what you stated is a combination of conjecture and gibberish.
I haven't read the whole convo, but to say future players aren't pro athletes is simply incorrect.
 

natchrlman

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Jul 10, 2003
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Indeed, how do you morally justify taking money from other things and people like the recruiting budgets, the non schollie teams, the advertising and PR budget, etc...to provide even more benefits and privileges to the University's most privileged, wealthiest students? That seems patently unfair. You really cannot morally justify it, can you?
Sounds like you’re advocating Socialism 🤔 never saw that coming from you 😂😂
 

The Deplorable Sleeping Dog

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May 9, 2018
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No need to get angry, dog. You're argument is kind of silly but I do appreciate you sharing it.
Well I am too tired to pursue this further, trying to avoid demanding silence from the ocean. Afterall, what's the prize for besting a fool. You are that fool.
 
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nu2u

HR Legend
Aug 10, 2006
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Well I am too tired to pursue this further
You're excused. Case closed. Court is adjourned. Now hit the books/

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